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Full text of "University of Massachusetts Board of Trustees records, 1836-2010"

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I 



COMMITTEE 



1 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON 
FACULTY AND PROGRAM OF STUDY 

January 9, 1961, 11:00 a.m., Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston, Mass. 

Chairman Crowley presiding 

PRESENT: Trustees Brown, Crowley, Haigis, 
Schuck, President Lederle, 
Secretary Gillespie, Treasurer 
Johnson, Provost McCune and 
Dean Woods ide 

After reviewing proposed new undergraduate courses, new 
graduate courses, new graduate program as well as proposed dele- 
tion of courses from the University catalogue, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
it approve new undergraduate courses, 
graduate courses, graduate program and the 
deletion of courses listed in Attachment A 
to these minutes and hereby made a part of 
these minutes. 

Provost McCune discussed the average work load of a 
faculty member. He pointed out that the University has a concept 
of a "service" load rather than a "teacher" load because a Univer- 
sity teacher should do research along with his teaching assignment. 
To make certain that the courses at the University do not unduly 
proliferate, Provost McCune pointed out that each school has a 
course of study committee that keeps constant surveillance over 
proposals for new courses. Also at the University, there is a rule 
that an undergraduate class must enroll at least ten students and 
a graduate course must enroll at least five students. If some 
courses do not attract the required number of students, then the 
course is not taught, and if such a condition persists then 
eventually the course is eliminated from the curriculum. 



2273 



New 
Courses 



2274 



COMMITTEE 

Associate 
Degree 

Stockbridge 
School 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



The President discussed the Stockbridge School program 
and the rather unique but substantial role it plays in education. 
At the request of Stockbridge School students and the Stockbridge 
School faculty, he recommended that the program be recognized with 
the awarding of an associate degree to its graduates. 

On motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
it approve an associate degree for Stock- 
bridge School graduates who have met 
standards set by the faculty of the Stock- 
bridge School. The associate degree is to 
be awarded beginning with the graduating 
class of 1961. 

Shannon McCune discussed the ROTC program and its de- 
velopments at the University of Massachusetts. He announced that 
the Faculty Senate had appointed a committee to study the program 
and that the Committee on Faculty and Program of Study would soon 
receive their report from the faculty committee. 

The committee adjourned at 12:15 p.m. 




ecretary, iB/oard of v Trustees 



1 



COMMITTEE 



1 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

January 15, 1961, 1:00 p.m., University Commons, U of M 

Chairman Whitmore presiding 



PRESENT: Trustees Brett, Haigis, Schuck, 
Whitmore, President Lederle. 
Also Secretary Gillespie, Treasurer 
Johnson and Construction Engineer 
Hug ill 

Final plans and specifications for the Natural Resources 

Building were studied and reviewed. Mr. Brett questioned the need 

for such a building. It was 

VOTED : To approve the final plans and specifications 
of the Natural Resources Building. 

(Voting in favor of the motion were Whitmore, Haigis 
and Lederle; voting against approval - Brett; present but not 
voting - Schuck.) 

The final plans and specifications for the fourth section 

of the Science Center were reviewed and on motion duly made and 

seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
that they approve the final plans and 
specifications for the Science Center - 
fourth section. 

The final plans and specifications for the addition to 

the Physics Building were reviewed and on motion duly made and 

seconded, it was 

VOTED: To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
that they approve the final plans and 
specifications for the addition to the 
Physics Building. 

Preliminary plans of the Men's Physical Education Build- 
ing were studied. This is to be an intramural and teaching build- 
ing primarily. On motion duly made and seconded, it was 



2275 



Natural 

Resources 

Building 



Science 
Center - 
fourth section 



Physics 
Building 



2276 



Physical 

Education 

Building 



COMMITTEE 



Eastman 
Lane 



Land 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



VOTED : To approve the preliminary plans of 

the Men's Physical Education Building. 

The Planning Board of the Town of Amherst and the 
University of Massachusetts Planning Council joined the meeting. 
A discussion of the master plan development of the University was 
held. j It was requested by the Planning Board of the Town of 
Amherst that the Board of Trustees at its February meeting issue 
a definitive statement as to its attitude toward the proposed loca- 
tion of a bank and other commercial activity on property adjacent 
to the campus. The Planning Board has felt that there may be an 
effort at the next town meeting to change the zoning of adjacent 
property from residential to business use. They wish to cooperate 
with the Board of Trustees by trying to keep the property in 
question as "residential", if the Board of Trustees plans to in- 
corporate that territory into the campus. 

One member of the Planning Board also requested that the 
Trustees express their attitude toward the new fraternity- 
sorority location which has been proposed at the southwest edge 
of the campus. This development would be built by private in- 
vestors on land not owned by the Commonwealth. However, a portion 
of the proposed site on North Hadley Road is land shown on the 
master plan for University acquisition. 

Question whether the town should abandon Eastman Lane 
to the University was discussed but no decision was reached. 

President Lederle summed up the lengthy discussion by 
recommending that all land adjacent to the campus covered by the 
Trustee vote of December 10, 1960 be acquired as soon as appro- 
priations can be obtained. Further study will result in increased 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

cost and infringement by business. Highest priority should be 

given to the low land southeast of alumni field. High priority 

should also be given to land to the north of campus. It was 

VOTED : To recommend to the full Board that the 

Trustees inform the Amherst Town Planning 
Board that the Trustees intend to press 
for appropriations to acquire all land 
adjacent to the campus as per prior vote 
of the Trustees of December 10, 1960. 

Revised architectural plans and renderings of the ex- 
terior of the School of Business Administration Building were pre- 
sented. These changes were proposed by the designers, Campbell 
and Aldrich of Boston on their own initiative to make a more 
attractive building over that previously approved by the Trustees. 
The changes were made by the architect without cost to the Common- 
wealth. It was 

VOTED : To accept the revised design of the School 
of Business Administration Building. 

Miss Schuck requested permission of the chairman to 
change her vote on the preliminary plans on the Men's Physical 
Education Building so as to be recorded as opposed to the design. 

Since there has been a one-year delay in obtaining 

appropriations to build the School of Business Administration 

Building, it is apparent that there is a need for the next unit of 

the group - namely the 500-seat teaching auditorium. It was 

VOTED ; To request the Division of Building Con- 
struction Commission on Administration 
and Finance, to increase the scope of the 
project for the School of Business Administra- 
tion to include a 500-seat teaching auditorium 
as shown on the study plans and model. 

The meeting adjourned at 6:25 p.m. 




spie 
Trustees 



2277 



School of 
Business 
Administ rat ion 
Building 



Teaching 
Auditorium 

















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Theology Room 4 



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Room 2 

al Relations Room 4 



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Room 5 

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Room 4 

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Second Semester 



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Advanced Spanish 



.Room 3 
.Room 4 
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.Room 5 
.ivooxn 6 
.Room 3 



Room 2 

Middle Ages ...Room 5 

p h«'- ' Epistemology Room 3 

Phil. 105: Advanced Psychology Room 6 

e 103: The Family 



&£> (O 



COMMITTEE 



Department of 
Microbiology 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON 
FACULTY AND PROGRAM OF STUDY 

February 7, 1961, 11:30 a.m., Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston 

Chairman Crowley presiding 

PRESENT ; Trustees Crowley, Haigis, Kiernan, 
Schuck. Also, President Lederle, 
Secretary Gillespie, Acting Provost 
Woods ide 

President Lederle recommended that the name of the De- 
partment of Bacteriology and Public Health be changed as follows: 

Abolish the present name and create a new 
department to be called the Department of 
Microbiology. This department would remain 
in the College of Arts and Sciences. 

He also recommended the 

Transfer of work in Public Health to the 
School of Nursing. These changes would 
take place upon retirement of the present 
Head of the Department on July 1, 1961. 

The President said that he was convinced that the above 
changes are in line with modern developments in this highly techni- 
cal field. The new name symbolizes the fact that great emphasis is 
now placed upon viruses as well as on bacteriology as a field of 
study. These changes were included in the recommendations of a 
special advisory committee which was brought to the campus by the 
administration to study the programs in these areas. 

On recommendation of the President and on motion duly 
made and seconded, it was 



1 



COMMITTEE 



I 



2279 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the name of the present Department of 
Bacteriology and Public Health be changed 
to the Department of Microbiology within 
the College of Arts and Sciences and that 
work in Public Health will be transferred 
to the School of Nursing effective July 1, 
1961. 

The meeting adjourned at 12:15 p.m. 




le 
Trustees 



i 



2280 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



I 



[J 



COMMITTEE 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF COMMITTEE ON LEGISLATION 

February 13, 1961, State House, Boston, Mass. 

Chairman Fox presiding 

PRESENT ; Trustees Fox, Whitmore, Thompson, 
Haigis, Healey, Also, President 
Lederle, Secretary Gillespie, 
Treasurer Johnson 

The committee discussed bills affecting the University 
of Massachusetts. 

Those bills which would establish a branch of the Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts in the Boston area and would provide for 
the same quality and same curriculum as now offered at the Amherst 
campus were favored by the committee. 

House Bill 1800, which calls for consolidation of public 
higher education in Massachusetts by placing the state colleges 
and institutes under the direction of the University of Massachu- 
setts, was considered at length. It was the consensus of the 
committee that if the Legislature in its wisdom were to decide at 
this time all public higher education in Massachusetts should be 
consolidated, the University would do its best to operate the 
system. The committee reiterated that the chief interest now is 
maintaining a quality institution at Amherst with an expansion to 
take care of the growing needs of Massachusetts. It was felt that 
the Massachusetts system of higher education should not be re- 
organized hastily and without proper study. It was the committee's 
recommendation that the whole field of consolidated public higher 
education be studied and a report made to the Legislature for 
possible action at a later date. 



2281 



Public 
Higher 
Education 



/W^SO/w 



COMMITTEE 



Medical 
School 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

House Bills 2076, 2075 and 2376 introduced by Representa- 
tive Kaplan were discussed as to their timeliness. It was the con- 
sensus of the committee that action on these bills be held up at 
this time. 

The committee discussed at length the proposals for a 
Medical School. Because of a lack of unanimity of feeling in re- 
gard to a two-year and a four-year Medical School and its location, 
the committee decided to request the full Board of Trustees at its 
next meeting to take a stand on a Medical School. 

The meeting adjourned at 6:00 p.m. 





C 



John 
^cretary, 



/L 




<l*~sL' 



illespi( 
olard of Trustees 



COMMITTEE 



1 



1 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF THE MEETING OF THE AD HOC HONORARY DEGREE COMMITTEE 
March 1, 1961, 10:30 a.m., Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston, Mass. 

Chairman Brett presiding 

PRESENT : Trustees Brett, Haigis, Healey, 
Schuck, Thompson and President 
Lederle, Secretary Gillespie 

The following is a rough draft of a policy statement 
pertaining to the awarding of honorary degrees tentatively adopted 
by the committee. 

Honorary Degree Policy 

Candidates for an honorary degree must be men and women 
of great distinction. 

Factors which will be considered by the Trustees in 
granting honorary degrees are: (a) intellectual attainment of a 
high order in their field (b) outstanding achievement of which the 
University wishes to indicate its approval (c) extraordinary con- 
tribution to the well-being of the University or to the Common- 



wealth. 



The number of honorary degrees awarded will be limited in 



number in order to emphasize the honor being bestowed. 
Procedure 

1. The faculty through the President, the alumni 
through their organization, and individual 
trustees may submit names and biographical 
material to the Executive Committee of the 
University Trustees annually in November. 

2. The Executive Committee shall submit 
biographical material on all persons considered 
to all members of the Board of Trustees. 

3. The Executive Committee shall screen the candi- 
dates and make recommendations to the Board of 
Trustees. The Trustees will be allowed time to 
consider the nominees between meetings and to 
vote on them at the annual meeting in February. 



2283 



Honorary 

Degree 

Policy 



2284 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

4. The President of the University will notify 
all recipients, informing them of the 
character of the award and the date of the 
commencement . 

5. No degree will be awarded in absentia in a 
place other than the campus of the University 
except in extraordinary circumstances. 

The committee agreed to hold its second meeting on 
April 6 at 10:30 a.m. at the University of Massachusetts to con- 
sider proposals of other awards and to act on recommendations for 
honorary degrees. 

The meeting adjourned at 12:15 p.m. 




John jG.llespie 
lecretary, Board of Trustees 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON AGRICULTURE & HORTICULTURE 
March 27, 1961, 12:15 p.m., Parker House, Boston, Mass. 

Chairman Brett presiding 



PRESENT: Trustees Brett, Crowley, McNamara, 
Whitmore. President Lederle, 
Secretary Gillespie, Treasurer 
Johnson 



The Committee conferred with Arless A. Spielman and 
discussed with him problems confronting a College of Agriculture. 

On recommendation of the President and on motion duly 
made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees 
approve the new schedule of fees listed 
in Attachment A. 

The Committee on Agriculture and Horticulture agreed to 
a joint meeting with the Committee on Buildings and Grounds to view 
the proposed purchase of land for the College of Agriculture. 

The meeting adjourned at 3:30 p.m. 





John Gi 
cretary, Bo 





spie 

of Trustees 



2285 



Fees for 
Seed Testing 



2286 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



I 



I 



PKOPOSxiD BtiWSIQN OF THK SCHKtHU* OF Fiiu^ FOR 3£&i) tof IflG 
University of Maeeaehuseits se«d Laboratory 
Amherst, fta&. 



* 





Purity 


Gemination 


Purity and 


Moxicus .«eed 


fiJ> <« * >* 


9*£tf 


oalir 




Germination 


j£fig£tjSSl3L. 


Field Gropes 




Alfalfa 


lo50 


o75 




1*75 


1,00 


Beans-Field 


1,00 


.75 




lc25 


.50 


Bentgrass 


2.00 


lo50 




3.00 


1*00 


Birdsfoot Trefoil 


lo50 


,75 




1*75 


1.00 


^y Bluegrass 


2o00 


1,50 




3-00 


1,00 


merlon *iy Bluegrass 


2*50 


1,50 




3*50 


l o 00 


Brome Grass 


1,50 


1-00 




2.00 


1.00 


Buckwheat 


loOO 


,75 




1-25 


.50 


Cereals 


JLoUV 


loOO 




1.50 


.50 


Clovers 


1*50 


«75 




1,75 


1*00 


Cora 


l e 00 


.75 




1,25 


50 


Fescues 


la50 


:lgo 




2,00 


1.00 


lespedeza 


l a 50 


.75 




1,75 


1.00 


Millets 


lo50 


?5 




1.75 


1,00 


Orchard Crass 


1,50 


loOO 




2,00 


1.00 


Peas-Field 


loOO 


75 




lo 25 


.50 


cape 


1.00 


,75 




1,25 


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ivedtop-hulled 


2,00 


loOO 




2,50 


1.00 


oedtop- unhulled 


2.50 


loOO 




3o00 


1.00 


iweed Canary Grass 


1.50 


1,00 




2.00 


1*00 


ryegrass 


1*50 


loOO 




2,00 


loOO 


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only) 


1*50 


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sorghum 


loOO 


*75 




lc25 


c50 


Soybean 


loOO 


•75 




1,25 


a 50 


uudan Cirass 


1,50 


»75 




i.75 


.50 


Tobacco 


1,50 


loOO 




2.00 


loOO 


ilmothy 


lo50 


loOO 




2o00 


loOO 


Vetches 


1,00 


,75 




jL o £»<f 


.50 


Field or L&wn Mixtures s 












Two components 


3,00 


2.00 




4.50 


1,00 


ua<, additional eomp. 


loOO 


1.00 




1,50 


O # <# 4 


Flowers s 


lo50 


1,00 




2e00 


o50 


Trees & Shrubs: 


lo50 


1*50 




2o50 


.50 


Vegetable's & Herbs; 


lo50 


75 




1.75 


.50 


Cleaning Tobacco seeds *1«00 per 


pound or fraction of a pound 


based on 


original weight . 












Kinds of Seed Wot Listed: 


i #, ees are baseu on 


charges for other 


similai- seeds. 


^ctra Jirty samples and Other cervices: *'ees 


are 


based on time 


consumed in 



making tests, 

Free . T ests: ^taring the calendar year^ the Seed Laboratory will allow two tree 
germination teste- of vegetable or tobacco seed to any parson residing or 
doin* business in the Commonwealth. 



^Prepared November 29, i960, by Seed Laboratory, ./illiam k° uice, In Ch^r^e 



' 



I 



COMMITTEE 



II 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON 
FACULTY AND PROGRAM OF STUDY 

April 25, 1961, Noon, Parker House, Boston, Massachusetts 

Chairman Haigis presiding 

PRESENT: Trustees Haigis, Furcolo, Kiernan 
Lederle; also Secretary Gillespie 



President Lederle discussed the need for a short-term 



leave policy for faculty members during the summer vacation, 
motion duly made and seconded, it was 



On 



VOTED : To recommend to the Full Board that they 
approve the policy for a short-term leave 
for faculty members during the summer vaca- 
tion as described in Attachment A. 

Upon recommendation of the President and on motion duly 

made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees 

rescind its action of March 1, 1961 which 
placed work in Public Health in the School 
of Nursing, and that the work in Public 
Health be transferred to the Health Services 
under the direct administration of Dr. Robert 
W. Gage, as described in Attachment B. 

It was also 

VOTED : To recommend that Dr. Robert W. Gage's 
title be "Director of Health Services 
and Chairman of the Department of Public 
Health." 

Upon recommendation of the faculty, and on motion duly 
made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
they approve changes in course titles, 
changes in course credits , approval of re- 
vised courses, approval of deletion of 
courses , and other action pertaining to 
courses as set forth in Attachment C to 
these minutes. 



2287 



Short-term 

Leave 

Policy 



Public 
Health 



Change in Title 



Dr. Gage 



Courses 



J 



/32oo 



COMMITTEE 



Honors 
Colloquia 



Cooperative 
Ph.D. Program 
in French 



Ph.D. Program 
in Sociology 
and Anthro- 
pology 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Acting Provost Woods ide explained that during the present 
academic year four sophomore colloquia have been conducted. Each 
has brought together once a week for a two-hour period academically 
talented students for the purpose of informal discussion on in- 
tellectual issues. Each colloquium has been under the direction of 
two members of the faculty. A number of important books have been 
read and discussed. The students have been encouraged to raise 
questions, to think out their own conclusions, and to explain and 
defend their positions. Faculty participation in the colloquium 
has been limited essentially to defining the issues and to keeping 
the discussion germane. Students have received no academic credit 
for this work. 

The Course of Study Committee recommenda to the Board of 
Trustees that beginning in the fall of 1961 academic credit for 
work in the Honors Colloquia be given at the rate of one credit per 
semester. The semesters involved would be the second semester of 
the freshman year and both semesters of the sophomore and junior 
years . 

Upon recommendation of the Graduate Faculty, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
they approve a cooperative Ph.D. program in 
French as described in Attachment D. 

Upon the recommendation of the Graduate Faculty and on 

motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED: To recommend that the Board of Trustees approve 
a Ph.D. program in the Department of Sociology 
and Anthropology as described in Attachment E 
to these minutes . 



I 



The meeting adjourned at 2: 




John 
Secretary, Board' 




Attachment B 



University a seachusetta 



nt, rsaiOmz Jfeha W* Lederie. . fce: April : 6 9 Mi 

to: us be® Coagaittea on Faculty & Program of Study 



You m&y recall that as* February 7, 1961, the Trustee Cousalttoe 
on faculty zm& Vrogran of Study voted to rccoaraead to the Board of 
Trastees that the work in Pwbfcie Health fee transferred to the School of 
l&arsissg as of July I , 1961. This s-;o&OBBB©ndation was approved on Hatch 1 

by the Wall Boards of Trustees. 

for a mister of reaseas it now seams boat to changes this 
reeowwBdation. X recosGKmd that as? of July l g 1961, the work in public 
transferred to the final th Services under 'die direct adBlnistra- 

ts$oa ©£ ar* aobert W, Saga* 

Osa of the taportast reasons for this reeoimaeadattion is the 

fee «?© have now haen assured that the .B&ivarslty Health Services 

Bsofevrod to a Trust Wund operation during she present year* 
oua&, mt®m v thins© » that the Director if the Health Services 

will ba teas to devete Eoro tista ko tha relationships bttimn Public 
Health and Balverslty Health Services* It is evident that there are many 
ways i» %%ich the too activities can worh together lor tsstual benefit. 

The | sad racoaraeadatioe has been discussed with Been mzy A* 

mhm of the School of nursing* m% B^tot w. @age of the University 
Health Services* Professor &ob*rt C* Pertiello and m> ICarel s. Hisaieski, 
(The last t«o are fcha ecafoars of the Faculty «ho teach the courses in 
Public Health). The raeogansndatlon has the enthusiastic approval of all 
four of these people* &a hm@ also baaa informed that the Director of 
the State Department of Public Health, Cossnissloaer' Alfred L. Frechette, 
would fee pleased to have she work in Public Health associated with the 
Bfe&ta&dity Health Services* 

Fiaally s X wish to racosaaand that Dr. Eebert w. Cage's title fee 
Director of Health Services and chataaa of the Bepartoeafc of public Health. 



8 






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(/ John w. Lederle 



Pr 



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University of SfeSJJ&CtiUSCtfcS 

From: Mm W« Letforle, President Gate: Aptfil 2,4, 1961 

To j Trustee: Coamittee o« Faculty and Program of Study 

Gn the cceoracndatiOtt o£ the Acadeotie Bc&tidi I reconmend 
that a nmi type o£ shost*fceK« tcsftrs polity be c&tgbligbed whereby 
aio^ors of tli© faculty slight be able to attend bfciei educational 
pro^ra^s. tfuo purpose o0 such px-ogtaaa is to benefit; tee University 
by sttfCflfctbcning its own off critics* Most o£ the gSOgOTS involved 
ate held during the suonies oonthg wben faculty ncafegts Botaally do 
not liave formal University ££Spott$ibi3Liti&s« Thus they will not be 
relieved .of tegular duties'- iti otto to participate, fbey Hill, 
however » be prevented £ro& teaching in a s&tsraer session,. Bastly £0£ 
this reason* ws see amend that the University contribute to the 
£scu2ty tteabev a taodect stipend for/ the purpose of attending each a 
ptogxftffl?* Our: chief reason for sreeonfaendltts the mod&st stipend is 
that the programs of the tfn&versity will be enriched* lie further 
££gpastettd that the faculty somber be required to gcfoiso this stipend 
if be doers not remain on the faculty of the University £or" at least 
one year e£ter having attended the session* 



<£john E. Letele 
President 



I 



cl 



i 



a^» 



xmvm&m. m Massachusetts 

tixim*$$Mffl&t<£ Gentses 



Geology 60 Frinciples ot Physical Geography 
Physics 58 Photography 

(bysics 64 Optics 

HRH: <&emical £Mliuaerin& 61 - C&emlcal Eeginecriafi 

COUISSS Application of smthematical techniques to chemical 

engineering problems*. Analysis of problems, devising 
mthesaatiaal models /'machine computation f&th digital find 
analog devices. Prerequisites: Chemical Engineer las 56 
and Mathematics 32 . 
3 class hours Credit 3 

C%emlcal&B£Ei , Beovisg76 « Automatic Process Control 
A study of the theoretical and practical factors governing 
automatic control of industrial processes* Prerequisites: 
Chemical S&slneerixgg 56 and 81 and Mathematics 32, 

2 class hours 

I 3-bou? laboratory Credit 3 

Chemistry S3 (XX) Theoryot Analytical Processes 

A detailed consideration of analytical topics having general 

applicability in chemical Investigations. Ass>ng the areas 
included axe eh&Bleai equilibrium* precipitate formation, 
chelating agents s multistage separation, and quantitative 
methods for organic functional groups*. Additional topics 
may be selected fro® current literature. Ere* or co- 
reonlsites: Chismictry 52 and 66, 

3 class tsours Credit 3 
1 laboratory period., optional Credit 1 

Industrial Snainaevixw 56 a Analysis of Beta Processing Systems 
Principles end applications af data processing end 

electronic compute? systems for use by industrial Engineers 
and others as a tB8Q3$amest tool for control and decision 
making, Prerequisite* !«&* 51 or $!&&* 61, or approval of 
instructor. 

3 class tars Credit 3 

German 97 CI} t 98 <IX> Special Praises 

gilded seadins ^^ research in areas o£ specialisation. 
For qualified seniors* Credit 1-3 



Econosto 88 * Financial inspects ®2 Seeoeplsa 

fhe application of modern fclw~e£«£unds analysis to the 
financial behaviour ©£ the vaslons sectors o£ the economy. 
Special es^aasis is placed on the financial aspects o£ 
business unite and the business sector. Prerequisites: 
Economics Z5 and Accounting 25 or consent of instructor. 
3 class hours Credit 3 



I 



Wildlife l£aa a%e»mnt 97 ^ 7.), 98 (XI). Sp ecial Problem s 
in Wildlife yim®mwsfc. 

*wwm>ww» wh b| <i w » ' n « w iiii wurn iwM Hgwii Mi n i mn 'mta m n 

Qualified seniors who have completed isost of the 
wildlife courses stay arrange for work on a special 
problem In a selected phase of wildlife ©ajtageBtent . 
Total credit© for two semesters raay not exceed 6. 

Credit 2-4 






i 



Fundamental ecology and principles of wildlife management 
with aphasia on population characteristics and responses. 
2 class hours 
1 4-hour laboratory period Credit 3 

tfc&hcds of col lectins and interpreting data in wildlife 
fsanagessent wish e$^h&sis on field and laboratory experience 
in census naethods and criteria for determining se^, age and 
ether characteristics of wild birds and msm&l&* 
% class hours 

1 4-hoirr laboratory period Credit 3 

midlife MaaagesBsnt 63 ,(I) Mana&emattfc of Zetland Wildlife (1962-63) 

Life histories, identification and habitat requirements 
of waterfowl and marshland furbearia® eata&laj management of 
wetland habitats. 

2 elass hours 

1 4-hour laboratory period Credit 3 

Midlife Maasfiflasafe 64 (IX) KanageiBeat of Upland Wildlif e (1961"o23 

li&fe histories , identifications and habitat requirements 
of upland gojse birds , gams maiEstals, and furbesrers; Management 
of upland habitats. 

2 class hours 

1 4-hour laboratory period Credit 3 



CKS&XT 



Chemical. Emineering 25 and 26 , Fundamentals 

Increase from 2 to 3 class hours and from 2 to 3 credits. 
Chemical Engineering 55 and .56,, Unit g^rafeigajP I and XI 
Decrease from 3 class hours and 2 3-hour labs to 3 
class hours and 1 3«fe©nr lab, and decrease credits from 
5 to 4 per semester. 

Decrease from 2 4-hour labs, to 1 3-hour lab, and 
from 3 credits to 1 credit. 
Chemical Inmineerins 98 , Projects 

m < u rn in i i ■ unmrrrl ' i i i i " I ■ r" ■'"'■ " ™ ,. _ 

Oeerease £?em 2 4-hour labs, to total of © lab. hours 

per week and decrease credits from 3 to 2* 



I 



j 



3. 



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M®%Mm8M$$ Gejgrsxanfay. 33 ^Fundamentals of Geography 

The physical and cultural elements o£ geography and the 

patterns of their distribution. Physiography, climate, soil, 

resource© , populations settlement, agriculture, industry and 

their relationships* 

2 ®loss hours 

1 3-hour .'laboratory Credit 3 



hxusak* &m 



mx* 



The successful caqpletioa of at least 120 semester hours 

oi academic credit. Xn addition,, for men students, the 
successful conviction ©£ the . required 4 credits In basic 
Military Science or 2 credits for 4 semesters in basic M? 
Science courses. The satisfactory completion of the basic 
physical education courses required o£ all students. In- 
dividual colleges, schools, divisions and departssents may 
require more than 120 semester hours of acadestic credit. 



CQLL0QU3A 



Credit be given for academic work in the Honor® Colloquia 
Program at the r&te oil I credit per semester. 



I 



PBseRimoR 



E.E. 41 (I ),,. 42 (II) Linear Circuit Analysis I and II 

analysis using differential relationships, free and 

forced responses, complex frequency, steps and impulses , 

poles and saves and network theorems* Prerequisites, 

Mathematics 6 and fhysies 6. 

3 class hours 

1 3»hour laboratory Credit 4 



AND SS&SSXER 

mam 



BjSj^jjS to be included in first semester, junior year, and 
changed to 

E«E, S,l..(XI...X*ifMsar Circuit Analysis XXI 

Polyphase circuits, coupled circuits, harmonics, Fourier 

series, and magnetic circuit. Prerequisites ttochematics 32 
and Electrical Smgiaaaristg 42. 

3 class hours 

1 3-hour laboratory Credit 4 



k posfculatien study o£ probability including counting 
methods, random variables, moments, and the binomial, Poisson 
and normal distributions, Prerequisite Mathematics 29, pre- 
viously or concurrently. 
3 class hours Credit 3 

Mathematics 64 (IX) Math ematical Statistics 

Estimation of parameters, testing hypotheses use o£ the 
chi~squared* £~, F*, and other distributions. Prerequisite 
Mathematics 63. 
3 class hours Credit 3 



I 



Advanced Engineering. K&thctaatics 75 (I) 
COURSES Series solution of differential equations, functions 

of several -variables, partial differential equations, 
numerical analysis and Che Laplace transform. Kor avail- 
able for majors in Mathematics. Prerequisite: Mathematics 
92 or 32. 
3 class hours Credit 3 

Advanced g^toejaging l&thematlcsTgfXX) 

Vectors and vector spaces, vector field theory, complej 
analysis. lot available for majors in Mathematics. Pre* 
requisite: HatbcsBBties 92 or 32. 
3 class hours Credit 3 



I 



B£X$TX« Wildlife tfattogcsaesfc 70 Principles of Wildlife |fanageiaeu& 

71 ffoterfottl Biology and Management 

72 Forest *Anlsal !el&£ioa&&ips 

73 Wildlife Management 

74 Techniques in Wildlife Management 

75 Purbesrer Biology and Hetnagcment 

84 Seminar 

85 Wildlife Literature 



i 



I 



(Attachment 1) UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MEMORANDUM 
Prom . . . .Graduate Office Date # § # iprLl ^ j^ 

To Mfr.Joty £il.lespi© 



I 



The Graduate Council has voted approval of the following, subject to 
approval by the University of liassachusetts Board of Trustees: 

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 211, ADVANCED CHEMICAL ENGINEERING, -A course which intro- 
duces the student to advanced work in chemical engineering which applies 
the transport of momentum, of energy, and of material-, It supplies the 
background for study o5 fluid flow, heat transfer and mass transfer. Topics 
covered include: visocsiiy, thermal conductivity and diffusivity, momentum 
and energy balances, friction, turbulence, fluid friction, motion of sus- 
pended solids in fluids, and non-Newtonian fluids, Credit, 3« 
Prerequisite, Chemical Engineering £6. Mr, Kim and Mr. Lindsey, 

CHEMISTRY 207, CHEMICAL SPECTROSCOPY. -Technique end Applications. Contains an 
introduction to the elementary theory ,> experimental techniques and inter- 
pretation of data obtained in applications of infrared* Reman, visible^, 
ultraviolet, nuclear quadripole and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy 
to the solution of chemical problems. 

Three hours. Credit, 3. 

Prerequisite, Chemistry 66 or equivalent* Mr, Stengle and Mr, Stidhai 

CHEMISTRY 216, TOPICS IN INORGANIC CHEMISTRY,- Topics such as coordination 
chemistry, non-aqueous solvents, less familiar oxidation state, acid-base 
theories, reaction mechanisms, etc* will be offered* 

Two hours. Credit, 2, 

Prerequisite, Chemistry 186 or equivalent. Maximum credit, 6, 

The Staff. 

HISTORY 207, BRITAIN IN THE NINETEENTH CENTURY* -Central themes and topics. 
Emphasis on the history of thought in its relation to political, economics 
and social developments* Credit, 3» 

Three clas3 hours^ Mr, Gordon, 

Prerequisite, permission of instructor, 

HISTOHY 208, REGENT EUROPEAN HISTORY. -Basic developments in diplomatic, 
political, social and economic history since 1890 with particular emphasis 
upon organic growth end change. Credit, 3» 

Prerequisite, permission of instructor, Mr* Gordon. 

HISTORY 259, EUROPEAN DIPLOMACY BETWEEN T T E laARS Trunin* i n historical re- 
search and an introduction Into the relat: --r'-ips among European Nations 
in a critical -ttriod. Credit, 3. 

Prerequisite, permission of instructor, Mr» Caldwell, 

HISTORY 260, MODERN ENGLISH alSTORY, -Research on selected topics, 1890-19UO, 
Prerequisite, permission of instructor. Credit, 3. 

Mr, Caldwell, 



m 2 •» 

GEOLOGY 218, GROUND-WATER GEOLOGY. ~A comprehensive study of basic principles 
in geohydrology, including theoretical and practical ground-water hydrology 
and its relation to geomorphology, glacial geology, sedimentology, and 
engineering geology. 

Prerequisites, Chemistry 1 and 2, l£ hours of geologyj Credit, 3. 
78 and 9k recommended. Mr. Motts. 

ROMANCE LANGUAGES 23£, HISTORY OF THE FRENCH LANGUAGE. -A study of the develop- 
ment of the French Laiguage from its earliest beginnings to the present. 
Prerequisite, permission of instructor. Credit, 3, 

The Staff. 

ROMANCE LANGUAGES 2%, FRENCH PHILOLOGY. -A continuation of course 201 with 
emphasis on French Philology. Credit, 3$ 

Prerequisite, Romance Languages 201. The Staff, 

ROMANCE LANGUAGES 285, 286, SPECIAL STUDIES IN 19TH CENTURY FRENCH LITERATURE.- 
Prerequisite, permission of instructor. Credit, 3 each semester. 

The Staff. 

ROMANCE LANGUAGES 1*00, THESIS, Ph.D. degree. Credit, 30. 

ZOOLOGY 210, ELECTRON MICROSCOPY. -Lectures and laboratory on the electron 
microscope and specimen preparation. Credit, 3# 

Prerequisite, permission of instructor. Mr. Anderson. 

ZOOLOGY 275, FINE STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION OF CELLS. -Lectures, discussions, 
readings, and reports on fine structure of cells and dynamic morphology. 
Prerequisites, Zoology 183 and 273 or their equivalents. Credit, 3» 

Mr. Anderson. 

SOCIOLOGY 283, CONTEMPORARY SOCIOLOGICAL THEORY. -A consideration of the litera- 
ture from 1900 to the present. 

Prerequisites, Sociology 281, 282, and permission Credit, 3» 

of instructor. Mr. Gordon. 

SOCIOLOGY 281*, CONTEMPORARY SOCIOLOGICAL THEORY.-A consideration of the litera- 
ture from 1900 to the present. 

Prerequisites, Sociology 281, 282 and 283, and permission Credit, 3» 
of instructor. Mr. Gordon. 

SOCIOLOGY 298, ADVANCED RESEARCH METHODS. -A research project designed and 
carried out by the student under the supervision of a member of the staff. 
Sociology 297 and 298 must be completed with a grade of "B" or higher before 
a student is permitted to undertake a dissertation. Credit, 3# 

Prerequisites, Sociology 297 » and permission of instructor. The Staff. 

SOCIOLOGY 1+00, THESIS, Ph.D. degree. Credit, 30. 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 
MEMORANDUM 

From . • . $raduate,omce Date . . . £efcruary.29,.l$6; .... 

To .... ^i «Jofcn.GUlespie 

The Graduate Council has voted approval of the following, subject to 
approval by the University of Massachusetts Board of Trustees: 

SOCIOLOGY 212, SOCIAL CHANGE - Analysis of change as a process, especially 
the factors making for acceptance or rejection of innovations. Planned 
and unplanned consequences of social movement, technological invention 
and culture contact. Credit, 3 

Prerequisites, Sociology 72 or permission of instructor Mr. King 

SOCIOLOGY 215, THE SOCIOLOGY OF RELIGION - The relations of religious 
ideology and ecclesiastical organization to the total social institu- 
tional system. Special attention to the religions of larger civiliza- 
tions, especially Islam, Buddhism, Medieval Christianity, Gentile 
Paganism, Protestantism, and Judaism. Credit, 3 

Prerequisite, permission of instructor. Mr. Manfredi 

SOCIOLOGY 216, CORRECTIONAL THEORY AND PRACTICE - An analysis of contem- 
porary approaches to correction. An evaluation of probation, parole, 
the socialized court movement, community crime prevention, and related 
problems. Credit, 3 

Prerequisites, Sociology 78, 195. Mr. Yablonsky 

SOCIOLOGY 217, JUVENILE DELINQUENCY - Theories of causation and treatment 

of delinquency. Credit, 3 

Prerequisites, Sociology 78 or permission of instructor Mr. Yablonsky 

SOCIOLOGY 218, INDUSTRIAL SOCIOLOGY - A study of the role, status, and 
function of the worker in the industrial community; the impact of 
technological change on the community} analysis of selected occupational 
functions. Credit, 3 

Prerequisites, Sociology 68 or Economics 79 or permission »f 

instructor. Mr. Korson 

SOCIOLOGY 231, SOCIAL GERONTOLOGY - Implications of aging for society and 
the individual. Position of the aged in non-industrialized and indus- 
trialized societies. Changing roles of older people in the American 
family and the community. Credit, 3 

Prerequisites, Sociology 82, 195. M*« Kin € 






«• 2 *» 



SOCIOLOGY 232, SOCIOLOGY OF MEDICINE. -A survey of theory and research 
concerned with medical care as a social institution*, The relation 
of social factors to illness, and social processes involved in 
medical education. Credit, 3» 

Prerequisites, Sociology 82, 195, Mrs* Goss. 

SOCIOLOGY 271, POPULATION 0? BIDIA AND PAKISTAN. -Trends in population 
growth and its distribution among various social strata,, An assess- 
ment of the relative influence of fertility, mortality, migration, 
social organization, and cultural values on growth patterns. 
Prerequisites, Sociology 61, 1$$ Credit, 3« 

Mr* Driver* 



Gilbert L» Woodside 
Dean, Graduate School 



2) 



(Attachment 2) 



PETITION TO THE GRADUATE COUNCIL FOR PERMISSION 
TO OFFER THE COOPERATIVE Ph.D. IN FRENCH 

I. Pre face . The Departments of French at Amherst, Mount Holyoke and Smith 
Colleges and the Department of Romance Languages at the University of 
Massachusetts have met severally and individually and have formally voted 
to petition the Graduate School Council for permission to offer the coop- 
erative Ph.D. degree. The four department heads have also met and dis- 
cussed all details of the program and petition at length and subscribed 
unanimously to this petition. 

11 • Equipme nt and facilities. The joint equipment and facilities of the four 
institutions are "comparable to the best for languages found in any insti- 
tution in the country. Three of the four institutions have large, well- 
equipped language laboratories and adequate to excellent classroom facil- 
ities. The University of Massachusetts equipment is at present equal to 
the best to be f oundaaywhere in the United States with some functions un- 
duplicated anywhere. 

111 • Library resources . Admittedly, the literature facilities in French at the 
University of Massachusetts are meager. However, a gc:;d basic working 
library is new available and books as yet uncatalogued bptlioeatediinUkhe 
library will soon be available and will make an excellent nucleus of 
materials for graduate study. In the HILC periodical collection there are 
already over fifty periodicals of value in this field in addition to the 
thirty periodicals on the regular University of Massachusetts subscription 
list. The total library facilities in French of the four- colleges are equal 
to that of any but tne very largest universities in this country. Many 
collections at the other three- colleges are outstanding and it is note- 
worthy that Amherst and Mt. Holyoke Colleges have the catalogue of the 
Bibliotheque Nationale, Paris, the largest library in the world. Mt. 
Holyoke College has the catalogues of the British Museum and the Congres- 
sional Library. The reference sources at Smith College are equally rich. 

•^* Funds for fellow ships and scholarships . The three private institutions 

have generous funds for fellowships, and it is expected that the Department 
of Romance Languages will also be allotted its share of teaching fellow- 
ships and departmental! assistantships. The position of teaching associate 
will also be usei as fellowship aid, NDEA graduate fellowships are also a 
possibility, 

V. The Curriculum. 

A. All courses at the four institutions /?iiich give both graduate and under- 
graduate credit, i.e., all advanced ma.ior courses, There are over 
forty of these. The University of Massachusetts general requirements 
and the proposed special requirement for the PfcuD. in French will, off 
course, prevent any heavy concentration of elections in this area. 

B. These graduate courses now offered at: 

1. Mount Holyoke: French 1|01-L02: Modieval French Language and 
Literature. 6 hours. Miss Dean. 



I 



I 



I 



- 2 - 

French ij.05: The Renaissance* an intensive study of the works of the 
two outstanding authors of the Renaissance: Rabelais, Ronsard or 
Montaigne. 3 hours. M. Saintonge. 

French 1^07, I4O8: Classicism: an intensive study of the work of a 
representative author of the seventeenth century. 
6 hours. M. Saintonge. 

French IjlO: Voltaire and Rousseau. 3 hours. Mrs. Stevens. 

French U60: An intensive study of the work of an outstanding 
author. 3 or 6 hours. 

2t Smith College: k$a. History of Modern French Thought. 
The Renaissance to the present. 

(Li7a Studies in Eighteenth-Century Literature. Alternates with lj8a) 

l+8a Studies in Nineteenth-Century Literature with Emphasis on 
Victor Hugo. Alternates with U7a. 

50, 50a, £ob Research and Thesis. 3 or 6 hours. 

5>1, 51a, 5lb Advanced studies arranged in consultation with the 
Department. One hour or more. 

52 Old French. Linguistics and literature. Miss Leland. 

53 Problems of Modern Syntax. Miss Cattanes. 

56a Development of Literary Criticism in France. Mr. Guillotan 
56b Literary Relations between England and France in the 18th 
Century. Mr. Guilloton. 

5l0b French Poetry from 1885 to the Present. 

3* Univers ity cf M ass achuse tts 

Specia l requirements fc /'the Ph.D« in French. In addition to all the 
regular Fh,"% roquirenJV ts at the University of Massachusetts, the 
cooperative P.!i,D« in French would like to include the following re- 
quirement f .T'ad general directives; 

A. 3?he Guidance Committee will, in consu].taticn with the candidate, plan 
the entire program of work for the degree* 

B f In addition to the general requirements at the University of Massa- 
chusetts, the following special requirements mus'c be met: 

1. Required courses: 

a„ One semester of Old French readings 

b. One semester of French Philology 

c # One semester of Linguistics 

d. 1*00, Ph.D. thesis. 

2. A minor consisting of a minimum of 15 credits;in an allied field, 
subject to the approval of the Guidance Committee, 



I 



M 3 " 

3» A reading knowledge of a second Romance Language, and of German 
(or other major language outside the Romance group) 

k» Candidates planning on writing a thesis on the Medieval or the 
Renaissance field must have a reading knowledge of Latin* 

£• An oral examination, conducted in French, as part of the pre- 
liminary comprehensive examination. 

6. A comprehensive knowledge of the whole body of French literature. 

7o A thorough knowledge of the candidate's special field. 

8. Evidence of a knowledge of the history and culture of France* 
determined by the comprehensive examination and performance 
in course s 3 

9* Evidence of the ability to teach French. 

D. Strongly recommended: 

1. One semester of Advanced Phonetics. 

2 9 A period of residence in France. 

COUBSES OPEN TO GRADUATE STUDENTS OHLI 
(For either major cr miiio? credit/) 

200. Problem Course 3 Credit, >6, This Staff, 

201. Introduction to Philology,- Credit, 3. The Staff, 

202c. Old French or Old Spanish Readings. Credit, 3« The Staff 

203,; 20ij. o A.rea Studies in French or Hispanic Civilization, 
Credit s 3 ec.ch semester. The Staff. 

205., 2P6, Advanced Studies in French or Hispanic Literature. 
Credit^ 3 each semester. The Staff, 

ZX5 XiS^ Seminar in Fvench or Spanish, Credit, 2*3 each semester. 

The Staff. 

235' v /E-sttfi-y of the French Language* Credit, 3* The Staff. 

221;, French Philology,. Credit, 3* The Staff. 

285.-. 286* Specie! studies in 19th Century French Literature c 

Credit., 3 each semester. The Staff, 
300> Thesis, Master* s L agree,. Maximum credit, 10. 
U00. Thesis, Ph D degree. Credit 3 30. 



I 



« h *» 

COURSES OPEN TO BOTH GRADUATE AND UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 
(For either major or minor credit) 

l£l, French Literature of the Eighteenth Century* 
Credit, 3. The Staff. 

153, 15U» French Literature of the Twentieth Century, 
Credit, 3 each semester. Miss Clarke. 

155, 156. French Literature of the Seventeenth Century. 
Credit, 3 each semester. Mr, Johnson, 

157 9 158, French Literature of the Nineteenth Century. 
Credit, 3 each semester, Mr, Goding. 

175. Cours De Style. Credit, 2, Hr. Smith 

177. The French Renaissance I. Credit, 2, The Staff. 

178. Advanced French Studies II, Credit, 2. The Staff. 
179o French Civilization, Credit, 3« Hr, Coding. 
180, Advanced Language Study* Credit, 3t Mr» Godinga 

Linguistics 
197, Linguistics^ Credit, 3« -^- Uackart, 



m 5 *■ 



VII. The F aculty . The combined strength of the staffs in French in the four 
colleges is outstanding. The interest in research, publication and 
teaching advanced courses is high. Partial evidence is herewith sub- 
mitted in the following list of some of the persons who would teach the 
graduate work. Formal nominations for membership on the Graduate Faculty 
of the University of Massachusetts accompany this petition. (In the case 
of persons who received their education in France it should be noted 
that "Lioence" roughly equates to our A.M. and that "agregation" is 
generally esteemed a good deal more demanding than our Ph.D.) 



CASSIRER, Thomas (Smith College) 

B.A. (Honors) McGill University 
Ph.D. Yale University 



JOHNSON, Ernest A., Jr. (Amherst 

B.A. Amherst College College) 
Ph.D. Harvard University 



CLARKE, Katharine A. (U. hf Mass.) JOHNSON, Robert B. (University of 
B.A. Goucher College A.B. Ohio University Mass.) 

M.A. Middlebury College M.A. University of Wisconsin 

Docteur de 1 ! University, Grenoble Ph.D. University of Wisconsin 
(Member of Graduate Faculty, U of M. ) 

LELAND, Marine (Smith College) 

COLLIGNON, Jean Henri (Smith College) 
Licence d 'Anglais, U of Toulouse 
Agregation d ? Anglais U of Paris 



Ph.D., Litt.D. (Hon.) 



MAD, William C. (Smith College) 
B.A* Ur&yersit:? oi Maryland 
Univsrsite de Psjris 'Lettres) 
Ph.B« Yale University 

RAHr^O. Agnes G. (University of 
B.A, Wilson College Mass.) 
M.A. Syracuse University 
D.M.L. Middlebury French School 
Fellowship at the Ecole Ncrmale Superieure, Paris 

Licence en Philoscphie Sorbonne SAINTONGE, Paul F. (Mt. Holyoke 
Licence en Anglais Sorbcme. A,B, Harvard University College) 

Bi;;"o..iu d : Etude* S'.roerieures en Anglais Sorbonne A.M. Harvard Univer- 
Agr~gat:Loa de 1 ^Lriiversite en Anglais Sorbonne sity 

Ph.D. Harvard University 



DEAN, Ruth J. (Mt, Holyoke College) 
B»A. Wolleeley College 
B.A. (Fyriors) 0?::Cord University 
M.A, Oxford Tinirersity 
D. Phil. Oxford University 

DOUBROVSKY, Julien S. (Smith College) 



FRENCH, Reginald F. (Arherst College) 
B.A' Baruicuth College 
Ph..O. Ha.r--.rd University 

GIORDANET:"::. , E:mo (Amherst College) 
B.A-, Sawdoin Collage 
VI". -iU Princeton University 

GODING, Stowell C. (U. of Mass.) 
B.A. Dartmouth College 
M»A. Harvard University 
Ph.D. University of Wisconsin 
Member, Gradate Faculty, U. of M. 



SMITH, Harold L., Jr. (U. Of Mass.) 
Bacoalaurort, Lycee Pasteur 
B«Ar S'war<.]naore College 
M.A. Columbia University 
PhvD. University of Wisconsin 

STEVENS, Alice C. (Mt. Holyoke 

A.B. (Highest Honors) College) 

Mt. Holyoke 
M.A. Radcliffe College 
Ph.D. Radcliffe College 



GUILLOTON, Vincent (Smith College) 
Baccaj.anreat- as-Let tres 
(Universite de Rennes) 
Licence-es-Lettres (Sorbonne) 
Agrege de l'Universite 
Ancien Eleve de l J Ecole Normale Superieure 



TURGEON, Frederick K. (Amherst 

A.B, Bowdcin College College) 
A.M. Harvard University 
Ph.D. Harvard University 
M.A. (Hon.) Amherst College 



! 



£ 



(Attachment 3) 

Prom: J. Henry Korson Date: March 17, 1961 

To: Dean Woodside c.c. Graduate Council 

Re: Petition for permission to institute a Ph.D. program in the Department 
of Sociology and Anthropology 

For a number of years, inquiries and requests for graduate training at the Ph.D. 
level have outnumbered requests for M.A. training by two to one, Vnithin the last 
two years, both the number of applications and the ratio have increased markedly. 
It is obvious that a need exists that is not otherwise being met. Such inquiries 
and requests come from not only the state of Massachusetts, but from other parts 
of the country,: and even abroad. With the addition of Dr. Milton Gordon to the 
department in September 1961, the staff will number ten—all trained at major 
institutions. It is felt that we are now in a strong position to begin such a 
program. At the present time, 10 graduate students are enrolled in the department, 
and more are expected in the coming year. About a dozen applications have been 
processed for admission to date, and at least another dozen will be processed in 
the next month. All those approved for admission have a 3.0 average or higher in 
Sociology and Anthropology courses at the undergraduate level. 

The department feels the resources are present, both in manpower and facilities, 
to initiate a program leading to the Doctor of Philosophy degree in Sociology. 
Should this request be approved by the Graduate School Council and the Board of 
Trustees, it is planned to accept for candidacy for the Ph.D. degree no earlier 
than September 1962, those students who hold, or have completed all the require- 
ments for the M.A. degree in Sociology at this university or an institution of 
equivalent standing. 

Those courses, such as Sociological Theory will continue to be offered annually, 
while most others will be offered in alternate years, or as needed. In this 
manner it is felt that manpower can be conserved and most efficiently used. 

Any Sociology Department which attempts to offer graduate work at any level must 
begin with solid offerings in Sociological Theory and Research Methods. For 
several years the department has offered a full year of Sociological Theory, 
(Soc. 281 & 282, 6 credits), taught by Dr. John Manfredi, whose special forte has 
been the historical and philosophical approaches to the study of organized 
societies. It is planned to introduce an additional year of Advanced Sociological 
Theory (Soc, 283 & 284, 6 credits) which will be concerned with the more recent 
developments in the field in the last two generations. It is planned that a new 
man, Dr. Milton Gordon, will teach this course. In addition, 12 credits in Re- 
search Methods, and six credits of Statistics will be required of all Ph. D, 
candidates, (Three credits in Statistics taken at the undergraduate level may, 
with the permission of the department, be counted toward this requirement.) The 
Research Methods will be taught by a member of the department (Dr. Keith Lovald), 
while a student will have the opportunity to select from among the Statistics ■ » 
courses already taught on this campus in the departments of Agricultural Economics, 
Mathematics and/or Psychology. 



Dean Woodside 



Four-Coll ege Cooperation: A year ago a meeting was held with sociologists from the 
ether colleges in the Valley, at which time they were invited to participate in the 
development of a cooperative four-college Ph.D. program. Unfortunately, all of the 
sociologists at the other colleges are heavily engaged in undergraduate teaching, 
and offer little or no graduate work in their own institutions. (For example, none 
is a member of the graduate faculty.) It is possible that in the future some 
graduate work may be offered in the other institutions, and at that time it will 
be possible to offer a cooperative program. Mr. Allen Kassof, of Smith College, 
was the only member of that department to offer to participate in the program, and 
a course he proposed (Soc. 233 Social Institutions of the U.S.S.R. ) was approved 
by the Graduate Council, Unfortunately, Mr. Kassof has since accepted a position 
at Princeton University, and will leave the Valley in the fall. It is with regret 
that we must request that Soc c 233, Socia l I nstitution s of the UeS.S^R . be dropped. 
Mrs, Mary E. Weber Goss, a research associate at the Cornell University College 
of Medicine in New York City, but who resides in Amherst, was also invited to par- 
ticipate. (Mrs. Cross's work is such that she spends only a part of each month in 
New York City, and most of it in Amherst.) As will be seen by the attached state- 
ment, Mrs. Goss is well prepared to prticipate in our graduate program. 

Research Resources : Although the resources of Gocdell Library are in some respects 
limited, the combined resources of the four college libraries and the Hampshire 
Interlibrary Center, make it possible to carry on research in certain areas. The 
newly-acquired Human Relations Area File, housed in Goodell Library, will also 
provide a valuable resource. It should also be pointed out that many field studies 
can be conducted at such institutions as the Northampton State Hospital, the 
Berkshire Farm for Boys, in Canaan, New York; Women's Reformatory, Framingham; 
Men's Reformatory, Concord; The Bureau of Classification, Department of Correction; 
Youth Service Board, Department of Education; The United Prison Association, Boston; 
under the direction of members of the department. Cooperation from the staffs of 
these institutions has already been assured. 

Special Department Requirements: In addition to the standard requirements of the 
graduate school for the Ph.D. degree, this department will require that the candi- 
date complete 12 credits in Sociological Theory, 6 semester hours in Statistics, 
12 semester hours in Research Methods, 6 semester hours in Anthropology courses 
at the 200 level, and a series of written examinations in: 

a) Sociological Theory 

b) Research Methodology 

c) Two other substantive areas 

d) Minor areas, where required 

Language examination s: In conjunction with the normal requirements of the Graduate 
School, "the department expects each entering student to pass one language examin- 
ation before the end of the first full year of study, and the second language 
examination before registering for Soc. 283 and 284. One language not native to 
the student may be substituted for either French or German, provided it is demon- 
strated that the substitute language will be useful and necessary in completing 
the research for the doctoral dissertation. 



' 



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Dean Woodside 



Graduate Record Examination : Although this examination is not necessarily used 
for the purposes of admission, graduate students are required to take this exam- 
ination before admission, or as soon after the opening of the school year as 
possible. 

Time Limit : In order to encourage students to complete all the requirements for 
the Ph.D. in the shortest possible time, the department plans to institute the 
following time limit: 

a) A student who undertakes graduate work with no advanced standing must com- 
plete all requirements for the Ph.D.. within seven years from the date of his first 

enrollment f 

b) A student who enters with the M.A. degree must complete all requirements 
for the Ph.D. within five years from the date of his enrollment. 

c) A student may petition the department in writing for a waiver of this rule. 

Manpower : As stated above, the department will, as of September 1, 1961 have the 
necessary manpower to support this program. In an effort to conserve manpower, 
some courses will be offered annually, and others in alternate years, or as needed. 

The following is a list of courses which we would plan to offer annually: 



Soc. 200 - Research project 

" 214 - Criminology 

" 217 - Juvenile Delinquency 

" 281 - Sociological Theory 

m 282 - ■» » 

" 283 - Advanced Sociological Theory 



Soc. 284 - Advanced Sociological Theory 
" 298 - Advanced Research Methods 

Anth.136 " Individual & Society 
3.37 - Anthropological Theory 



The following courses will not be offered more often than in alternate years or 
as the occasion warrants: 



Soc. 212 

» 215 

» 216 

" 218 

» 229 



Social Change 
Sociology of Religion 
Correctional Theory 
Industrial Sociology 
Small Groups 



Soc. 231 

» 232 

« 262 

» 271 

" 298 



Social Gerontology 
Sociology of Medicine 
Demography 
Population of India 
Interneship 



Sincerely yours, 



J, Henry Kcrson 



f 



I 



SOCIOLOGY AND ANTHROPOLOGY 

SOCIOLOGY 

COURSES OPEN TO GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY 
(For either major or minor credit) 

200. SPECIAL PROBLEM. Credit 3-6. The Staff. 

212. SOCIAL CHANGE. Credit, 3* Mr. King. 

21iu CRIMINOLOGY. Credit, 3. Mr. Driver. 

215. THE SOCIOLOGY OF RELIGION. Credit, 3. Mr. Manfredi. 

216. CORRECTIONAL TII30RY AND PRACTICE. Credit, 3. Mr* Yablonsky* 

217. JUVENILE DELINQUENCY, Credit, 3« Mr. Yablonsfcy. 

218. INDUSTRIAL SOCIOLOGY. Credit, 3. Mr. Korson. 

229. SOCIOLOGY OF SMALL GROUPS. Credit, 3. Mr. Yablonsky* 

231. SOCIAL GERONTOLOGY. Credit, 3« Mr. King, 

232. SOCIOLOGY OF MEDICINE. Credit, 3. Mrs. Goss. 
259. SOCIAL STRATIFICATION, Credit, 3* Mr. Lopreato, 
262. DEMOGRAPHY. Credit, 3* Mr. Wilkinson, 

271. POPULATION OF INDIA AND PAKISTAN. Credit, 3. Mr. Driver. 

281. HISTORY OF SOCIOLOGY THEORY. Credit, 3. Mr. Manfredi. 

282. HIFfOBY OF SOCIOLOGICAL THEORY. Credit, 3. Mr. Manfredi. 

283. CONTEMPORARY SOCIOLOGICAL THEORY. Credit, 3. Mr. Gordon. 
2Gk. CCITEMPORASS SOCIOLOGICAL THEORY. Credit, 3. Mr. Gordon. 
293. AjV.\:*7£D RESEARCH METHODS. Credit, 3. The Staff. 

299. INTERNSHIP. Credit, % The Staff. 

300, THESIS, Master's Degree,* Credit, 10, 
1;00. THESIS, Ph*D. Degree. Credit, 30 



COURSES OPEN TO BOTH GRADUATE AMD UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 
(For either major or minor credit) 

151. URBAN SOCIOLOGY, Credit, 3. Mr. Lovald. 

152. RURAL SOCIOLOGY. Credit, 3. Mr. Lovald. 

156. RACE RELATIONS. Credit, 3. Mr. Korson 

157. THE FAiULY. Credit, 3. Mr. King. 
161. POPULATION PROBLEMS. Credit, 3. 

170. SOCIAL STRUCTURE OF INDIA. Credit, 3. Mr. Driver. 

175. SOCIAL PROBLEMS. Credit, 3* Mr. Driver. 

192. INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL WELFARE. Credit, 3. Mr. Yablonsky. 

195, 196, SEMINAR. Credit, 3. Mr. Lovald. 

ANTHROPOLOGY 

COURSES OPEN TO GRADUATE STUDENTS 
ONLY 
(For either major or minor 
credit) 

136. INDIVIDUAL AND SOCIETY, Credit, 3* Mr. Lopreato. 

137. THEORY IN SOCIAL ANTHROPOLOGY, Credit, 3. Mr. Conant. 

COURSES OPEN TO BOTH GRADUATE AND UNDERGRADUATE 

STUDENTS 
(For either major or minor credit) 

163. SOCIAL ANTHROPOLOGY. Credit, 3. Mr. Wilkinson and Mr. Conant. 

16k. PROBLE;S IN ANTHROPOLOGY, Credit, 3. Mr. Conant. 

165. TOMOGRAPHIC SURVEY OF NON-LITERATE PEOPLES. Credit, 3. 

MT. Conant. 
167. ETHNOLOGY OF AFRICA, Credit, 3* Mr. Conant. 

Interdepartmental Courses 

Social Science 160. AFRICA, SOUTH OF THE- SAHARA. Credit 3. 

Miss Carter, 
Social Science 169. INDIA AND SOUTHEAST ASIA. Credit, 3« 

Mr. Driver. 



i« Henry Korson , Ph.D. Yale University 

Teaching Experienc e: Instructor, New York University, 1941-42; Bowdoin College, 
1942-44, Assistant Professor, University of Massachusetts 1944-48; Professor, 
1948 -; Head of Department, 1950 -, 

Voting Professor. Mt. Holyoke College, 1950-51; Spring, 1961; Kwansei Gakuin 
University, Nishinomyia, Japan, 195?. 

Memberships : Fellow, American Sociological Association 

Fellow, American Association for the Advancement of Science 
Eastern Sociological Society 

American Academy of Political and Social Science 
Association for Asian Studies 

Grants : Asia Foundation Grant, 1957-58; University of Massachusetts Research 
Council Grant 1958-1959, 

Articles : 

1. "Looking For Work," Chapter IX in E. Wight Bakke, The Unemployed Worker, 
Yale University Press, New Haven, 1940. 

2. "Unemployment Modifies the Workers' Techniques, " Chapter XI in E. Wight 
Bakke, Citizens W ithout Work, Yale University Press, New Haven, 1940. 

3. "The Social Sciences," The 'Will 1st on Bulletin, Spring 1959. 

4. "Decision Making Among Japanese University Seniors," (in Process) 

5. "Social Mobility Among Japanese Alumni," (In Frocess) 

Book Reviews 

1. Talcott Parsons, Essays in Sociological Theory, Pure and Applied , Free 
Press, Glencoe, Illinois, 1949, in Amherst Alumni News, Vol. II, July, 
1949, no. 1, p. 21 

2« The Scanlon Plan . A Frontier in Labor -Management Coo peratio n, Ed. by 

Frederick G. Lesiuer, A Publication of the industrial Relations Section, 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology. New York, John Wiley & Sons, 
New York, 1958. In The American Sociological Review , Vol. 24, no. 4. 

Other: Abstracter: Socio logi cal Abstracts , 1953-57. 



£• Wendell King, Ph. D„ Yale University 

Teaching Experience: Instructor, Yale University 1943-46; Assistant Professor 
to Associate Frofessor Collins College, 1946-52; Assistant Professor, University 
of Massachusetts, 1952-54; Associate Professor 1954-56; Professor 1956- 

Visiting Lecturer : Smith College, Fall, 1952-53. 

Memberships : Fellow, American Sociological Association, Eastern Sociological 
Association, Society for Applied Anthropology. 

Books: 

Social Movements in the Unit ed States : Random House. 1956. 
Articles : 

1. "Social Cleavage in a New England Community," Social Forces . Vol. 24, No. 3> 
1945. 

2. "Nurse-Worker Communication: Some Sociological Considerations," American 
Association of Industrial Nurses Journal . Vol. 7, No. 8, 1959. 

Book Reviews : 

1. "The Prohibition Movement in California, 1848-1933" by Gilman M. Ostrander, 
American Sociological Review , Vo. 23, No. 4, 1958* « 

2. "Building a Successful Marriage by Judson and Mary Landis, " American Sociol- 
ogical Review , Vol. 24, No. 4, 1959. 

Awards: Recipient of National Institutes of Health Fellowship to the Inter- 
University Council's Institute for Social Gerontology, summer of 1958. 

Grants : Recipient of University of Massachusetts Research Council Grant for a 
study of the "The Changing Roles of the Aged," 1958, 

Recipient of a research grant from the Society for the Investigation of Human 

Ecology to undertake field work for a study of Social Change in Jamaica, West 

Indies, This work was done while on sabbatical leave during the academic year 

1959-60. 

Recipient of University of Massachusetts Research Council Grant to continue 

analysis of the Jamaican materials with a view to publication of a series of 

articles, Jan. 1961. 



Milton M. Gordon- (will join the department as a Professor of Sociology in 
September, 1961) 

Resent Status (1960-61): Fellow of the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation. 

College honors : Phi Beta Kappa; prizes in public speaking; Class of '75 Prize 
in American history; degree awarded magna cum laude, with "Highest Honors in 
Economics and Sociology;" awarded Charles Carroll Everett Scholarship by Bowdoin 
for post-college work. 

Graduate Degree : M.A. Columbia University, 1940; Ph.D. Columbia University, 1950. 

Prizes : 194# - awarded first prize of ^2500 for manuscript, "Democracy and Group 
Relations; " in national contest sponsored by the Institute for Religious and 
Social Studies. 

Employment: Instructor in Sociology, University of Pennsylvania, 1946-50; 
Assistant Professor of Sociology, Drew University, 1950-53; Assistant Professor 
of Sociology, Haverford College, 1953-1957 (simultaneously, Visiting Lecturer in 
Sociology and Anthropology, Bryn Mawr College, 1956-57); member of staff, Rustell 
Sage Foundation, carrying out commissioned research and writing, 195&~59; Visiting 
Associate Professor of Sociology, vtfellesley College, 1957-53 (simultaneously, 
Visiting Associate Professor of Sociology, Brown University, 2nd semester, 1957- 
58. * and 1959-60). 

Papers read at Professional Meeting: Eastern Sociological Society, 1949, 1951, 
1952, 1954; American Sociological Society, 1955. 

Memberships - Fellow, American Sociological Association; Eastern Sociological 
Society. 

Books : 

Social Class in American Sociology (Durham, N.C., Duke University Press, 1958). 

Assimilation of Ethnic Groups in The United States , Russell Sage Foundation, 
(forthcoming) 

The Girard College Case, (forthcoming) 

Contributions to Books : 

"Social Structure and Goals in Group Relations," In Morroe Berger, Theodore Abel, 
and Charles H. Page (eds.), Freedom and Control in Modern Society (New York: 
D. Van Nostrand Co., 1954), pp. 141-57. 

"The Class Personality," in Samuel Koenig, Rex D. Hopper, and Feliks Gross (eds.)., 
Sociology , A Book of Readings (New York: Prentice-Hall, Inc., 1953). (Reprint) 

"The Price of Prejudice," in E. B. Lee and A. McC. Lee, Social Problems in America 
(New York: Henry Holt and Co., 1955). (Reprint) 

"Assimilation," in Theodore I. Lenn (ed.), Workbook and Readings in Sociology 
(New York: Appleton, Century, Crofts, 1956), pp. 306-07. (Reprint) 



. 



Milton M. Gordon 

Articles : 

1. "Qualification of the Marginal Man Theory," American Sociological Review, 
Vol, VI, No. 1 (Feb, 1941), 52-58. 

2. "Propaganda and the Polls," The Progressiv e, Vol. 9, No. 33 (Aug. 13, 1945), 
pp.4, 10. 

3. "Sociological Law and the Deviant Case," Sociometry, Vol. X, No. 3 (Aug. 1947), 
250-58. 

4. "The New Liberalism of the Church," Phylon, Vol. 8, No. 3 (Third quarter, 1947), 
239-42. 

5. "The Concept of the Sub-Culture and Its Application," Social Forces , Vol. 26 
No, 1 (Oct. 1947), 40-42, 

6. "Kitty Foyle and the Concept of Class as Culture, " African Journal of Sociology , 
Vol. 53, No. 3 (Nov. 1947), 210-17. 

7. "Social Class in American Sociology," American Journal of Sociology . Vol. 55, 
No. 3 (Nov. 1949), 262-68. 

8. A System of Social Class Analysis," Drew University Studies . No. 2 (Aug. 1951), 
1-19. 

9. "The Logic of Socio-Economic Status Scales," Sociometry . Vol, XV, No. 3-4 
(Aug. Nov. 1952), 342-53, 

10. "Segregation - Two-Edged Sword" (with John P. Roche), The New York Times 
Magazine , April 25, 1954, pp. 10, 62-64. 

11, "Social Class and American Intellectuals," American Association of University 
Professors Bulletin . Vol. 40, No. 4 (Winter 1954-55), 517-28. 

12.. "Can Morality Be Legislated?" (with John P. Roche), The New York Times 
Magazine , May 22, 1955, pp. 10, 42-49. 

13, "The Girard College Case: Desegregation and a Municipal Trust," The Annals 
2£ tb J. American Academy of Political and Social Science , Vol. 304 (March 1956) 
53-61, 

14. The Girard College Case: Resolution and Social Significance, " Social Problems 
Vol. 7, No. 1 ( Summer, 1959), 15-27. 



2fe25&s 0. Uilkinson, Ph.D. Columbia University 

Reaching Experience ; Instructor, University of Massachusetts l°53-57, Assistant 
Professor 1957-59; Associate Professor, 1959-present. 

XisiUng lecturer: Mount Holyoke College, Fall, 1954$ Spring 195o; Spring, 1961. 
Monographs: 

]£&££M Irbajiyation, Columbia University, Bureau of Applied Social Research (1952). 

Demographic Indices of the grid 's Urban Population, Columbia University, Bureau 
of Applied Social Research (1953) » with Rogoff, et al . 

The World's Metropolitan Areas. University of California Press (1959), with Davis, 
et a 1 . 

A rticles : 

1. n Prosperityand Political Victory,' 5 Public Opinion Q uarterly , Vol. 14, #2 
(Summer, 1950) with Hornell Hart. 

2. "The Pattern of Korean Urbanization/' Rural Sociology , Vol. 19, #1 (March, 195*0. 

3. "Urban Structure and Industrialization," American Sociological Review, Vol. 
25, #3 (June, I960). ■■ , „ ■ 

4. "Agricultural ism in the City of Tokyo, 5 ' Rural So ciology (March, 19ol.) 
Reviews: 

1. Oeser & Hammond (eds.), Social Structure & Personality in a Citv_ in the Annals, 
Vol. 300 (July, 1955). 

2. United Nations, The, Future Growth of Uorld Population, American Sociological 
Review (December, 1959). 

3. United Nations, Recent Trends in Fertility in Industrialized Countries , Ameri- 
can Sociological Review' (December" 195?TT^ 

4. Mai thus, T., Huxley, J., and Osborn, F., On Popu lation: Three Essays, N.Y. 
American Library, 1°60. American Sociological Review, Vol. 26, „'-l, Feb., 
1?61, p. 171. 

5. Weinberg, M., Issues in Social Science, N. Y,, Prentice-Hall, 1959. American 
Sociological Review, Vol". 26, .fl, Feb. 1961, p. lo3» 

6. Halbwachs, Popu lation and „Sqcietx, American So ciologic al Review, (forthcoming) 

7. Schuler, et al.", Readi ngs in" Sociology, " ?? « 

8. Young & Mack, Principles of Sociology, " " 

9. Taeuber, The Populat ion oFT apan , in "American Journal of Sociology, (forthcoming) 

In Progres s: I'onograph: Urbaniz ation in Japan 

Articles: f 'A Functional Classification of Japanese Cities, 1955"' 
"Industrialization and Family Institutions in Japan" 

Grants : Research Fellow, Institute for Urban Research, University of California 
Berkeley, 1957-58, Population Council grant, 1958-59, University of Massachusetts 
Research Council grant, 1960-61. 

Other: Editorial Staff, American Sociological Review, 1953-60. 



m WMt—pW— 



£ewis Yablonsky , Ph.D. New York University 

Teaching Ex^erj^nce s Lecturer, College of the City of New York 1952-58; 
nolo ,i a Universit y l°56-58s Assistant Professor, University of Massachusetts 
1958-59; Associate Professor 1959- 

&P|£S £epfgssor i Smith College, Spring, I960; Harvard University fall 
19c0-cl. 

Book ; 

The Violent Gang: An Analysis of Delinquent Gangs and Gang Warfare, Accepted 
for publication by MacMillan Co. 

Public ations; 

1. r: A Sociometric Investigation into the Development of an Experimental Model 
for Small Group Analysis,* 5 Sociometry (November 1952). 

2. "An Operational Theory of Roles," Sociometry (November 1953). 

3. 'Future-Projection Technique," Group Psychothera py (December 1954). 

4. -Preparing Parolees for Essential Social Roles," Group P sychotherapy 
( April 1955). 

5. ,: ith J. L. Moreno, "Progress in Psychodrama, " in Progress in Clinical 
Psychology (edited by Brower and Abt), New York? Grune-Stratton, 1956. 

6. "The Sociometry of the Dyad," in So ciom etry and the Science of Man 
(edited by J. L. Koreno), New York: Beacon House, Inc., 195^7 

?. With Clarence Sherwood, Crime Prevention on Morningside Heights , New York: 
Mornings ide Heights, Inc., 1956. 

8, With James Enneis, "Psychodrama Theory and Practice/' in Progress in 
Psyc hotherapy (edited by J. L. Moreno), New York? Grune-Stratton, 1956. 

9. With Clarence Sherwood, A Parent -Counselling Project , New York? Morningside 
Heights, Inc., 1956. 

10. "Toward a Code of Ethics for Group Psychotherapists," Group Psychotherapy , 
(February 1958) 

11. "Applications of Group Psychotherapy to the Crime Problem," Proceedings, 

' Interna tional Congress of Psychotherapy , University of Barcelona, Spain, 1958. 

12. "An Appraisal of Approaches to the Prevention and Control of Juvenile 
Delinquency in New York State with some Conclusions and Recommendations 
for Needed Action." Rockefeller Bros. Organization, New York, 1958 
(Kimeographed report). 

13. "Group Psychotherapy and Psychodrama for Drug Addicts," Nationa l Probation 
and Parole Asso ciation Journal (January 1959). 



Lewis Yablonsjg r 
Publications : Continued 

14. -An Open Letter to Officers and Members of the American Society of Group 
Psychotherapy- (Presidential Statement), Group Psyc ho the rapy , June, 1°59. 

15. ri The Delinquent Gang as a Near-Group" Social Proble ms. Fall, 1959. 

16. 'Correction and the Doing-Time Society,' 7 Federal Probation, March 19o0. 

1?. * m he Sociopathology of the Violent Gang and Its Treatment,'' chapter in 

volume Progress in Psychotherapjr (edited by J. L. Moreno and J. Masserman) 
New York: Grune-Stratton, I960. 

18, "The Violent Gang," Commentary, August 1960. 

Book Reviews : 

1. Void, "Theoretical Criminology" in Group Psychoth erapy 

2. Moreno and Masserman, "Psychotherapy, rt Vol. Ill, Group Psychotherapy 

3. Nice, "Crime & Insanit y" in Vol. Ill Group Psychotherapy 

4. Bonner, "Group Dynamics" in Vol. Ill, Grou p Psychotherapy 

5. McCord & McCord, "Origins of Crime" in American Soc iologi cal Review, Feb. I960 

6. Barnes and Teeters, "New Horizons in Crim inol ogy " in Americ an Sociological 
Review (December, 1959) 

?. Knowles, "Introduction to Groups Dynamics" in American Sociological Review 
Oct., I960. ~ ~ ~ ~ 

8. Fen ton, " The Prisoner's Family " in American Sociologica l Review, Oct. I960, 

9. Gallagher and Harris, "Emotional Problems of Adolescents" of U. of Mass . 
Alumnus, Fall, I960. 

10. The United Nations, The Selection of Offenders for Probation , N.Y. United 
Nations, 1°59, International Documents Service, Columbia University Press. 
American Sociological Review, Vol. 26, #2, April, 1961, pp. 322-3. 

11. Savitz, Leonard D., Delinq uency and Migration , Commission on Human Relations, 
City of Philadelphia, I960. American Sociologica l Review , Vol. 2o, #2, 
April, 1961, p. 322. 

Publications Positions : 

Contributing Editor, Sociometry, 1952-55 

Associate Editor, Book Review Editor, Group Psy chotherapy , 1952 - present 



Lewis Yablonsky 
Other t 

mmmmmr rmu ■mm 

1. Director, Crime Prevention Program, Morningside Heights; New York City, N. Y, 

1953-58. 

2. Research associate, N. Y. University Highfields, Project, (Institutionalized 

delinquents) l?4?-52. 

3. President, American Society of Group Psychotherapy, 1959-60 

4. Consultant, Rockefeller Brothers (Analysis of Juvenile Delinquents Control 

in N. Y. State) 

Awards : 

DeRoy Award, 1959, for "Best Paper on Social Problem - Oriented Research.'' 
Presented by the Society for the Study of Social Problems. 



Edwin P. Driver, Ph.D. University of Pennsylvania 

Teaching Experience ; Instructor, University of Massachusetts, 1948-54; Assistant 
Professor 195^-5? 5 Associate Professor 1959 - Visiting Lecturer: Smith College, 
1960-61. 

Award: Fulbright Lecturer, Nagpur University, Nagpur, India, 1957-58; Acting 
Director, Seminar in American History and Culture, Andhra University, May 1958. 

Articl es: 

!• 0" minology . Publication of the Bureau of Government Research University 
of Massachusetts, 1950. 

2. "Charles Buckman Goring: Pioneer in Criminology 1 ', Jl. Crim . Law & Crimin ., 
Jan-Feb. 1957. Reprinted as Chap. 17 in H. Mannheim, Pionee rs in "Criminology , 
London: Spencer, I960, pp. 335-348. 

3* Administr ative Adjudication of Deviant Conduct of Phys icians iji New York and 
Massachusetts : A Study" in "Social Control. "^Uni v. of Michigan" Microfilm 
Series, 1957. 

4. ''Methodology in the Study of Crimer Causation and Criminal Law 1 ", Sociological 
Bulletin , March 1958. 

5. "Fertility Differentials Among Economic Strata in Central India,' Eugenics 
Quarte rly, June I960. 

6. "Interaction and Criminal Homicide in Central India", Social Forces, 1961 
(in press) 

Monograph 

Differential Fertility in Central India: A Field Study, Approx. 200 pp. will be 
completed in June, 1^61. Tin process! 

Book Revie ws: 

1. H. E. Barnes and N. Teeters, "New Horizons in Criminology", 1951 > <&• Grim. 
Law & Crimin ., June -July 1956. 

2. H. Jones, "Crime and the Penal System," 1956, Jl. Crim. Law & Crimin ., June- 
July 1956. 

3. J. Jersild, "Boy Prostitution", 1956, Jl. Crim . Law & Crimin., June-July 1956. 

4. U. N. Secretariat, Bureau of Social Affairs, "International Review of Programs 
of Social Development, 1959", American Sociological Review , December 195?. 

5. Society for Psychological Study of Social Issues, "The Role of the Social 
Sciences in Desegregation: A Symposium, 1958," American Sociological Review, 
June 1959. 

6. S. Nataragan, "A Century of Social Reform in India," 1959, A merican Sociologi- 
cal Revi ew, August I960. 



Mr. Driver 

?. J. C. Mathur & P. Neurath, "An Indian Experiment in Farm Radio Forum, 1959, ' 
American Sociological He view . Oct. I960. 

8. S. P. Hayes, "Measuring the Results of Development Projects; A Manual for 
the Use of Field Workers," 1959, American Sociological Review, Oct. I960. 



Cr\ n 



9. C. ¥. Topping, "Crime and You, I960, American Sociological Review, Oct. I960. 

10. United Nations, Bureau of Social Affairs, International Review of Criminal 
Policy," American Sociological Review, Oct. I960. 

Grants: Population Council, 1958-59; 1959-60; University of Massachusetts 
Research Council, 1958, I960, 1961. 

Other : Editorial Staff, America n Sociological Review, 1958-60. 



John F. Manfred!, Ph.D. Harvard University 

Teaching Experience : Instructor, University of Massachusetts, 1948-56; Assistant 
Professor, 1956-; Visiting Lecturer, Sir George Williams College, Montreal, 
summer, 1950; Visiting Lecturer, Ft. Holyoke College, 1950, 1957. 

Memberships: American Sociological Society, Eastern Sociological Society, 

Grant: University of Massachusetts Research Council Grant, I960. 

Artic les; 

1. "Immigration to Northampton" in The Northampton Book, ed., L. E. Uikander, 

H. U. Faulkner, H. C. B. Ford, E. C. Rozwenc, and E. C. Shepard, Northampton, 
Massachusetts, 195^, pp. 331-336. 

2. "Religious Sectarianism in the United States,"' a demographic study, (in process) 

3. "Societal Complexity and the Limitation of Alternatives," (in process) 
Book Review: 

t-»» «> ^W» ■■■■ — —II ■■» 

1. Manis, J. G., and Clark, S. I., Editors, Man and Society, N. Y., Macmillan 
Co., I960. American Sociological Review , Vol. 267^3, April, 1961, p. 338. 



Francis P. Conant , Ph. D., Columbia University 

Teaching Experience : Lecturer, Columbia University, 1956-7; Lecturer, Hunter 
College, I960; Assistant Professor, University of Massachusetts, I960-. 

Grants ; Ford Foundation Fellow, field work in Northern Nigeria, 1957-59; American 
Anthropological Association - Smith, Kline and French Fund, 1956-9; American 
Museum of Natural History Grant, 1957-9; University of Massachusetts Faculty 
Research Grant, I960-. 

Books : With H. D. Gunn, Pagan Peoples of the Middle Niger Region of Northern 
Nigeria , International African Institute, London. I960. 

Dodo at Pass : A Study of a Pagan Religion in Northern N igeria , Doctoral disser- 
tation, Columbia University, New York, and University Microfilms, Ann Arbor, 
Michigan, I960. 

Articles : 

1. "Dependent Peoples," International Conciliation , No. 504, pp. 58-88, 1955. 

2. "The Sahara," Natural History, LXIII, No. 9, pp. 392, et so,., 1954. 

3. "The Nile," The New York Times Magazine , 10 Oct. 1954, pp. 14 et sq. 
4« 1948-1952, newspaper articles on the topics of the Finnish Communist 

Party, Finnish national elections, and Finno-Russian post-war relations. 
These were published in the Des Moines R egiste r and Tribune , Dallas Morning 
News, and Christian Science Monitor . The articles were a by-product of 
research into the German, Russian, and Finnish campaigns in Lappland and 
Karelia during World War II. As newsman for United Press (1952-1953), consi- 
derable copy was written for the national radio news service (NY Bureau). 

5. "The Ritual Use of Rock Gongs in Northern Nigeria," in Transactions of the 
New York Academy of Sciences , December, I960. 

6. "Some Political and Social Implications of the Kin System of Address Among 
the Northern Nigerian s." Anthropological Linguistic s, Dec. I960 

7. "Shallow-depth Archaeology: A Bridge Between African Pre-History and History," 
^ Proceedings of the New York Academy of Sciences , to be published, probably 
in July/August 1961, (forthcoming) 

8. "The Political Uses of Pagan Ritual." To be submitted to Africa , quarterly 
journal of the *toyal iinthropological Institute. (In process) 

9. "Some Uses of the Rock Gong in Northern Nigeria." To be submitted to Man, 
Monthly Journal of the ^oyal Anthropological Institute. (In process) 

* 

Book Reviews : 

!• Col lections Ethnographiques : Touareg Ahaggar, Balout, Bovis, Gast, et al., 
Reviewed in American Anthropologist , V. 62, No. 5, October, I960, p. 906, 

2. A Ha ndbook of the African Collections of the Commercial Museum , Philadelphia. 
fl.o" American Anthropologist , (forthcoming) 

3 . Second Conference on African History and Prehistory in Man, Monthly Journal 
of "the Royal Anthropological Institute of Great Britain & Ireland, 
(forthcoming) 



Joseph Lopreato . Ph. D., Yale University 

Teaching Experience: Assistant Professor, University of Massachusetts 1960- 

Memberships: American Sociological Association, Eastern Sociological Associa- 
tion, Society for Applied Anthropology 

Articles : 

1. Joseph Lopreato & Domenico Lococo, "Stefanaconi: un villaggio agricolo 
Meridionale in relazione al suo mondo." Quaderni di Sociologia (Turin, 
Italy, No. 3k, Autumn, 1959. 

2. Joseph Lopreato, "Social Stratification and Mobility in a Small Italian 
Town," American Sociological Review , (forthcoming, Aug, 1961) 

3» _. i "Social Classes in an Italian Farm Village," Rural Sociology, 

(forthcoming, 1961 ) 

In Process 

1* "Economic Development and Cultural Change: The Hole of Emigration." 

2. "The Measurement of Social Mobility." 

Grant: University of Massachusetts Research Council Grant, 1961, for project: 
"The Role of Emigration in Social Change," 



Keith A. Lovald , Th. D f> University of Minnesota 

Teachi ng Experience : Assistant Professor, Jamestown College, 1956-57; South 
Dakota State College, 1957-585 Assistant Professor, University of Massachusetts, 
I960-. 

Membership : American Sociological Association, Midwest Sociolgical Society, 
Articles : 

1. With Theodore Caplow and Samuel Wallace, A Genera l Report on the Problem of 
Relocating the Population of the Lower Loop Redevelopment Area , Minneapolis 
Housing ana Redevelopment Authority, 1958. 

2. Keith Lovald, "The Social Life of the Aged Homeless Man in Skid Row," Proceed^ 
ings of the Fifth Internationa l Congress of Geronotology , 1961 (Forthcoming) 

In Frogress : 

F^om Hobohemia to Skid Row ; The Changing Community of the Homeless Man. 



: 






Mrs. Mary E. W. Goss, Ph. D., Columbia University. Research Associate, . 

College of Medicine s Cornell University. 

Awards: University Merit Scholarship, State University of Iowa, 1946-47 Gilder 
Fellow, Columbia University, 1951-52. 

Memberships: Phi Beta Kappa, American Sociological Association, Eastern Sociolo- 
gical Society, American Academy of Political and Social Science, American Assoc- 
iation for the Advancement of Science , American Public Health Association. 

Professional Positions Held 

Past : 

Research Assistant in Sociology, State University of Iowa, 1947-48 

Research Assistant in Political Science, Amherst College, 1949 

Instructor in Sociology, kmith College 1949-50 

Instructor in Sociology, University of Massachusetts, 1950-51; 1955-56 

Research Associate, bureau of Applied Social Research, Columbia University, 

1952-53. 

Member of Editorial Staff American Sociological Review , 1957-60 

Present : 

Consultant in Sociology, Comprehenxive Care and Teaching Program, New York 
Hospital - Cornell Medical Center, 1957- Research Associate in Sociology, 
Department of Medicine, Cornell, University Medical College 1959- Associate 
Editor, American Sociological Review, 1960- 

Publi cations and Reports : 

1. "Student Orientations Toward the Cornell Comprehensive Care and Teaching 
Program," (with Selvin, Kendall, and Davies), New York: Bureau of Applied 
Social Research, Columbia University, 1953. (mimeographed, 155pp») 

2. "Student Experiences in the Cornell Comprehensive Care and Teaching Program," 
(with Cooperstock, Davies, and Kendall), New York: Bureau of Applied Social 
Research, Columbia University, 1954. (dittoed, 90pp.) 

3. "Collaboration Between Sociologist and Physician," (with George G. Reader), 

Social Problems, 4 (July, 1956), pp. 82-89. 

4. "Change in the Cornell Comprehensive Care and Teaching Program," in Merton, 
Reader, and Kendall, The Student-Physician , Cambridge: Harvard University 
Press, 1957, pp. 249-270." 

5. "The Sociology of Medicine," (With Reader), in Merton, Broom, and Cottrell, 
Jr., So ciology Today , New York: Basic Books, 1959, pp. 229-246. 

6. "Ihysicians in Bureaucracy: A Case Study of Professional Pressures on 
Organizational Roles," (Abstract), Dissertation Abstracts , 20 (No. 2, 1959), 
p. 1087. 

7. "Medical Sociology, with Particular Reference to the Study of Hospitals," 
(with Reader), in Transa ct ions of the Fourth World Con fir ess of Sociology , 
London: International Sociological Association, 1959, vol. 2 pp. 139-152. 



Mrs. Goss 

8. "Report on Sociology of Jyiedicine Discussion Section," in Transactions of 
i5? fourth World Congress of Sociology . London: International Sociological 
Association (in press), Vol. 3, 

9. "Influence and Authority among Physicians in an Outpatient Clinic," Ameri- 
can Sociological Review , February, 1961. 

Book Reviews : 

1. judical Sociology; Theory , Scope and Method , by N. G. Hawkins, American 
Sociological Review , 24 (June, 1959), pp. 435-436. 

2# Patients , Physicians and Illness , ed. by E. G. Jaco, American Sociological 
Review , 24 (December/ 1959), pp. 910-911. 

3« Medical Care Needs and Services in the Boston Metropolitan Area , by L. S. 
Rosenfeld, J. Katz, and A. Donabedian, /merican Sociological Review . 24 
(October, 1959), p e 743. 

k* P robl ems in Intercultu ral Health Programs , by G. M. Foster, America n 
Sociological Review, 24 (October, 1959) f>» 748. 

5. Rea dings in Medical Care , by the Committee on Medical Care Teaching of the 
Association of Teachers of Preventive Medicine, .American Sociological 
Review, 25 (Feb., I960), p. 151. 

6» Comprehensive Medical Services Under Voluntary He alth In surance , by B, J. 
Darsky, N, Sinai, and 3. J. Axelrod, American Sociological Review , 25 
(August, 1960); pp. 612-613. 

7« Liberal Education in the Professions , and The Graduate S chool and the Decline 
of Liberal Education , by E, J, McGrath, American Sociological Review , (in 
press). 

8. Recent Contributions of Biological and Psychosocial Investigations to Pre - 
ventive Psychiatry , ed. by R. H. Ojemann, American Sociological Review , 25 
(October, I960), pp. 785-786. 

9« Patterns of Professional Education , by W. J. McGlothlin, American Socio- 
logical Review, Vol. 26, Mo. 2, April, 1961, pp. 324-5 w 



COMMITTEE 



1 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FINANCE 
May 5, 1961, 10:30 a.m., Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston 

Chairman Healey presiding 



PRESENT ; Trustees Healey, Brett, Cash in, 
Hoftyzer, Pumphret, President 
Lederle, Secretary Gillespie and 
Treasurer Johnson 

The committee reviewed the auditor's report and noted 
his various comments. The Treasurer was directed to send to the 
Attorney General for purposes of collection, accounts receivable 
outstanding for more than one year with the notation as to which 
accounts can probably be collected by the University and which 
should be handled by the Attorney General. 

The need for an investment counsel was discussed. On 

motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
they engage the services of Standish Ayer 
and McKay, Inc. as investment counsellors 
at $1,000 per year paid on quarterly installments 
and cancelable at the end of any quarter. 

It was 

VOTED : To confirm the verbal vote of the Finance 
Committee of April 11, 1961 authorizing 
the use of 600 American Telephone and 
Telegraph Company rights and $2580 for the 
subscription to 30 shares of American 
Telephone and Telegraph common stock. 

It was 

VOTED : To use the "general purpose" bequest of 

$1,000 from Joseph W. Bartlett to establish 
a Joseph W. Bartlett Student Loan Fund and 
to use the principal and income from this 
fund for matching funds under the National 
Defense Student Loan Program provided that 
when the National Defense Student Loan Pro- 
gram no longer is in need of said fund, they 
shall be returned to the Joseph W. Bartlett 
Student Loan Fund. 



2289 



Inves tment 

Counsel 

Service 



Shares 



Joseph W. 
Bartlett 
Student 
Loan Fund 



2290 



COMMITTEE 



Seymour Israel 
Barowsky 
Scholarship 
Fund 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



It was 

VOTED : To establish the Seymour Israel Barowsky 
Scholarship Fund as an endowment fund of 
the University with a gift of $5,000 from 
Mr. and Mrs. Jacob L. Barowsky and family. 
The income from this fund is to be used 
in accordance with the terms of the gift 
for a scholarship for: 

1. A student from Holyoke, Massachusetts. 

2. If no student from Holyoke is available, its 
is then to be given to a student from the 
Holyoke-Springf ield area. 

3. If no student is available from either of the 
above two, then it may be granted to any 
student the Scholarship Committee considers 
worthy . 

4. High scholastic standing need not be a 
condition of the grant. 

At the next meeting of the Finance Committee, it was 
agreed that the committee will consider a policy on financing trust 
fund research. 

The meeting adjourned at 12:10 p.m. 



<v 





ohn Gillespie 
Secretary of the University 




\ 



COMMITTEE 



! 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FINANCE 

June 29, 1961, 4:00 p.m., Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston 

Chairman Healey presiding 

PRESENT : Trustees Healey, Brett, Cashin, Fox, Hoftyzer, 
Pumphret, President Lederle, Treasurer Johnson, 
Provost Woods ide, Assistant Secretary Doolan; 
also, Mr. Herman Pike and Mr. John Wood of 
Standish, Ayer & McKay, Inc. 

Chairman Healey called upon Mr. Pike of Standish, Ayer & 
McKay, Inc. , to explain more completely to the Committee the report 
of the investment counsel which had been distributed to them. Mr. 
Pike amplified the statement of the recommendations regarding the 
balance to be maintained in the portfolio along with his suggestions 
of approach to the situation. There was a general discussion 
regarding the holdings of bonds, preferred and common stock, plus 
the use of the uninvested capital. 

Upon recommendation of investment counsel, and on motion 

duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED ; That the 100 Pacific Gas & Electric "rights 11 be 
sold at the market. 

Upon recommendation of the investment counsel, and on 

motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : That the portfolio distribution as outlined in the 
recommendations of Standish, Ayer & McKay, Inc. , 
on June 27, 1961 be established at approximately 
50.5% of the portfolio in common stocks. 

On motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To authorize Standish, Ayer & McKay, Inc. , of 
Boston, acting for the Trustees, to sell the 
following securities: 



2291 



Inves tment 

Counsel 

Report 



Pacific Gas & 
Electric n Rights' 



Portfolio 
Distribution 



Proposed 
Portfolio 



J 



2292 



COMMITTEE 



Buy and Sell 
Authorization 



Trust Fund 

Interest 

Account 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

$2,000 Gen. Tire & Rubber 4 3/4, 1981 
1,000 Indiana Limestone 4, 1975 
1,000 Missouri Pacific RR 4 1/4, 1990 
1,000 Missouri Pacific RR 4 1/4, 2005 

200 Shs. American Sugar Refining Pfd. 
80 Shs. Duquesne Light 4% Pfd. 

500 Shs. Paramount Pictures 

88 Shs. Reliance Insurance 

200 Shs. Tri-Continental Corp. 

250 Shs. Republic Steel 

Treasurer Kenneth W. Johnson is authorized to sign 
the certificates for sale. 

On motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : That Standish, Ayer & McKay, Inc. , be authorized 
to administer the mechanics of the buying and 
selling of the proposed portfolio. 

Following a discussion of the timing in the buy and sell 

decisions regarding the portfolio in the future, the motion was 

duly made and seconded, and it was 

VOTED : That on advice of investment counsel the Chairman 
will attempt to contact all the Committee but will 
have the right to make use of the majority decision 
in the case of buying and selling securities in the 
future. He will make a report of his actions to 
the Full Board of Trustees meetings. 

Treasurer Johnson explained that the Receiving Tellers in 

their handling of over two million dollars in cash during the past 

year had a cash variance of a shortage of $12.06. On motion duly 

made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees to write off the 
cash variance of the Receiving Tellers for the period 
July 1, 1960 to June 29, 1961, in the amount of a 
shortage of $12.06 to the Trust Fund Interest Account. 



The meeting was adjourned— at J*: 55 




jbert 
Assistant Secreta 



'Doolan 

Board of Trustees 



COMMITTEE 



2293 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS & GROUNDS 

July 12, 1961, 10:30 a.m., President's Office, U of M 

Chairman Whitmore presiding 

PRESENT : Trustees Whitmore, Schuck, Pumphret, Cashin, 
Thompson. Also President Lederle, Treasurer 
Johnson, Provost Woods ide, Assistant Secretary 
Doolan, Construction Engineer Hugill, Judge 
Samuel Blassberg part time; Rev. Ewald Mand, 
Mr. Gates and Mr. Strong of the First Baptist 
Church of Amherst, part time. 

Prior to the opening of the meeting, Trustee Pumphret, as 
Chairman of the University of Massachusetts Building Authority, 
officially broke ground for Dormitory B, representing the first two 
buildings now under construction by the Building Authority for the 
University. 

President Lederle presented the organization of the 
Committees for Academic and Physical Planning. The Master Planning 
Committee has met twice to date; the second time the meeting was 
with Hideo Sasaki of Sasaki Walker Associates, Water town, Massa- 
chusetts. The President reported that the Committee was enthusiastic 
about Mr. Sasaki and he was ready to recommend him as a consultant 
to the University for site planning and layout. 

Upon the recommendation of the President, and on motion 

duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that Hideo 
Sasaki of Sasaki Walker Associates, Watertown, 
Massachusetts, be retained as a consultant for 
site planning and layout at the University. 

A general discussion followed relative to architectural 

consultants. It was felt that this area could be left open at this 

time and that possible consultants could be suggested and contacted. 



Master 
Planning 



2294 



COMMITTEE 

Designers - 

Proposed 

Projects 

Men's Physical 

Education 

Building 



Adminis trat ion 
Building 



Coal Handling 
Equipment 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Item A - Men's Physical Education Field. Mr. Johnson 

reported that approximately $600,000 would be available for this 

project. Following a discussion, and upon motion duly made and 

seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 

recommend to the Division of Building Construction, 
Commission on Administration & Finance, that the 
following firms, in order of preference, be con- 
sidered for the design of the Men's Physical 
Education Field. 

1. Gordon E. Ainsworth & Associates, SoutfT 
Deerfield, Massachusetts. 

2. Whitman & Howard, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Item B - Administration Building. Mr. Johnson reported 
that Hall Nichols has set aside planning money for this project. 
A discussion was held relative to the design award for this project. 
It was felt that Campbell & Aldrich should receive consideration as 
the Administration Building is a part of their original study of 
the School of Business and Administration complex. Due to the 
importance of this area, it was suggested that architectural con- 
sultants be used with this project. Upon motion duly made and 
seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 

recommend to the Division of Building Construction, 
Commission on Administration & Finance, that the firm 
of Campbell & Aldrich, Boston, Massachusetts, be the 
designer for the Administration Building in conjunction 
with an architectural consultant. The recommendation 
should further state that the consultant be either 
Pietro Belluschi of Cambridge or Eero Sarrinen of 
New Haven. 

Item C - Coal Handling Equipment. Mr. Johnson explained 

that this is for the purpose of making an engineering study as to 

the relative merits of two railroad proposals for coal handling 

with plans for equipment. Following a discussion, and upon motion • 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 

recommend to the Division of Building Construction, 
Commission on Administration & Finance, that in 
order of preference, the following firms be con- 
sidered for the engineering study of the coal 
handling facilities. 

1. Lockwood- Green, Boston, Massachusetts. 

2. Stone & Webster, Boston, Massachusetts 
Item D - Renovation of Older Buildings. Treasurer 

Johnson explained that this item is for the purpose of making 

studies, preliminary sketches and cost estimates for a number of 

buildings on campus to bring them up to date for current and 

future usage. Following discussion, and upon motion duly made and 

seconded, it was 

VOTED: To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 

recommend to the Division of Building Construction, 
Commission on Administration & Finance, that the 
architectural firm of James A. Britton, Greenfield, 
Massachusetts, do the studies, sketches and cost 
estimates for the renovation of the following build- 
ings: Fernald Hall, Engineering Shops, Goessmann 
Laboratory, Chapel, Marshall Hall, Flint Laboratory, 
Clark Hall, French Hall, West Experiment Station, 
Shade Tree Laboratories and Fisher Laboratory. 

The site for the next dormitories for 1000 students was 

discussed by the Committee and it considered the recommendations of 

the University Master Planning Committee for the location south of 

the Dining Commons. It was reported by the Planning Committee that 

Mr. Sasaki had been consulted on this location and he gave his 

opinion that the site was favorable. As Mr. Sasaki will be the 

consultant on site planning, it was suggested that Mr. Sasaki and 

Hugh Stubbins & Associates be requested to join in a site survey 

for the 1000 student dormitories. Following this survey, the would 



2295 



Renovation of 
Older Buildings 



Dormitories 



2296 



COMMITTEE 



Land 
Acquisition 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

then meet jointly with the Buildings & Grounds Committee of the 
Board of Trustees, the sub-committee of the University of Massa- 
chusetts Building Authority, and the University Master Planning 
Committee. This study and meeting should be accomplished as soon 
as possible. 

Copies of the appraisers report for the DePillis property 
were distributed to the Committee. Judge Blassberg reported that 
the asking price of $14,000 for the property was reasonable and 
upon recommendation of Judge Blassberg, and on motion duly made 
and seconded, it was 

VOTED: To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the 
Committee approve the purchase of the DePillis 
property located at 13 Colony Court, Amherst, 
Massachusetts, for the sum of $14,000. 

Rev. Ewald Mand and Messrs. Gates and Strong then joined the meeting 

as representatives of the First Baptist Church of Amherst. The 

group told the Committee their plan for building a church on North 

Pleasant Street, located on the Walter Jones property. The church 

recently purchased this site (Dalton Diner) which was wanted by the 

University. A full discussion was held between the Committee and 

the group regarding many of the problems involved as well as 

possible solutions to the situation. It was pointed out to the 

group that a new survey of usage of all land on campus was being 

made and that any final decisions must be made by the full Board of 

Trustees.' It was, therefore, recommended to the church group that 

any final decisions be held up until such survey was made and the 

position of the Board of Trustees clarief . The Committee assured 

the church representatives that the Committee and the Board are 

interested in having church facilities adjacent to the campus for 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

use by the students and would keep the group informed as to action 
by the University. 

President Lederle outlined the proposed gift to the Uni- 
versity by the Class of 1961 of the construction of an Information 
Booth at the entrance to the campus. He outlined the action to date 
and suggested that it be considered by the Committee at a future 
meeting when a representative of the Class could be present to 
present the project in more detail. 

President Lederle expressed his concern regarding the 

number of items on the School of Education Building that do not 

meet specifications. After discussion of some of the problems 

involved, and the action taken to date, upon motion duly made and 

seconded, it was 

VOTED ; That no acceptance of the School of Education 

Building be made until all corrections are made 
hy the contractor to meet the plans and specifi- 
cations. 

The final plans for the Men's Physical Education Build- 
ing were displayed by Mr. Hugill for the Committee. After a 
discussion of the plan, and upon motion duly made and seconded, 



it was 



VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the 
final plans and specifications of the Men's 
Physical Education Building be approved subject 
to minor changes. 

The meeting was adjourned at 4:00 p.m. 





tobertr J. Doolan 
Assistant Secretary, Board of Trustees 



2297 



Information 
Booth 



School of 
Education 
Building - not 
accepted 



Men ' s Phys ical 
Education 
Building - plans 



2298 



COMMITTEE 



Dormitories 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS & GROUNDS 
August 15, 1961, 11:00 a.m., Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston 
Chairman Whitmore presiding 



PRESENT : Trustees Whitmore, Brett, Cashin, 
Puraphret, Schuck, also President 
Lederle, Treasurer Johnson, Provost 
Woods ide, Assistant Secretary Doolan, 
Robert Gordon representing the Uni- 
versity Authority, Hideo Sasaki 
representing Sasaki Walker & Associates, 
Inc. , Hugh Stubbins representing Hugh 
Stubbins & Associates. 

As the meeting was called to hear the proposal for loca- 
tion of a new 1,000-student dormitory by Messrs. Sasaki and Stubbins 
the Chairman asked Mr. Stubbins of Hugh Stubbins & Associates to be- 
gin the discussion. Mr. Stubbins gave some general remarks regard- 
ing his visit, along with Mr. Sasaki, to the campus. Following 
this he turned the meeting over to Mr. Sasaki, who presented in more 
detail those specific recommendations that he and Mr. Stubbins felt 
appropriate to the situation. Among the recommendations that 
Mr. Sasaki presented were the following: 

1. Acquire necessary lands at Site B, and accommodate 
1,000 unit program in high-rise tower buildings. 

2. Reorganize program and schedule to develop a con- 
tinuous housing program after a review of the 
Master Plan is made and additional lands are 
acquired. 

3. Reduce housing program of 1,000 units in order 
to utilize Site A to accommodate as many students 
as is possible (approximately 500), consistent 
with good site and architectural design. 

Following the presentation, there was a general discussion 

on site locations and usage of various sites and the following 

factors evolved from the discussion. 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



1. That a high-rise type of dormitory to accommodate 
1,000 students could not be guaranteed for fall 
1963 due to lack of construction and planning 
time - therefore a high-rise type of dormitory 
will not meet the rooming needs for fall 1963. 

2. With this possibility eliminated for that date, 
the next phase must involve some current type of 
dormitory to partially meet the needs for fall 
1963 students. 

Upon motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To abandon the site south of the University 
Dining Commons for dormitory usage to be 
reserved for some other future purpose. 

With the elimination of the Dining Commons site for 

dormitories, it then appeared that a review must be made of the 

campus to determine where a small (500 student or more) dormitory 

could be located to meet some of the student needs for fall 1963. 

To accomplish this, Messrs. Stubbins and Sasaki were requested to 

revisit the campus, review site locations and be prepared in a week 

to ten days to suggest alternate sites for this interim housing 



need. 



It was the general consensus of opinion that the south- 



west corner of the campus should be the next site development for 
dormitories of the high-rise type and it was suggested that the 
purchase of this property be speeded up in order that planning can 
start on that site. The site to the northwest of the campus would 
be the next area to be developed. 



The meeting was adjourned at 1:00 p.m. 




Robert J. Dooian 
Assistant S^retary 
Board of Trustees 




Ue&Cs 









2300 



COMMITTEE 



U Of M 

Building 
Authority 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS & GROUNDS 
September 20, 1961, 12:30 p.m., Univ. of Mass., Amherst 

Chairman Whitmore presiding 



PRESENT : Trustees Whitmore, Cashin, Pumphret, 
Schuck. Also, President Lederle, 
Treasurer Johnson, Provost Woods ide, 
Assistant Secretary Doolan, Hugh 
Stubbins and Peter Woytuk, representing 
Hugh Stubbins & Associates, Richard 
Galehouse, representing Sasaki Walker 
& Associates and Messrs. Rose and Flavin, 
representing Gordon Ainsworth & Associates 

The Chairman asked Mr. Stubbins to present to the Trustee 
Committee and the Building Authority representatives his recommenda- 
tions for the site location for the 1963 dormitories. 

Mr. Pumphret, Chairman of the University Building 
Authority, asked for clarification of the relationship between the 
University Board of Trustees and the Authority regarding the plan- 
ning of the projects undertaken by the Authority. He proposed 
that the architectural committee of the Authority, under Miss 
Schuck, be the group to be the Authority representatives. It was 
agreed that Mr. Pumphret and Miss Schuck would receive copies of 
all correspondence with the architect. 

This meeting was scheduled to include the members of the 
Building Authority Architectural Committee and Miss Schuck stated 
that Judge George Beauregard and Mr. Robert Gordon are the 
committee members. Due to the short notification time, Judge 
Beauregard was unable to change prior commitments and could not 
attend this meeting. Mr. Gordon could not attend as the meeting 
was scheduled on a religious holiday. She assured the committee 
that both gentlemen wished to cooperate in every way to expedite 
the construction of the dormitories. 



i 



COMMITTEE 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

It was further agreed that the architect would submit his 
preliminary sketches and plans to the Authority and the Authority 
would present them to the Trustees. 

Mr. Stubbins said that he felt the site on the top of the 
hill to the east of the campus was a good site and that he could 
build housing for 1,000 students in that area. He pointed out that 
he could not guarantee that all buildings would be completed by 
fall 1963 as this would be influenced by the contractors. He did 
feel that the major portion of the units would be completed. 

A tentative site plan was shown to the committee. It 
occupied an area of approximately 500 feet on each side and con- 
sisted of four building units which could be varied from six to 
seven floors with occupancy ranging from 1,000 to 1,200 students 
for the total project. 

The committee, in its discussion of the plan, agreed that 
it had merit. A question was raised regarding how much orchard 
area would be lost by this construction. Mr. Stubbins felt that 
by judicious planning, very few trees would be lost and that some 
of the young ones might be transplanted. The proximity to the 
President's House was also discussed. Mr. Stubbins said that this 
would also be considered in his planning. 

The architect suggested that the Fisher Laboratory build- 
ing might be removed in order to establish a more open approach to 
the site. However, as the final site location has not been de- 
termined, this decision was left for future discussion. 



2301 



Site 

Location 
for 1963 
Dormitories 



2302 



COMMITTEE 



Architectural 
Consultant 

Adminis t r at ion 
Building 



Land 
Acquisition 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Following the discussion and upon motion duly made and 

seconded, it was 

VOTED ; That it be recommended to the Board of 
Trustees that the area located to the 
east of the President's House and north 
of the Greenough dormitory be designated 
as the site location for the 1,000 stu- 
dent dormitories for fall 1963. 

A suggestion was made that the architect be given some 
freedom in planning the final capacity of the complex within a 
range of 1,000 to 1,200 students. This capacity figure would be 
discussed with the Authority and the Board of Trustees when it was 
determined. 

Upon motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees to 
authorize the Building Authority to 
initiate studies for 1,000 student dormi- 
tories and appropriate other facilities 
for fall 1964 in the area to the south- 
west of the campus. 

And, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees to 
authorize the Building Authority to study 
the location of a Dining Commons within 
the present men's dormitory area of the 
campus. 

Mr. Johnson reported that Pietro Belluschi of Cambridge 
will be delighted to work with the firm of Campbell and Aldrich as 
design consultant on the administrative building project. The con- 
sultant is acceptable to Campbell and Aldrich but must receive the 
approval of the Commission on Administration and Finance. 

Mr. Johnson gave a progress report on the acquisition of 
land adjacent to the campus. He reported that (1) the DePillis 
property has been acquired; (2) the Paresky property has been 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

appraised and an offer made; (3) appraisals have been completed on 
the three tracts of land to the southwest of the campus and 
appraisals are continuing on other properties. 

Mr. Rose of the firm of Gordon Ainsworth & Associates 
gave a status report on the acquisition of agricultural land in the 
South Deerf ield area. He stated that two tracts have been settled 
(Hubbard and Grybco) and that we have 90 and 60 -day options on 
these tracts respectively. The Sumatra Tobacco Company land should 
be settled by the end of this month. Offers have been made on the 
other properties and with one exception look quite favorable. 
Mr. Rose felt that we would be close to the original $123,000 esti- 
mate on these total properties. 

Action on the properties under option was deferred until 
more definitive information is available regarding the Sumatra 
Tobacco Company land. 

The committee made an inspection tour of completed 

projects and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees the 

acceptance of the Education Building, State 
Project U-58-2 as completed in accordance 
with the plans and specifications subject 
to correction of certain details to the 
satisfaction of the Treasurer of the Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts. 

It was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees the 
acceptance of the Addition to the Dining 
Commons, State Project U-59-1 as completed 
in accordance with the plans and specifications 
subject to correction of certain details to 
the satisfaction of the Treasurer of the Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts. 

The committee inspected the new boilers in the Power 

Plant and found that the project was completed in accordance with 



2303 



Agricultural 
Land 

South Deerfield 



Education 
Building 



Addition to 
Dining Commons 



2304 



COMMITTEE 



New 

Boilers - 
Power Plant 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



the plans and specifications and, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board accept the 
new boilers in the University Power 
Plant, Project U-702-7 as completed. 

The meeting was adjourned at 4:45 p.m. 





/~q&h:&*u 




Robert/ J. Doolan 
As sis/ant Secretary 
Board of Trustees 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FINANCE 

September 27, 1961, 11:00 a.m., Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston 

Trustee Healey presiding 

PRESENT : Trustees Healey, Brett, Cashin, Fox, 

Puraphret, President Lederle, Treasurer 
Johnson, Provost Woods ide, Assistant 
Secretary Doolan 

The meeting was called to order by Chairman Healey. 

Treasurer Johnson outlined the scope of the commercial 
accounts for the Trust and Agency Funds being heid by the University 
A summary sheet of the total receipts for the fiscal year July 1, 
1960 to June 30, 1961 (Attachment A) was distributed to the 
committee. The Trust and Agency Funds include all items of income 
other than those listed as State, Federal, Endowment or Student De- 
posits. The estimated monthly balances in the checking account 
(Attachment B) were discussed and Treasurer Johnson recommended that 
a substantial balance could be available for short-term investments. 

The Treasurer stated that he was installing a system of 
cash budgeting and control to determine the amount of surplus 
operating Trust Funds that would be available. 

In the committee discussion, it was decided that the 
Treasurer should proceed with cash budgeting and that the investment 
counselling firm of Standish, Ayer, and McKay, Inc. be asked for 
advice as to proper investments. This may lead to an extension of 
the contract with the Counsel. 

Upon recommendation of the Chairman and on motion duly 

made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer to contact the 
firm of Standish, Ayer & McKay, Inc. for 
the purpose of investing funds from the 
Trust and Agency Accounts not to exceed 
$500,000 for short-term investments. 



2305 



Investment 

Counsel 

Service 



2306 



COMMITTEE 

Centennial 
News Letter 



Trust Fund 

Interest 

Account 



National 
Student 
Defense 
Loans 



Student 
Traffic 
Fines 



Array 
Military 
Property 
Bond 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Upon recommendation of the President and on motion duly 
made and seconded, it was 

VOTED: To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
to authorize the expenditure of $2,500 
from the Trust Fund Interest Account 
for the publication of Centennial news 
letters. 

It was the recommendation of the committee that this 
amount be returned to the Trust Fund Interest Account if Centennial 
Funds become available at a later date. 

The Treasurer reported that we will need an amount of 
$2,800 to meet the matching portion for the National Student Defense 
Loans. We have received $79,200 in Federal Funds and must match 
1/9 of this amount or approximately $8,800. There is $6,000 avail- 
able from other funds. 

Upon recommendation of the Treasurer and on motion duly 

made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
to authorize the Treasurer to use 
$2,800 from the Trust Fund Interest 
Account for matching funds for the 
National Student Defense Loans. 

The Treasurer reported to the committee that considera- 
tion should be given to proper allocation of traffic fines. This 
item was tabled for discussion for subsequent meetings. 

The Treasurer reported that the University was required 
to be bonded at no cost to them for responsibility for military 
property. A change in army regulations requires an increase in the 
bond from 20 to 50% of the value of property under University 
custody. The committee felt that the University should continue 
with this arrangement at the present time. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

TOTAL EXPENDITURES FOR FISCAL TSAR 
JULY 1, I960 to jm% 30* 1961 
(Excludes Capital Outlay App?-epriatl<m) 



State 

Maintenance and Operation 

Special Apprepr iati ons 

Research 1350* 2 i 
Wildlife. 3304-44 



$ 9,^89,715.93 

313,893,45 

31.478.50 

7,683,02 



iviWW{p«>Hi-i 



Sub- Total - Stsf Approp< 



$10,142,772,90 



$ 1,053, 103.15 



Endowment Income 

Scholarships & Fellcwahipa 

Trust funds 

Industrial Research Grmtu 

Federal Research Grants 

Ag«en«y Funds 

Student Deposits 



24,620*18 

83,788.02 

3,-341, 216--47 

.140,163,01 
409*669,47 

240,774,44. 
575,319.83 



' H WWi, W WM t »^|if1 i W W K 



Sub* Total - Trust & Agency Funds 



$ 4»,815, 531,42 



TOTAL 



$16,011,427.4? 



rmti*rrmmm*** t 



t>*M«a» '««ti«i> -<ni.t rM M W »<» nm — i i nw #i mi i— Jn o^iw» m ii'wi ; p m ini«wp6 



Septes&tcr 26 » 1961 



/? 



A 



Mimrnumrf of m»smmmssx^ 

Ifttlaatod Monthly Balances; is 



&g£#nBtg 



* 



Oct 



|p © 



*«Vo 1961 



Dt£* 1961 



ftnginnins 

of 



i.615,88?/ 
1,468,188 
1,234,124 

968^63 



MR 1WWWWM 



S46pt, 1961 $ 886,620 $lv&21 6 862 



&95,610 
221,780 



. & W/"W$, 



^,108,482 

1. 
.,663,796 



•■ ;• i'C,! 






Knd ©I:' 






1. 



3 «• •»»■ ji 



$492 c 595 $1,615*861 



405.,9?8 :i t .468 6 188 



429,674 1 234,124 



467,241 968 D 663 



485,373 1,446*70? 



Tkesft figures tews 



Xn Addition, • Tract and AS***? ta$ A« fetfirag© talk - $476,687*14 



*A»y£oxiaataly $625 ? 595 «f fctel* attottnt &© far »««&#»«* ««a©efe«r g>«^s«isafe« 



I 



8@f£@19»aK' 2ti* 1961 



i 



COMMITTEE 



2307 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Upon recommendation of the Chairman and on motion duly 

made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 

that the Treasurer, Kenneth W. Johnson, 
be authorized to increase the Army ROTC 
Military Property Bond to $600,000.00. 

The meeting was adjourned at 12:15 p.m. 



i 





Rob er t 3. Doo 1 an 
Assistant Secretary 
Board of Trustees 



2308 



COMMITTEE 



Legal 
Counsel 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
September 27, 1961, 12:15 p.m., Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston 

Chairman Boyden presiding 

PRESENT : Trustees Boyden, Brett, Cashin, 
Healey, Whitmore, President 
Lederle, Treasurer Johnson, 
Provost Woods ide, Assistant 
Secretary Doolan 

The President reported that after consultation with the 
Executive Committee, the legal firm of Ely, Bart let t, Brown and 
Proctor of Boston has been selected to act as legal counsel for the 
University of Massachusetts. The counsel must receive the approval 
of the Board of Trustees and the Attorney General's Office. 
Arrangements would be made on a quarterly basic at the rate of 
$2,500 per quarter subject to a mutual review each quarter. 

Upon recommendation of the President and on motion duly 

made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : That the firm of Ely, Bartlett, Brown 
and Proctor of Boston be recommended 
to the Board of Trustees to be selected 
as legal counsel for the University of 
Massachusetts subject to the approval 
of the Attorney General's Office at a 
fee of $2,500 per quarter. 

The meeting was adjourned at 12:30 p.m. 





evt/J/. Doolan 




Assistant Secretary 
Boar d -of Trustees 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON AGRICULTURE AND HORTI- 
CULTURE 

October 10, 1961, 1:00 p.m., Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston 

Trustee Brett presiding 



PRESENT : Trustees Brett, Brown, Furcolo, 

McNamara, also, President Lederle, 
Provost Woods ide, Assistant Secretary 
Doolan, and Dean Spielman, Associate 
Dean Jeffrey, Associate Director 
Davis of the College of Agriculture 

Chairman Brett called upon Dean Spielman to present the 
report of the College of Agriculture to the committee. 

The presentation was given in four parts using charts and 
printed material as supplementary background information. 

I. Dean Spielman reported on his activities since July 1, 
1961. He gave as his objective during this period 
that of getting acquainted with the staffs within the 
various functions of the College of Agriculture - 
both at the University and at the. Experiment Stations 
at Waltham and East Wareham. 

The Dean has visited every department and has met 
almost every member personally. A tour of the state 
was made with Director Davis and every County Extension 
office was visited with the exception of Franklin County. 

Dean Spielman also has met with the majority of 
representatives of agricultural organizations in the 
state. 

The balance of the period was spent becoming 
familiar with state and University procedures which 
vary considerably from those in his previous locations. 

Dean Spielman concluded his preliminary remarks by 
stating that he has found many groups in the state look- 
ing to the College of Agriculture for more help. He 
finds that our state personnel system is far more com- 
plicated thanthose in the other states where he has been 
associated. Finally, he has found that very few people 
fully understand the scope of the College of Agriculture. 

II. Using the last point of his opening remarks, Dean 
Spielman gave a brief presentation on the organization 
of the College of Agriculture. He showed that the 



2309 



Report of 
College of 
Agriculture 



2310 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

teaching areas, which include the four-year agri- 
cultural courses, the graduate program, and the 
Stockbridge School, were but one of four basic 
functions. The others are Research, Extension and 
Public Service. He pointed out that this misunder- 
standing has led outsiders to determine the teacher/ 
student ratio of the College of Agriculture by using 
personnel from all four areas rather than the first 
area only. He added that the majority of the staff 
do function in more than one area and because they 
have academic titles, the assumption is made that 
they all be included in the teacher- student statistics. 

A general discussion period followed at this point. 
Further statements relative to the reliance of the 
people in the state upon the College of Agriculture 
were made and a brief discussion was held on appro- 
priate titles. It was suggested by the Chairman that 
thought be given to the use of the term "Research 
Center" rather than Experiment Station as it would 
be more meaningful to the public. Some discussion 
was given to the relationship between the College of 
Agriculture and the State Department of Agriculture. 

III. Associate Director Davis of the Extension Service pre- 
sented the scope of his function's activities in the 
areas of County Extension and 4-H programs. He stated 
that extension now covers a broad field ranging from 
agriculture through home economics and money manage- 
ment. Its services to youth should meet the needs 
of not only the rural boy or girl but all youths of 
the state. He pointed out that Extension Service is 
putting more emphasis on economic and social development 

He gave a progress report on the growth of the 
Regional Extension movement covering two or more present 
county activities. The Regional plan can offer a 
broader range of services and specialties than is 
possible with a single county extension office. 

Dr. Davis said that two major areas can still be 
improved - those of agricultural management and the 
marketing activities at the farmers' level. He felt 
that the areas of distribution and retailing have 
been developed quite satisfactorily to date. 

The area of frozen food handling has been promoted 
by the Extension Service and has received nationwide 
recognition. Dr. Davis told of the requests for his 
personnel at conferences and inquiries for more informa- 
tion regarding frozen food handling. At the present 
time, a film is being prepared to cover the program. 



I 



COMMITTEE 



2311 



1 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Dr. Davis concluded his remarks by stating that a 
greater effort must be put into the development of land 
and water usage. He said that the United States Depart- 
ment of Agriculture has put more funds and emphasis on 
rural areas development and that his Extension group 
has been organizing to meet the needs in this state. 

IV. Dean Jeffrey presented an academic summary for the 

College of Agriculture. There are now about 850 students 
in the three phases of the program, including the four- 
year students, graduate students, and the Stockbridge 
School. He showed charts of enrollments in these areas 
which indicated a steady growth during the last few 
years, after a slump during the mid-50' s. As an example 
of the distribution of the College of Agriculture 
graduates, he gave a summary of the Department of Animal 
Science 1961 graduates and where they went following 
graduation. Almost 80% of them entered some phase of 
the field for which they were trained. 

Dean Jeffrey gave a report on the regional New 
England cooperative plan using the Agricultural Engineer- 
ing program as an example. In this program, students 
attend the University for the first two years and com- 
plete the last two years at the University of Maine. 
On a reciprocal basis, the College of Agriculture re- 
ceives students from other states for the last two 
years of Forestry. 

During the discussion which followed the presenta- 
tion, Dean Jeffrey stated that the Stockbridge School 
accepts about three- fourths of those who apply for the 
two-year program and have reached a level of about 400 
students in the Stockbridge School. 

V. Dean Spielman then summarized the activities of the 

College of Agriculture and briefly covered the follow- 
ing additional points: 

A. There is an interchange of personnel and 
publications between states in special areas 
so that coordinated programs become possible. 
For example, there is research currently going 
on in about 45 regional projects. 

B. In research, the College of Agriculture covers 
all three of the basic phases of research. 
There is basic research, developmental research 
and the applied research covering four broad 
areas of production, processing, marketing 
and consumer areas. 

C. He has received specific requests for more 
assistance from the College of Agriculture in 
the fields of Forestry, Conservation and Natural 
Resources and the salt- fish industry. 



2312 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



D. The College of Agriculture is cooperating in 
the regional study of New England agricultural 
colleges conducted by the New England Board of 
Higher Education. He distributed copies of 
the questionnaire which has been completed by 
the College of Agriculture. However, the work 
of NEBHE has been slowed down through lack of 
a director to coordinate and study the data 
being submitted. 

E. A blueprint of the organization of the College 
of Agriculture and its future course of action 
should be completed by July 1, 1962 at which 
time more definitive goals can be presented. 

The meeting concluded with the Chairman and the committee 
commending Dean Spielman and his associates on the lucid and ex- 
cellent presentation to the group. 

The meeting was adjourned at 4:45 p.m. 




Robert/ J. Doolan 
Ass^scant Secretary 
Board of Trustees 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF COMMITTEE ON RECOGNIZED STUDENT ACTIVITIES 
October 13, 1961, 1:00 p.m., Student Union, Amherst 
Trustee Schuck presiding 



PRESENT : Trustees Schuck, Furcolo, Haigis, 

Pumphret, Thompson. Also, President 
Lederle, Provost Woods ide, Dean Field, 
Dean Curtis, Mr. Buck, Assistant 
Secretary Doolan. Also student repre- 
sentatives: Misses Linda Achenbach, 
Carol Veno, Patricia Chase, Susan 
Sidney, Janice Reimer, Lucy Dubiel 
and Messrs. Arthur Tacelli, Allen 
Berman, Bernard Murphy, Francis 
Lovejoy, James Trelease and Gordon 
Oakes 

The meeting opened with an informal luncheon which 
allowed the Trustees, the University staff and student representa- 
tives to meet and discuss mutual areas of interest. 

The group then moved to the Colonial Lounge. Trustee 
Schuck opened the meeting by stressing its informal approach and 
stated that the purpose was to have all groups represented become 
better acquainted. Miss Schuck introduced the members of the 
Trustee committee and gave some background information on each 
members. This was followed by the introduction of the University 



2313 



staff. 



Following this, the student representatives outlined to 



the committee, through informal discussion, some of the wide range 
of activities in which the University students participate. As the 
students represented, through their own activities, a broad spectrum 
of organizations, a most comprehensive summary was given. 

Through this informal approach, both Trustees and students 
had the opportunity of asking questions as pertinent points were 
raised. 



2314 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Concluding remarks indicated a vital interest by both the 
Trustee and student groups in promoting the welfare and activities 
of the University and mutually expressed their thanks for having 
the meeting. Both groups felt that more such meetings would have 
definite value. 

Attachment A to these minutes lists the student repre- 
sentatives attending the meeting and their respective backgrounds 
and activities. 

The meeting was adjourned at 3:30 p.m. 





. X 




Doolan 
Assistant Secretary 
Board of Trustees 



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JMMITTEE 



2315 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FINANCE 
October 19, 1961, 12:30 p.m., Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston 

Chairman Healey presiding 

PRESENT : Trustees Healey, Pumphret , Cashin, 
President Lederle and Treasurer 
Johnson; also, Mr. Herman Pike of 
Standish, Ayer & McKay, Inc. 

Treasurer Johnson reported that at the present time 
$700,000 is available for short-term investment from excess cash in 
the Trust and Agency Funds as indicated in Table III. This could 
be invested for periods from one to eight months as scheduled in 
the table. This is in addition to the $974,919.00 already in 
Savings Banks or U. S. Treasury Bills. 

Mr. Herman Pike, Investment Counsel, reported on his 
recommendations for short-term investment policy for these Trust 
and Agency Funds. He recommended that under present conditions it 
would be advisable to limit investments to Treasury bills, Federal 
Land Bank obligations or prime commercial paper as conditions in 
the market indicate. He cautioned against any large amount of this 
type of funds being invested in long-term bonds although he may 
wish to recommend some high-grade bonds at a later time. 

After thorough discussion of the investment policy, it 



was 



VOTED : That the Treasurer, with concurrence of 

Investment Counsel, Standish, Ayer & McKay, 
Inc. of Boston, may, from time to time, in- 
vest excess balances from Trust and Agency 
Funds, as indicated in Table II attached, 
such investments to be in U. S. Treasury 
bills, Federal Land Bank obligations, prime 
commercial paper, or prime finance company 
notes, and to report such investments when 
made to the Finance Committee of the 
Trustees. 



2316 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



The meeting was adjourned at 1:55 p.m. 




Kenneth/^ Johnson 
Treasurer 



» 



UNI VERS lit OF MASSACHUSETTS 



TRUST AM) AGENCY FUNDS 



Analysis fey Funds of Cash, Oct. 2, 1961 



TABLE I 



tpmtt nn aim > i T i whimwu im ■ 



^X^e c£ Fund 

Scholarship 



Student Loans 



Athlecscs 



Itei forte Deposits 
Boarding Hall* 



Student Health Service 



Student Union Fundus 



1 



University Store 
Reserve Account 
General Fund 
Food Service 

R* S. 0,: 



Research Grants s 



Industrial Funds 
Federal Funds 



All Other Trust Funds 



Agency Funds 



200 



63 
68 



No, of 
Individual 

Accounts 

30 
13 

2 

1 

1 

1 



204 



131 



47 



12 



$258,604,14 

55,103,24 
142, 456 .71 

39,268.90 
129 ,,01.4. 26 



165,804.6! 

196,142,9? 



» K1 » ' > H WW P WMJ «»— B*l*t mi» « *im t MH um . W lnlOfiWWW i 'VWfWif 



Amounts 



$ 41,374,20 
32,638.8? 
83,711.50 
71,150,22 



680,620.3 
96,676.7 



:"! *J 



624,44?, 25 



361,947.63 
164,088.81 
168,796.40 



Total 



442 



$2,325,472.00 



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!! 



COMMITTEE 



1 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON 
FACULTY AND PROGRAM OF STUDY 

November 10, 1961, 1:00 p.m., Student Union, Amherst 



2317 



Chairman Haigis presiding 



PRESENT : Trustees Haigis, Crowley, Furcolo. 

Schuck and President Lederle. Also, 
Provost Woods ide, Assistant Secretary 
Doolan, Registrar Lanphear, and Deans 
Jeffrey, Kirshen, Mars ton, McGuirk, 
Purvis and Wagner 

Chairman Haigis called upon Registrar Lanphear to 
discuss his report on transfer students within the University. 

Following a review of the figures in the report, 
Mr. Lanphear summarized his findings by stating that the number 
of transfers was not abnormal in a program of this size. He 
stated that much of it was due to a normal adjustment of student 
needs and interest. 

A general discussion followed in which the Deans pre- 
sented additional views and information relative to the figures 
given in the report. The committee pointed out that Mr. Lanphear 's 
report to the full Board of Trustees on October 21st gave the data 
on academic failure and this report showed the transfer data. 
However, there appeared to be a third area, that of drop-outs for 
other reasons, that was not picked up at this time. 

Mr. Lanphear stated that such data for the University 
are included in his annual report and could be broken out for the 
committee. He read off the drop-out information for the Class of 
1961 giving details of reasons for drop-outs. 

Dean Mars ton presented similar data for the School of 
Engineering which provided individual school statistics for the 
same class. 



Student 

Transfer 

Study 



2318 



COMMITTEE 



Special 
Examinat ions 



Unde rg r adua t e 
Courses 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



The committee asked Mr. Lanphear if he could summarize 
the total University picture and include a summary of Dean Marston's 
study to show data for an individual school. 

Mr. Lanphear and the Deans were thanked by the committee 
for attending the meeting and providing the information. 

The committee then discussed the proposal for establish- 
ing a credit -hour charge for special examinations. Mr. Lanphear 
stayed at the meeting to present background information on the pro- 
posal. The Provost outlined the requirements for the earning of 
credit through special examinations. The committee was in full 
agreement on the purpose of the examinations, but asked the Provost, 
for information purposes, to prepare a brief summary of the purpose 
and requirements for special examinations for distribution to the 
full Board. 

Upon recommendation of the Provost, and upon motion duly 

made and seconded, it was 

VOTED ; To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
a charge of five dollars ($5.00) per credit 
be established for special examinations. 
Such charge will be payable before final 
arrangements are made with the instructor 
in charge of the course. 

Provost Woodside presented the additions, changes, and 
deletions to the undergraduate programs of study as outlined in 
Attachment A to the meeting agenda. 

Upon recommendation of the Provost, and upon motion duly 

made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees the 

approval of the additions, changes, and de- 
letions to the undergraduate programs of 
study as outlined in Attachment A to these 
minutes and made a part of these minutes. 



COMMITTEE 



1 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



The committee discussed the proposed new courses in the 
graduate program as outlined in Attachment B to the meeting agenda 

Upon recommendation of the Provost, and upon motion duly 

made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees the 

approval of the graduate courses as outlined 
in Attachment B to these minutes and made a 
part of these minutes. 

The committee discussed the proposal for the Four-College 
Doctorate Program in Geology as submitted through Attachment C to 
the meeting agenda. The Provost reported that this would be the 
fourth doctoral area in the cooperative four-college effort. The 
other areas are in Biological Sciences, Chemistry, and French. 
The committee's reaction was very favorable and the Provost was 
commended for the very complete written presentation. 

Upon recommendation of the Provost, and upon motion duly 

made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees the 

approval of the Four-College Doctorate Pro- 
gram in Geology as outlined in Attachment 
C to these minutes and made a part of these 
minutes . 

The meeting was adjourned at 4:15 p.m. 




Robert a. Doolan 
Assistant Secretary 
Board of Trustees 



MWsfH, . 



2319 



New Graduate 
Courses 



Four-College 
Doctorate 
Program in 
Geology 



2320 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Attachment A 



i 



uhivbesot' car hassacbusots 

Undergraduate Course© 



lAttda 

Arch 25 



Land 

Arch 77. 78 



i 



Wildlife 61 



Wildlife 62 



Wildlife 63 



Wildlife 64 



landscape AscbiteetuMi 25 CDs ©Mmes 

Special techniques and sya&ols for 1 
and pictorial el69atioa 8 and tide u&e of 
acid color in vsv&eus mediae 

Z 3»heur laboiratery periods 



9 

1 3 



Wildlife 97. 98 



^ 



plans 8 sections 
speetlve chaste 

Credit 3 



teh&tecture 77 (1), 78 <2X) 

legation and 
oivie and metropolitan 
to non»isaJor& 



decentralisations 
design s and regional 



Prerequisite Issndscape Arehiteafcure 73 « 74 9 of permission 

Cvedit 3 



of the instructor* 
3 class hours 



Wildlife Itaigemeat 61 CDs HOMCIVUB OF VSUUIg HMMflBOBIV 

F&ndameatal ecology and principles of wildlife ssamageme&fc 
with eqpliesis en population- characteristics mid responses* 
Z class hours 5 1 4>"hour laboratory pario«l Credit 3 

Wildlife Management 62 (H>. 31GHttSW« <F WXUKffE MMttOOnX 

ICetheds of collecting and interpreting data in wildlife 
management wi$i esr$>tiasis en field and laboratory experience 
in census methods and criteria for determining $m 9 age 
mti ether characteristics of wild birds and mammals* 
Z class neurs £ I 4«hour laboratory period Credit 3 

Wildlife Management 63 {l)> mmmMi mmmMW WIL1SOTE C196&»63> 
Life histories e identification and habitat requirements of 
waterfowl and marshland furbaaring animals; management of 
wetland habitats. Siven in alternate years* 
2 class hours » I 4*hour laboratory period Credit 3 

Wildlife Management 64 01} MaHaSEMENSt Of WIMm WXLSL1FS <1%1~62) 
Life histories » identification and habitat requirements of 
upland gam© birds « gam® masaaals and furhearerss maaageisent 

of upland 'habitats* Siven in alternate years* 

2 ©lass hours 9 I 4*hour laboratory period Credit 3 

Hiltf-lfe Hanasemsnt 97 i%) & 98 (n> 9 OT6IAL fBGBLEHS 

Qualified seniors who have collated most of the wildlife 

courses may arrange for work on a special problem in a 

selected phase of wildlife management* 

Credit £«4* Total Gto&i&s for two semesters m&y not exceed 6, 



*. 



Botany 84 



Chemistry 3 & 4 



Eeenefai£3 75 



Seeacoiee 81- 



WBemmtea 83 



Math 75 



mth ?6 



Botany 84 & W^W^W^M 

Plant batarlor to relation to t&e physical and biological 
envifonBMiifcf; witftt «sapfeas£s en tk% oology of individual 

plants* 

Prerequisites? Botsay 67 and SI, 

2 3«!iour laboratery*diseussten periods ;:edifc 

Chemistry 3 CX)e * CH), OTEiUUL ZHOKUHXC CRBaSTSY 

A study of the fuadssiaatal dMHieal lews *md uUs©ri&s c , end 
including the elements ®€ qualitative analysis* 1 :;ud«ats 
planning to aajcr la ehemistry and oftes for « 
is a departmental rsquirs&sata 

2 ©lass hmm s Z 3»feoiiK laboratory periods Gre^ i 

Beene&dies 75 wmmmm, msmm w iraMtcs 

The applications of various trnthmmtimt eoneapts and 

teehniqyes in s^re*»seosM3t»ig! amd «&ero**eeaneiai& analyst 

Spesial OTptois is planed an the design @xid interpretation 

of m&hm&ti&M rosdels of eoenasto phmmmm* 

grerequisites: Eeoneuies 25 8 26| ttetibanties 1 Q 2 or 

os? e&nsenfs of the instructor. 

S class hours Credit 3 

Stonaoies 8l 8 OT0tM ECOHOMXC 'SVBUHT&QH 

Evolution of acenofiiie organization in agriculture;, industry 
and eoaaeree; tfee gunroundteg social and institutional life* 

Frerequisites: l£©m©©i©0 25 , History 5 and 6 3 of consent ®& 
the instructor. 

3 class hours 

bmmImi So 3 bzmubzal asfbc*s OF immmmn 

The uppiifmtion of etodera £lo&'»a£"£unds analysis to the 
financial MhaviMflr of the various i*a£eo£'& of £he econongr, 
Speeial oqpfoaais Is planed on the financial asp«£te of business 
units and the business sagtor* 

Frerequisitess Eeoneeiios £3 and ^counting ?5~ or eensent 
of the lnstrttotor« 

3 glass sours Credit 3 

Matnastaties 75 m» m*$mm mmxsmm imwmE 

Series solution of differential aquatioi&s» functions of several 
variables g, partial differential equations d nmaerical analyse 

and the Isaplece fcrans£em> »et available for B&Jcrs 

ftere^uisite? mthmmM® 32. or §2* 

3 class hours 3 

Hathemf ic® 76 (11) aWiUCEB EHSBORBXIIB IMSBEWanCS 

¥eators and vaster spaces & vector field theory s eoa^le^ 
analysis « Wq& available: for majors t^> Matnesiaties* 
Prerequisites «atfe®iastios 32. or 92« 
3 elass heu*? 



3. 



Psyeh 51 



Psyeh 53 



Russian Si* 52 



psychology 5 (i)* mmm* pssgrouxs* i 

Introduction to b&sie eoaoepts and taethods o£ psyehologyo 

Copies include neural mechanisms £ , sensation* perception, 
emotion and mti , mticn learning and thinking.* -acid problem 

Solv'jftg, 

2 f-.iase hours $ 1 2»hour laboratory period Credit 3 

Psy^htlogy 6 CTOs €«BRAL P8CBHCX106K XI 

A c anfcinu&fciea of Psychology 5* monies lnelude intelligence, 
faujsn di^elc^fssatg attitudes , eoafllet, personality;, group 
processes sad personality change* 
2 class hours 9 I 2*hour laboratory period €ffodife 3 



Fetology 51 CX) 3 S2$Sra®ti AH9 PSSgBHrlfiir 

A study of Hie data., theories and methods ef studying 

sensation and perception. 

Prerequisite; Psychology 6« 

% class hours » 1 2«hour laboratory period Credit 3 

Psychology 53 COt MWlWttiai 

the data r , theories and the methods of. investigating activation* 

topics include ptimsy drives $ emotions & frustration and 

eea£llet 9 sad learned d%iv®s« 

Prerequisite: Psychology 6 

2 class hours I. 2«heur laboratery period Credit 3 

Iftissien 51 (S), 52 (11), IHTBOD^TIC^ It) RSSSXAN ktOTOTRI 
A survey course 'la Russian prose for Russian majors and as 
aa introduction to Russian literature for ether students* 

Readings in Esglishj, but Russian majors will be rehired 

to do some reading in Russian* Hither semester may be ^l^sted 



Credit 3 



Prerequisite: junior standing 
3 class hours 



Russian 53* 54 



Russian 53 <X), 54 C£X) 3 D0S80WSK £M® TOrSOT IN fEEIB 

EUROPEAN SgmN@ 
Each semester the ineortaat vorks of one author will bo 



prerequisite: Proficiency in Russian 

3 ©lass hours 



Russian 56 



to 



56 <xi) fe isssiMi mmk 

study o£ Russian Braam in die 
establishment of a Russian 

iM the plays of 
i Proficiency in 
3 class hours 



originals? from the beginnings 
repertoire &nd theatre 
, Chekhov and Gorky* 



Credit 3 



Russian 5? 



Russian 57 (X), SOTOf UTERiOTEB 

A representative study of the beginnings and development of 

Soviet prose, drama and criticism from Gorky to Shelekiev and 

Pasternak* 

Prerequisite; Prof ieieaey in Russian 

3 class hours Ctm 



4. 



Russian 18 



Russian 61. 62 



Russian 63 



Russian 64 



Russian 71 



Russian 98 



Chsra 
l£og 30 



Russian 53 (sx) e otssxam mmffiX 

A study of Russian poetey in ish© orLglaaXs* f&om ina early 
days of tsha 19£a ean&ui?y to the psesoRta with an aapbasie on tfea 
Major poafeio trandso 
prerequisite* Bflefieieney In Russian 

3 oiass tears Credit 3 

Russian 61 (X>* ft (n) t A0MHCBO IBIfltt 

Cbjaofcivess to build TOeobuli&ry and to is^gove reading 

ability th&augb selo^tions from f&e Classto! and Soviet 
Foriodsc Ctoqpositiens and «lass*m©m disoussions in Russian 

on the neteriel road as?® required* 

Prera«|uisitos tesian 6 

3 olass &eurs 8 I laboratory nour €;radifc 3 

Russian 63 (X), SCSBOIFXC R08SXA1I 

Intensive ©gporienea in translating soieatifie «aposition & 

aeadentio and journalistic pmm* 

Prerequisite* Russian 6 m the o«tuifala&£ 

3 class tars Crodic J 

Eusslan 64 {n)» SHB HISOTST OF 2HB BBS8XAH MIOT0E 

A d€ts©rl£Jtion of the historical development of the Russian 
languages its relation to other languages, ehange© in &aund s 
tons and vocabulary from the earliest period m the present* 
fterequlfiites: Russian 62 9 Junior or Senior steading' 

3 elass hours Credit 3 

Russian 71 (X) 8 RUSSIA GOHvTO&ttXOB 

Objectives* to develop fluency i& sneaking Russian and a 
eoaversatteal vocabulary appropriate for ecoial and business 

iatereoursea 

Prerequisites: Russian 62 a Junior or Senior standing 

3 eiass hours* 1 laboratory hour Credit 3 

Eussian 98 (XX) , P1DBMS XR RUSSIaBf UfflNWBR m® kXfm&SJSRS 
Intensive and independent *?ork on epeeial pre-blass in 
Russian language and literature,* with She results so bc- 
presentad in written form* Rehired of all majors* 

Prerequisites* Russian 62 and senior standing l**3 

€hemto'& &*gioees?ing 80. kxkrxxcs 

Principles underlying the rates at ?*hioh ehealeal t«s*' 

formtiens take plaee* Review of differential equations 

governing reaction velocity; of foot: of ten^erature and 

catalysis i application to design of industrial eheaii' 

reactors. 

Prerequisite:- Hitamis&ry 65 

2 eless hours Credit 2 



5. 

I A physical css^lenation of the mmbeMlml*. electrical e 

I magnetic and theraml properties of engineering asaterialso 
i Prerequisites: ghemistry 2 ot? 4 a faysies 5 and 6 eg 25 

and 26 8 or their equivalents « 

3 class hours Credit 3 

XoBo 72 Industrial KogJaeeriss 72 8 PRINCIPLES OF SN33MBRX136 STATXSflCS 

A study of statistical principles as applied t© engineering 

problems including j analysis ©£ wsiaitee* design of «Ks>«ri* 

?aants & sailing plans 9 statistical e$uality control* 

industrial problem solutions* 

Fraraqui&iftftt Statistics 77 

3 class hours Credit 3 

X,Eo 97$ 98 Industrial Engineering §7 <X) d 98 (IX)* XMWfZlXAIi MHDIBlIIIft 

PB&ISCSS 

Individual studies $ investigations or projects in Industrial 
Engineering of an appropriate scope and leva! of difficulty 
for students in the Honors program or a senior thesis* 

Credits 1-3 

B> Departnsnt ©£ Military and Air Science 

Air Sci 77 Air Science 77 <I) & PBINCIFUSS ABO WimmB OF mxrAB* 1&UJSB8BXF 

principles and techniques e€ leadership and oanag anient in 
J 1 the armed forces^ with sssphasls en the U.S* Air Force,. 

II Prerequisites t Mx Science 51 „ 5Z& and consent of Bapovtnanfe. 
I 1 class hour. 1 laboratory 'hour Credit % 

TU Delation of the following courses: 

wildlife Management 70 s puncsus m mimim nmemam 
wUdiife iiinagc«nt 71, mmsam* %wmm mb wmswam 
wium** i^nagement 72, mmm^msmi uunms 

Wildlife Management 74 3 ™3ISJX«|U1S HI mi&Ifl HASTAIMillf 
Wildlife ManegesBent 75,, FilRBEAtM ®Wtm£ Am nmmSBBfi 
Wildlife mmgmmt $6 9 $mmm 

mthwmtUB 72 s m&stm of MfHugmsis 

Psychology 27 e 0MHUa HHGaaUMRr 

Eussian ss s mmmmms of EssssAH tasmiam& w mimtinm. 

Mechanical Engineering 92 § m£OTtCA& S!63tlRSS8X.H6 MTl&U&S 

l 

| III. Hew SSajor - Russian 

) 

The Rusai&n Ifejor euvrieulem will require elenentary and inter- 
mediate language &mt®m (lussian I 9 2,4 e©d 5), low additional 
language study eos&rses <1teaiaa 61,62*71 and either 63 or 64) , live 
literature et&dy courses (tasian 51,52,53,54' and ens of 56,57, 
Si) and a seminar coarse (Eussian 9g)» 



6. 



GIOGMFOT 31, World Political Geography 

Aa-aaalysle of -tae physical aad hmm resource base from 
which state© mast operate ead an appreciation of their • 

political character in fehis light. 

3 class tasre Credit 3 

4, CsmricuJUsa for Laadscaps Architecture 
Hat!* ? ia place ©I Matb I, £« 

%r©aomy $£ repaired -last; ead of listed -as sa talter&ate. • 
Art 33 ia place of Agric&lture i« 
Taree sew courses (Landscape Architecture t%* 7? and 78* 

see I. A,, sb©f©«) 
Re^icioa of list oi elect Ives and rears element of se* 

qusece of courses. 

B» College of Arts & Scleaces* Basic aad Dis&slfeutios Requirements 
(The gellewia$ smenfitaeats refer to pages 63 aad 64 of the 
1960*61 uaiwrsity Bulletin oa U&dergrad^ate Schools*) 

I * Restate Basic Retirement 4 by: 

4. fsjo or' the golta?ia$j (a) a year ia one physical 
science s (b) a year of biological science which 
may fee ia ©330 or la two biological seieace depart- 
ments, (c) a year of mathematics or a semester of 

mathematics' ©ad a semester c€ logics students *&o 
major la aaEeral ae lease or mathematics must com- 
plat© all three. 

2. Replace Basic Retmiremamfc 5 byi 

5a, Candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Arts must 

complete History 5 aad 6„ 

5b. Xae Baeaetor of Sclaaee degree may be earned oaly 
by student:© majeriag ia Mathematics , Psychology , 
©r a natural Seieace tfto complete afc least 60 credits 
ia courses ia Mathematics, Fsycaology aad natural 
Science* 

3. &evisa t!s& Bistributiea Requirement to readj 



Zkj 



Pistributien Requirement - sis credit© earned ia courses 
of at least tm credits ia beta of tic divisioas ia ehiea 

the ©tudeat 10 act major lag, 

Xa the aumaaitica division, most courses may be offered 
to meet this re^uiremeati the exceptions* are (a) 
specialised ' eeerses deemed to aaro a strong pre-pro- 
feseisaal es^hasio aad <b) courses Y&ieh xoight be offered 
to meet a basis retirement* feat History 5 aad 6 may be 
offered by candidate© for the Bacbelor of Seieace degree. 



7. 



In tht. social science division! all courses except 

Economies It and 25, Government 25, Psychology 26 &nd 27, 
and Sociology 25 w$y-b<*. offered fco fseet this requirement » 

In the division of natural science and mathematics, the- • 
courses offered to raeet the eesfcined basis sad distribu- 
tion requirement tm$t include i (a) a year in one physical. 
science , (b) a yeas' of bio log. ieel science and (c) a third 
year which J$ay be <1) a year of mathematics, (2) a semester 
of m&thesaatics end a semester of logic or (3) two courses 
in natural seienee except Chemistry 80* Geography 35 , SO, 
55, and 81, Public Health 61 , 62, 83, and 84, and Zoology 
51, (Entomology 28 may be chosen)* 

*Th© official list of these courses is on file in the 
office of the Bean. 

Th© course© to he so listed, in addition to those for fewer 
titan Z credits, are; 

English j 50, SI, 52, 53, 54 
French? 80 

Journal lata* 81, 82 s 91, 92 
I&isiC! 81, 82, $3* 85, a?, 89, 90 

Speech: Si, 81, 82 ? 63, 64, 65, 88, 71, 75, 78, 82, 83, 
84, 85. 

The courses t&lch sight be offered to seat a basic require- 
ment are nr®"prof icieaey level courses is foreign language 
and the logic csarses, Philosophy 31 and 75. 

4. Baplaee the first line of the major rasjatomsat by: 

"Each student must complete the requirements of one of 
the major pzo&tvm described undo? Junior-Senior Curricula! 
these progrems include at least twenty ȣ our (24) semester. so" 
and leave the remainder unchanged. 

C» Basic Surging Program 

Humanities requirement reduced from four to three courses. 
Reduce credit requirement in the gjajor from S3 to 77 
credits, end die total credit requirement for progrsm from 
158 to 150* Eevise clinical practice requirements in major. 
Offer a 3 credit seminar in both semesters of senior year 
to integrate offerings of Cursing 85 and 98* 

The revisad progr&m also will include a course in Human 
Grofcrta end Development. The specifics of this course have 
not been established* It will be submitted for the Provost's 
approval at a later date* 



B. Ctaoicai Sagisaftriftyg 3hros*a» 

CSusniatry-S, 4 to ceoleca Ctaaistry &$. 

Civil Sagiaoeriag 52 to realae* Civil Esgiaoerisas 53 * 

Electrical Sagitte©ris$ 62, ChestieaX Eftglseeriitg 96 and 

Ckemietry §5 dropped f rom program* 
Beorraagat&iifc of eaqneaea oi eoiars&s. 

IV* ISifeli the Coamieffee'a ogrecaaeiit* the Freveafc approved the follow* 

isog revisions In Industrial Easineeri*$-&wriettXtti» in orfe to .. 
provide for a B.8» degree i& Industrial Ei^ii2&£?i$$« At present, 

fcfee degree in Sfeeltaaie&X EKS$neerieg at^sd«s4 to- Industrial Engineer- 
ing majors dees not properly recognise th&ir specialised training, 
the dasage does not involve a separate depasfcoeafc Id the field, 

Xhe t»ew c^rrieulum will involve t&e £®llmin$ $hm$m : 

SSfo longer revised o£ mjors: 

tfsebaaieal Sngiaenriog #4, 3mfiN0iftfMI!X&S XX 

mtacssatic© $?, tmrn. mammm am qm$&& sheqry 
Mseha&ieai Engineering $** msmmmM* MCMMC&L mmm&mm 

Industrial Eagteering 75, JOB m&himim 

Added to regsi&eiseat for wh$qx&*. 

Xndasfcri&X Eagtnteriag 56, &a3& ittGCSSgXSB 

Industrial Eagiaoortt^ 72* mMCXH&g OF gNBZN&S&IKG STATISTICS 
(net? eearae, see I.e. * above) 

Envision of the sequence el &m& o£ the conraes. 



Mais 

'Course 



taqpite* Scions 21. (X) (XX) 

As* introduction to toe $>re0raisBaing of digital 
Tories inolt&ded are feasie pro$y£3«ing ayateiaa* esw_ 

and tea logie of progreisisiisg and compilation* l»re- 
Mata I and eifcta 2 or 4. I class ttoura 



:;ers • 
languages , 



Credit X< 



Course 
Change 



Seereatlon t^aderskl£> 79 &&$ 80-, ^rectics* Lendevanlp, Credit 6. 
Caanged to Saeroatioit LeadeKsfein ©5, Credit 6, 



9. 



Engine ering Science Options 

to establish optional curricula io engineering science in all depart- 
ments 00 the School oi s Snginearisag effective September I., 19-61 for the Class of 
1903 and those following, Many engineering schools , ■recognlalas the closer ties 
developing between engineering and the sciences - especi&lly. physics, chesuistry 
and ai&theiaatics * and the increased interest in graduate work both in the engineer- 
ing sciences and the traditional engineering fields, have established engineering 
science undergraduate curricula* This approach sashes such a curriculum available 
to students butt within the already established departments « . The degree *?iil be a 
B.$. in these departssente , i.e., B.S. in%.S. and the t&aasc?£g»t will indicate 
"fcgajorj M.IMBagr.Sc.)". 

l&e general reiguireaeats ore as follows: 

l« Interest in the Engineering Sciences (mechanics of solids, eechanica 
of fluids, thermodynamics* electrical sciences, nature and properties of materials, 

transfer and rate processes). 

2. GGfltpietien of the frestasan and sonhesore years vtith a 2.8 average or 
above, or the sophmaere year «ith a 3.21 average or above. 

3. Probable interest in graduate study. 

The curricula, planned and administered by an Engineering Science Curriculum 
CosBittGe within the School, will include the following; 

a. First two years of aorsai engineering major* 

b. A core required of all consisting of: 

Ch.S, 25 Fundamentals 1LE. 63 Engineering $hanRodyasst£cc I 

C.E. 34 Statics 21. E. 87 Engineering Thermodynamics 111 

C.I* 52 Bynaj&ice tfath. 7S &dvaaeed Calculus for Engineers 1 

C.K. 7S Fluid ISeehaaics Math. 76 Advanced Caieulus for Engineers II 

E.S. 41- Circuit t ? ieid Analysis X tt«B. 83 nature and Properties of Materials 

B*£« 42 Circuit field Analysis XI JBsa&v, Science Sasstar <i for. each sessesfcer) 

dost students will have bad seise of these courses within (a) above. 

c. The reminder of the student *6 program Mil be chosen by the student in 
consultation with his advisor but raast meet ail University, School of 
Engineering end &ajer da^arts&ufc basic requirements, Xt is expected 
that there trill be <a) sansk tsese freedom of choice thm in the normal 
engineering curriculum sm4 (b) laors selection of courses outside of the 
taajor departsfeite and outside of engineering. 



p- 



3 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 
MEMORANDUM 

From . . , .Graduate Qf£ige Date .... Qcto^er 3.8,. l?^ 

To ... • .^..Eobert Doolan, Assistant Secretary ...♦,...,, 



The Graduate Council recommends to the President and Trustees the approval 
of a Four-College Ph.D. program in Geology. Copies of the proposal as approved 
by the Graduate Council are enclosed. 

The Graduate Council has voted approval of the following new courses, 
subject to approval by the University of Massachusetts Board of Trustees: 

BOTANY 

Botany 210, ADVANCED PHYCOLOGY. -Detailed study of marine and freshwater 

algae with emphasis on phylogeny, life histories and ecology. Credit, 3. 

Prerequisite, Botany l6l or equivalent. Mr. Wilce. 

Botany 212, ADVANCED PLANT TAXONOMY. -Lectures and discussion of methods 
utilized in plant taxonomy with examples drawn from cytological, genetical, 
morphological, serological, and chromatographic studies of higher plants. 
Prerequisite, Botany 159. Credit, 3. 

Mr. Davis. 

Botany 21k. FOSSIL TRACHEOPHYTES. -Detailed study of anatomy and repro- 
ductive histology of those fossil forms which best represent the phylogeny 
of vascular plants. Credit, 3« 

Mr. Putala. 
EDUCATION 

Education 232, HISTORY OF AMERICAN EDUCATION. -The development of American 
education in the context of American intellectual thought. Credit, 3. 

Mr. Cohen. 
GEOLOGY 

Geology 202, ADVANCED MINERALOGY. -Physical and chemical characteristics 
of minerals and methods of laboratory investigation, including X-ray, 
differential thermal analysis, and microchemical techniques. Credit, 3. 
Prerequisite, Geology 201 and permission of instructor. The Staff. 

Geology 225- CENOZOIC STRATIGRAPHY. -Occurrence, correlation, and origin 
of marine and terrestrial Cenozoic deposits, and their relation to paleo- 
geographic and tectonic conditions; emphasis is on North America. 
Prerequisites, Geology 178 and 189. Credit, 3. 

Mr. Webb. 

Geology 227. MARINE GEOLOGY. -Physical characteristics and geological 
processes of the ocean basins and margins, and their bearing on inter- 
pretation of geologic history. Credit, 3. 
Prerequisites, Geology 178 and 19h* Mr. Webb. 

Geology 232. PHYSIOGRAPHY OF NORTH AMERICA. -A survey of the physiographic 
provinces of North America and their evolution, with emphasis on problems 
and methods of approach. Credit, 3. 

Prerequisite, Geology 16*9. Mr. Motts. 



- 2 - 

Geology 2U5- EVOLUTION OF GEOLOGIC CONCEPTS. -Perspective on current 
geological thinking in the light of its historical background; particular 
attention to controversial questions and to the rise and decline of ruling 
theories (required of all doctoral candidates), Credit, 3. 

Prerequisite, one year of graduate study. Mr. Motts, 

Geology JjOO, THESIS, PH.D. DEGREE. Credit, 30. 

PSYCHOLOGY 

Psychology 211 j SENSORY PROCESSES I, Auditory and cutaneous senses; the 
fundamental data with their implications concerning functioning of these 
systems. 

Prerequisites, Psychology 15>1 or six credits of advanced Psychology and 
three hours of Zoology or the equivalent. Credit, 3. 

Mr. Dzendolet. 

Psychology 212,, SENSORY PROCESSES II .-Visual, gustatory and olfactory 
senses; the fundamental data with their implications concerning functioning 
of these system?. 

Prerequisites, Psychology l£l or Psycho'lcgy 20?^ or six credits of advanced 
Psychology and three hours of Zoology or the equivalent. Credit, 3. 

Mr. Dzendolet. 

SOCIOLOGY 

Sociology 29?*-RESEARCH METHODS .-Research design, research models, 
scaling techniques , electronic data processing techniques. 
Prerequisites, Sociology 195* 196, and permission of instructor. 

Credit, 3. 
Mr. Lovald. 



Gilbert L. Woodside, Provost 
Acting Dean, Graduate School 



c 



proposal 12 2: h 

FOUR-COLLEGE DOCTORATE PROGRAM 

"*"•*"" """ — — — — ■ T -— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — 

IN GEOLOGY 



GENERAL STATEMENT : Ths Connecticut Valley area of Massachusetts has 
been a center of geologic study since the early days of the 
science. It was a professor at Amherst College, Edward 
Hitchcock ? who, in the 1830' s, made the first geological 
survey of the entire state, the first survey of any entire 
state, in fact, made at the public expense. Hitchcock also 
carried out the original geological surveys of most New 
England states, the centenary of his ?i Geology of Vermont" 
is celebrated this autumn. Since that time, a strong 
tradition in geology developed further at Amherst College, 
and spread to the neighboring colleges. 

B. K. Emerson much later summarized ,f The Geology of Massa- 
chusetts and Rhode Island 1 ; he was vice president of the 
International Geological Congress at St. Petersburg (Russia); 
at home he started geology as a subject at the rising young 
institutions that became Smith College and the University 
of Massachusetts. Both Emerson and his successor, Loomis, 
were members of the National Academy of Science. F. B. 
Loomis was an outstanding student of vertebrate paleontology 
and carried an international reputation. 

At each of the three colleges, specialized collections 
suited to their respective interests grew through the years, 
and their geological libraries gained strength in different 
specialized fields. At the university, a period of vigor- 
ous growth in geology started in 1946, necessarily follow- 
ing a somewhat different course than that in the other 
colleges, emphasizing fields less dependent on extensive 
collections. This growth was given particular impetus with 
the department's move into the new Morrill Science Center 
in 1960, making available greatly increased laboratory space 
and much modernized and augmented equipment of all types, 
and with the promise of still further expansion and improve- 
ment as two additions to Morrill are completed. 

As an outgrowth of these separate lines of development, the 
four geology departments of the valley complement one 
another in virtually unique ways, and their collective 
scientific resources compare favorably with those of many 
large and well-known universities, and in some respects 
surpass those of leading universities. The suitability of 
these resources for graduate study was recognized by the 
individual departments in the past, and programs leading to 
the Master's degree have been in effect either continuously 
or discontinuously at each of the four colleges. No formal 
effort to pool their resources has been made previously, 
however, although informal cooperation is well established. 



The recent expansion of the university department, how- 
ever, now places it in a position to contribute much more 
effectively to a cooperative undertaking, and the time 
thus seems ripe for a doctorate program to be initiated 
on that basis. 

At the same time, growing needs for more advanced train- 
ing for a larger number of people provide an added incen- 
tive for developing a doctorate program here. As the 
technological base of our society expands and grows more 
complicated, many jobs in government and in industry which 
once could be filled by those having the bachelor's or 
master's degree are coming to require doctorate training. 
The great expansion in college and university enrollments 
leads to a further demand for training of more people at 
the doctorate level. To meet these growing needs, the 
four colleges have special collective qualifications. 

In the following pages, the educational and research re- 
sources of each of the four departments are outlined at 
some length, with mention of those which have unusual as- 
pects. This is followed by a statement concerning fields 
of specialization, departmental requirements, new courses 
desired, and other matters relating to successful activa- 
tion of a doctorate program. 



RESOURCES AT AMHERST COLLEGE : 

DEPARTMENTAL FACILITIES: 

Laboratories for the basic branches of geology, for exper- 
imental work and other research activities, and for 
preparation of thin sections (a highly skilled tech- 
nician is on duty for the latter), 

Geological museum which probably is the largest and best 
equipped for any liberal-arts college in the country. 

Laboratory equipment includes standard items and the fol- 
lowing more specialized items: 

Mineral-separation equipment by magnetic, electro- 
static, ultrasonic, panning, and heavy-liquid 
methods 

Spectrophotometer 

X-ray machine with electronic recorder 

Diamond saws up to 30 in, diameter 

Sedimentation tank 20 x 50 ft. 

Equipment for model experiments 

Collections : 

Paleontological : 

Extensive collection of invertebrate fossils. 
Collection of dinosaur footprints which is now 

the largest one accessible in the world 
Vertebrate fossils from North America and 

Patagonia; several thousand specimens in- 
cluding much type and locality material 
frequently consulted by specialists from 
other universities and musuems. Contains 
fish, amphibian, reptile, and mammal mater- 
ial. 
Mineralogical: excellent systematic collection in- 
cluding more than 1000 species, with type mater- 
ial from some localities. 
Ores: outstanding collection of rock and ore-mineral 
suites from mining localities throughout the 
world, including many specimens of unusual size, 
up to 3 square feet. 
Large structural specimens of marble and other rocks 
Maps: 

Topographic: U. S. Geological Survey and Army 

Map Service collections. 
Geologic: regional and national maps for North 
America and other continents. 

Library: excellent departmental library, with particular 
emphasis on U. S. and Canadian periodicals, and German 
works on mineralogy, paleontology, and economic geol- 
ogy. 



4 



DEPARTMENTAL FACULTY: 

George W. Bain, Samuel A. Hitchcock Professor 
Training and degrees: 

B. Sc, McGill University, 1921 
A. M., Columbia, 1923 
Ph. D., Columbia, 1927 
Hon. A. M., Amherst, 1941 
Professional experience: 

Staff member, Canadian Geol. Surv., 1921-24 

Asst. Prof., Vermont, 1925-26 

Instr, to Prof., Amherst College, 1926 to date 

Director, Pratt Museum, 1948 to date 

Field geologist, Mclntyre Porcupine Gold Mines, 

1926 
Consulting geologist, Vermont Marble Co., 

1927-39 
Chief geologist, Manhattan Eng. Dist., U. S. 

War Dept., 1944-46 (received Citation for 

Exceptional Civilian Service) 
Consulting geologist, Phelps Dodge Corp., 

1947-48. 
Member Baruch Comm., Atomic Energy Comm., 1946 
Membership in professional organizations: 
Inst. Min. £• Met. Eng. 
Geol. Soc. Amer. 
Society Economic Geo3 . 
Mineralogical Soc. 
Canadian Inst. Min. & Metal. 
Subjects taught: 

General geology 
Regional geology 
Mineral deposits 
World resources 
Research interests and activities: 
Structural geology 
Mineral deposits 

Gerald P. Brophy, Assoc. Professor 
Training: 

A. B., Columbia, 1951 
M. A., Columbia, 1953 
Ph. D,, Columbia, 1954 
Professional Experience! 

N.Y. ass f t. state geologist, summers 1948-50 
AEC contract geologist, 1951-54 
AEC consulting geologist, summer 1954 
Consulting geologist, N.Y. state, summer 1955 
Consulting geologist, Kennecott Copper, summer 

1956 
Consulting geologist, R. I. Venderbilt, 9/1955 
Consulting geologist, Kennecott Copper, 1956-57 
Research Fellow, Univ. of Illinois, 1958 
Visiting Asst. Research Prof., Penn State, 

summer 1959 



Consulting geologist, Kennecott Copper, summer 
1960 
Membership in professional and honorary societies: 

Mineralogical Soc. Amer. 

Geological Soc. Amer. 

Sigma Xi 
Subjects taught: 

General geology 

Mineralogy 

Petrology 
Research interests: 

X-ray crystallography 

Economic geology 

Anthony Reso, Asst. Professor 
Training: 

A. B., Columbia, 1954 
M. A., Columbia, 1955 

Ph. D., Rice Institute, 1960 
Professional experience: 

Fellow in Physics & Instructor in Geology, 
Queens College, 1954 (spring semester) 

Asst. in geology, Columbia Univ., 1954-55 

Geologist, Atlantic Refining Co., 1955-56 

Asst. in geology, Univ. of Cincinnati, 1956-57 

Graduate asst. & fellow, Rice Institute, 
1957-59 

NSF Fellow in geology, 1959 

Asst. Professor, Amherst College, 1959 to date 

Geological research consultant, Tenn. Gas & 
Oil Co., 1960 
Membership in professional and honorary societies: 

Sigma Xi 

Sigma Gamma Epsilon 

Geol. Soc. Amer. 

Houston Geol. Soc. 

Amer. Assoc. Petrol. Geol. 

Paleontological Society 

Soc. Economic Paleo. and Min. 

Amer. Assoc. Adv. Sci. 

Paleo. Research Institution 
Subjects taught: 

Historical geology 

Sedimentation and stratigraphy 

Invertebrate paleontology 
Research interests and activities: 

Stratigraphy of the central Cordilleran geo- 
syncline 

Albert E. Wood, Professor (Biology) 
Training: 

B, S., Princeton, 1930 
M. A., Columbia, 1932 

Ph. D., Columbia, 1935 (geology) 






Professional experience: 

Cutting traveling fellow in Europe, Canada, 
and U. S., 1934-35 

Asst. geologist, U. S. Army Engineers, 1936-39 

Assoc, geologist, U. S. Army Engineers, 1939-41 

Geologist, U. S. Army Engineers, 1941, 1946 

Asst. Prof, to Prof, (biology), Amherst, 1946 
to date 

Assoc, curator, vert. Paleo., Pratt Museum, 
1948 to date 

Member to director of paleontological expedi- 
tions 
Membership in professional organizations: 

Amer. Assoc. Adv. Sci, 

Soc. Mammal. 

Paleont. Soc. 

Geol. Soc. Amer. 

Soc. Zool. 

Soc. Vert. Paleo. (currently President) 

Soc. Study Evolution 
Subjects taught: 

Vertebrate paleontology 
Research interests: 

Rodent paleontology and evolution 

FACULTY PUBLICATIONS AND REPORTS: 
George W. Bain: 

Magnesite deposits of Grenville, Quebec: Am. Inst. 

Min. and Met. Eng. Trans., vol. 69, 1923, 

p. 60-78; abstract, Mining and Metallurgy, vol. 

4, 1923, p. 257. 
Almandite and its significance in the contact zones 

of the Grenville limestone: Jour, Geology, 

vol. 31 f 1923, p. 650-668. 
Alluvial fan deposits in the Upper Huronian: Am. 

Jour. Sci., vol. 8, 1924, p. 54-60. 
Types of magnesite deposits and their origin: Econ. 

Geology, vol. 19, 1924, p. 412-433. 
Amount of assimilation by che Sudbury norite sheet: 

Jour. Geology, vol. 33, 1925, p. 509-525. 
Pre-Keewatin sediments of the upper Harricana Basin, 

Quebec: Jour. Geology, vol. 33, 1925, p. 728- 

743. 
Skeleton quartz crystals: Am. Mineralogist, vol. 10, 

1925, p. 435-441. 
Barraute area, Abitibi County, Quebec: Canada. Geol. 

Survey, Summ. Rept., 1926, p. 126. 
Diffusion in Agate Point vitrophyres: Am. Jour. Sci., 

vol. 11, 1926, p. 74-88. 
Resorption as an agent in freeing hematite from the 

Grenville granite magma: Canadian Inst. Min. 

and Met., Bull. 167, 1926, p. 379-392. 



Agate Point rocks: Am. Jour. Sci., vol. 11, 1926, 
p. 364. 

Evidence of assimilation and assimilation process- 
es: Jour. Geology, vol. 34, 1926, p. 657-670. 

Tectonics of original Huronian of Webbwood, Ontario: 
Pan-Am. Geologist, vol. 44, 1925, p. 95-120. 

Source of original Huronian sediments: Pan-Am. 
Geologist, vol. 44, 1925, p. 187-198. 

Is the Huronic Gowganda conglomerate of glacial ori- 
gin?: Pan-Am. Geologist, vol. 44, 1925, p. 369- 
386. 

Killarneyan intrusives of Sudbury: Pan-Am. Geolo- 
gist, vol. 45, 1926, p. 109-124. 

Chemistry of Killarneyan magma of Sudbury: Pan-Am. 
Geologist, vol. 45, 1926, p. 277-294. 

Physiographic development of Canadian shield: Pan- 
Am. Geologist, vol. 46, 1926, p. 53-62 and 
p. 363-374. 

Physiographic development of Canadian shield: Pan- 
Am. Geologist, vol. 47, 1927, p. 15-28. 

Geology and problems of Webbwood area, Canada, 
Thesis, Columbia University: Contributions 
from the department of geology of Columbia 
University, vol. 36, 1927. 

The geology and mineral deposits of the Harricanaw 
and Bell river basins: Canadian Min. and Met. 
Bull., no. 178, 1927, p. 201-247; discussion, 
no. 181, 1927, p. 594-603. 

Huronian stromatoporoid-like masses: Pan-Am. Geol- 
ogist, vol. 47, 1927, p. 281-284. 

Geologic history of the Green Mountain front: 

Vermont, State Geologist, 15th Rept., 1927, 
p. 222-241. 

Contact metamorphism and related changes in composi- 
tion: Vermont, State Geologist, 15th Rept., 
1927, p. 242-263. 

The graphite deposits of Louisa, Quebec: Econ. 
Geology, vol. 24, 1929, p. 733-752. 

Structure of gold-bearing quartz in northern Ontario 
and Quebec: Am. Inst. Min. and Met. Eng., Tech. 
Pub. 327, 1930, 44 pp. 

Spontaneous rock expansion: Jour. Geology, vol. 39, 
1931, p. 715-735; abstract, Geol. Soc. America, 
Bull., vol. 42, 1931, p. 236-237. 

Flowage folding: Am. Jour, Sci., vol. 22, 1931, 

p. 503-530; abstract, Geol. Soc. America, Bull., 
vol. 42, 1931, p. 229; Pan-Am. Geologist, vol. 
55, 1931, p. 315. 

The northern area of Connecticut Valley Trias sic: 
Am. Jour. Sci., vol. 23, 1932, p. 57-77. 

Chrysotile asbestos; II, Chrysotile solutions: Econ. 
Geology, vol. 27, 1932, p. 281-296. 

The Vermont marble belt: Internat. Geol. Cong., XVI, 
United States, Guidebook 1, Excursion A-l, 1933, 
p. 75-80. 






8 



Brandon to Bennington, Vermont: Internat. Geol. 

Cong., XVI, United States, Guidebook 1, Excur- 
sion A-l, 1933, p. 80-87. 

(with C. R. Longwell) Amherst, Mass,, to Hartford, 
Conn.: Internat. Geol. Cong., XVI, United 
States, Guidebook 1, Excursion A-l, 1933, 
p. 105-111. 

Calcite marble: Econ. Geology, vol. 29, 1935, p. 
121-139. 

Land and sea on the Canadian Shield in pre- Cambrian 
time, H. C. Cooke: Am. Jour. Sci., vol. 27, 
1934, p. 303-306. 

Service of the surveys (abstract): Assoc. Am, State 
Geologists, Jour., vol. 5, 1934, p. 7-8. 

Relieved and strained rock (abstract, with discus- 
sion); Geol. Soc. America, 1934, p. 62-64. 

Serpent inization; origin of certain asbestos, talc, 
and soaps tone deposits: Econ. Geology, vol. 29, 

1934, p. 397-400. 

Problems of serpent inization: Econ. Geology, vol. 

29, 1934, p. 703. 
Pyrite oxidation: Econ. Geology, vol. 30, 1935, 

p. 166-169. 
Mining marble: Amer. Inst. Min. Met. Eng., Tech. 

Pub. 626, 1935, 18 p. 
Mongolian magmas: Bull. Geol. Soc. Am., vol. 46, 

1935, p. 1745-1814. 

Petrology of marble: Mineralogist, vol. 4, (February) 

1936, p. 3-4, 30-31; (March) 1936, p. 5-6, 36- 
37. 

Mechanics of metasomatism: Econ. Geology, vol. 31, 
1936, p. 505-526. 

Preliminary report on the marble deposits of Canada 
Bay and White Bay, northern Newfoundland: 
Newfoundland Dept. Nat. Res. Geol. sec, 1936, 

7 P. 
Serpentinization of Vermont ultrabasics: Geol. Soc. 

America Bull., vol. 47, 1936:, p. 1961-1979; 

abstract, Proc. 1935, 1936, p. 64. 
Marble depostis of northern Newfoundland: Newfound- 
land Dept. Nat. Res. Geol. sec. Bull. 11, 1937, 

43 p. 
Roof of the Treasury Mountain granite (abstract): 

Geol. Soc. America Proc. 1936, 1937, p. 62-63. 
Central Vermont Marble Belt, Guidebook, 34th Annual 

Field meeting, 1938, Rutland, Vermont. N. E. 

Intercollegiate Geological Association. Amherst 

College, Amherst, Mass. 
Correlatives of the Grenville Series: Geol. Soc. 

America Bull., vol. 49, 1938, p. 1807-1827; 

abstract, p. 1929. 
Central marble belt (abstract): Geol. Soc. America 

Bull., vol. 49, 1938, p. 1863-1364. 



Spontaneous rock expansion (abstract): Geol. Soc. 

America Bull., vol. 49, 1938, p. 1864. 
(Review of) Thetford, Disraeli, and eastern half of 

Warwick map-areas, Quebec, by Harold Caswell 

Cooke, with chapters by Thomas Henry Clark, 

1937: Econ. Geol., vol. 34, 1939, p. 235-237. 
Treasure Mountain intrusive (abstracts): Geol. Soc. 

America Bull., vol. 50, 1939; p. 1899; Pan-Am. 

Geol., vol. 73, 1940, p. 156. 
Geological, chemical and physical problems in the 

marble industry: AIME, Tech. Pub. 1261, Mining 

Technology, vol. 4, 1940, 16 p.; Trans., vol. 

144, 1941, p. 324-339. 
The perspectograph: Econ. Geology, vol. 36, 1941, 

p. 71-83. 
Measuring grain boundaries in crystalline rocks: 

Jour. Geol., vol. 49, 1941, p. 199-206. 
The Holyoke Range and Connecticut Valley structure: 

Am. Jour. Sci., vol. 239, 1941, p. 261-275. 
(with H. A, Meyerhoff) The flow of time in the 

Connecticut Valley, geological imprints: 

Hampshire Bookshop, Northampton, Mass., 1942, 

129 p. 
Vermont talc and asbestos deposits in Newhouse, W. H. 

ed., Ore deposits as related to structural 

features, 1942, p. 255-258. 
Granitization in western New England (abstract): 

Geol. Soc. Am. Bull., vol. 51, 1940, p. 1989. 
African rift valleys and American Triassic troughs 

(abstract): Geol. Soc. Am. Bull., vol. 52, 

1941, p. 1889. 
Geology of the Fissionable Materials; Econ. Geol., 

vol. 45, 1950, p. 273-323. 
The geology, paragenesis, and reserves of the ores of 

lead and zinc: Econ. Geol. vol. 45, 1950, p. 

588-590. 
The age of the "Lower Cretaceous" from Bis bee, 

Arizona, Uraninite: Econ. Geol., vol. 47, 1952, 

p. 305-315. 
Mapping Climatic Zones of the Geologic Past: Yale 

Scientific Mag., vol. 27, 1953. 
(with John H. Beebe) Scale model reproduction of 

tension faults: Am. Jour. Sci., vol. 252, 1954, 

p. 745-754. 
Concentration of brines and deposition of salts from 

sea water under frigid conditions: Discussion, 

Am. Jour. Sci., vol. 254, 1956, p. 758-760. 
Granite origin and type of associated mineralization: 

XX Cong. Geol. Internacional, Resumenes de los 

Trabajos Presentados, Mexico, 1956. 
Mapping climates of the geologic past: XX Cong. Geol. 

Internacional, Resumenes de los Trabajos Presen- 
tados, Mexico, 1956. 
Discussion of tirano- Organic ores: Econ. Geol., vol. 

52, 1957, p. 192-196. 



i 



10 



Geology of the northern part-Connecticut Valley, 
Guidebook: 49th Meeting, N. E. Geol. Conf., 
1957. 

Possible permian climatic zonation and its applica- 
tion: Discussion, Am. Jour. Sci., vol. 256, 
p. 596-600. 

Triassic age rift structure in eastern North Ameri- 
ca: Trans. N. Y. Acadm. of Sci. Ser. II, vol, 
19, 1957, p. 489-502. 

Patterns to ores in layered rocks: Econ. Geol., 
vol. 55, 1960, p. 695-731. 

Mineral resource Areas: McGraw-Hill Encyclopedia 
of Science and Technology, 1960, 

Climatic zones of the Paleozoic Era: Int. Geol. 
Con. XXI Session, Copenhagen, 1960. 

Climates of the geologic past: in S. E. P. M. Sym- 
posium on "Polar Wandering and Continental 
Drift.'* In press. 

United States Atomic Energy Corom. Reports : 

Uranium in the Dirty Devil Shinarump Channel Depos- 
it, RMO 66, June 1952, 

Uranium deposits in southwestern Colorado plateau, 
RMO 982, August 1952. 

Experimental simulation of plateau type uranium 
deposits, RMO 44, January 1953. 

(with Hans Schreiber) Influences on migration Of 

uranium and. radioactivity, RME 3086, Jan. 1954. 

Reconnaissance for uranium in the Phosphor ia Forma- 
tion, RME 3141, June 1956. 

Gerald P. Brophy: 

Preliminary report on the Papsy's Hope Prospect: 

USAEC RMO 833, 1951. 
Preliminary memorandum on the Flat Tire Prospect, 

Marysvale, Utah: USAEC RMO 863, 1951. 
(with P. F. Kerr, H. M. Dahl, J. Green, and L. E. 

Woolard) Geologic Guide to the Marysvale area: 

USAEC RMO 924, May 1952. 
The La Veta Prospect near Marysvale, Utah: USAEC 

RME 3046, 1953. 
Hydrous uranium molybdate in Marysvale (Utah) Ore 

(Urnohoite, a new uranium mineral): USAEC RME 

3046, 1953. 
Geology and uranium mineralization in the Silica 

Hills area, Marysvale, Utah: Ph. D. disserta- 
tion, Univ. of Minn. Microfilm series, 1954. 
(with P. F. Kerr, H. M. Dahl, J. Green, and L. E. 

Woolard) Marysvale, Utah, uranium area: Geol. 

Soc, Am., Special Paper 64, 1957. 
Copper mineralization in the Catoctin formation of 

Virginia: Bull. Geol. Soc. Am., vol. 71, 1960, 

p. 1834. 



11 



Sulphate Studies I: Alunite-jarosite solid solu- 
tion: Bull. Geol. Soc. Am., vol. 71, 1960, 
p. 1834-1835. 

(with E, S. Scott, and R. A. Snellgrove) Sulphate 
Studies II: Solid solution between alunite 
and jarosite: In press, Am. Mineralogist. 

Anthony Reso: 

The Devonian system in the Pahranagat Range, Lincoln 
Co., Nevada: Bull. Geol. Soc. Am., vol. 70, 
1959, p. 1249-1252. 

Devonian reefs in the Pahranagat Range, southeastern 
Nevada: Bull. Geol. Soc. Am., vol. 70, 1959, 
p. 1661. 

(with A. Dolgoff, J. J. W. Rogers, and C. Croneis) 
Tertiary volcanic stratigraphy in the Pahrana- 
gat Range, Nevada: Science, 1960. 

Albert E. Wood: 

Damsite surveying by seismograph: Eng. News -Record, 

vol. 124, 1940, p. 46-49. 
The mammalian fauna of the White River Oligocene; Pt, 

3, Lagomorpha: Am. Philos. Soc. Trans., vol. 28, 

1940, p. 271-362. 
Multiple banding of sediments deposited during a 

single season: Am. Jour. Sci., vol. 245, 1947, 

p, 304-312; abs., Geol. Soc. Am. Bull., vol. 57, 

1946, p. 1245. 

Miocene rodents from Florida: Harvard Coll. Mus. 

Comp. Zoology Bull., vol. 99, 1947, p. 489-494. 
Rodents, a study in evolution: Evolution, vol. 1, 

1947, p. 154-162. 

Glacial stream diversion near Hornell, New York: 

Geol. Soc. Am. Bull., vol. 59, 1948, p. 1285- 

1306; abs., vol. 57, 1946, p. 1245. 
Small mammals from the uppermost Eocene (Duchesnian) 

near Badwater, Wyoming: Jour. Paleontology, vol. 

23, 1949, p. 556-565. 
Early Tertiary rodents of the family Paramyidae (abs): 

Geol. Soc. Am. Bull., vol. 57, 1946, p. 1245. 
Porcupines, paleogeography, and parallelism: Evolu- 
tion, vol. 4, 1950, p. 87-98. 
A new geomyid rodent from the Miocene of Montana: 

Carnegie Mus. Annals, vol. 31, 1950, p. 335-338. 
Tooth-marks on bones of the Orleton Farms mastodon: 

Ohio Jour. Sci., vol. 52, 1952, p. 27-28. 
(with John Ormsbee) Notes on irammals from the Upper 

Cretaceous Lance formation of Wyoming: Jour. 

Paleontology, vol. 28, 1954, p. 26-31. 
Comments on the classification of rodents: Breviora, 

no. 41, 1954, 9 p. 
(with D. R. Kelley) The Eocene mammals from the Lysite 

member, Wind River Formation of Wyoming: Jour. 

Paleo., vol. 28, 1954, p. 337-366. 



12 



A revised classification of the rodents: Jour, 

Mammalogy, vol. 36, 1955, p. 165-187. 
Rodentc from the lower Oligocene Yoder formation of 

Wyoming: Jour. Paleontology, vol. 29, 1955, 

p. 519-524. 
(with C. C. Black) Variation and tooth- replacement 

in a Miocene mylagaulid rodent: Jour. Paleo., 

vol. 30, 1956, p. 672-684. 
Mytonomys, a new genus of paramyid rodent from the 

upper Eocene: Jour. Paleo. vol. 30, 1956, p. 

753-755. 

EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM: A graduate program leading to the Master's 
degree was in effect at one time, but was discontinued 
owing to the small number of graduate students, which was 
considered inadequate to provide the type of atmosphere 
conducive to maximum effectiveness. The following courses, 
however, while offered for advanced undergraduates, are 
considered to be suitable also for graduate students: 

"Soft Rock" group: 

44. Sedimentation and stratigraphy 
49, Invertebrate paleontology 

55. Vertebrate paleontology 

"Hard Rock" group: 
*24. Petrology 

45. Mineral deposits 
79A. Structural geology 

Geography and Geology: 
*26-28. Regional geology and geography of the World 

46. World resources. 

*These are not terminal courses but require a very ad- 
vanced level of inquiry. 



13 



RESOURCES AT MOUNT HOLYOJIE COLLEGE : 

DEPARTMENTAL FACILITIES: 

Laboratories for the basic branches of geology 

Standard laboratory equipment, with petrographic micro- 
scopes, two universal stages, ore microscopes, and 
polishing equipment . 

Collections : 

Balk collection of hand specimens and thin sections 
keyed in with geologic maps for several 
quadrangles in western Massachusetts. 

Ore specimens from Leadville, San Juan Mts., Tintic, 
Homes take, Chihuahua, Flin-Flon and other 
mining districts, including many rare items. 

Pegmatite and other minerals from numerous locali- 
ties, including many rare specimens. 

Hand specimens of Alpine rocks 

Meyerhoff collection of rocks and fossils from Virgin 
Islands 

Lochman-Balk collection of Cambrian and other tri- 
lobites 

Collection of beach sands from widely separated areas 

Tertiary and recent microfossils from Egypt and 
America 

Systematic paleontological collection 

Phosphate and fluorspar rocks and minerals 

Alkaline rocks from Mt. Royal, Quebec 

Library: departmental library includes standard period- 
icals, survey publications, and reference works, with 
the Sederholon library on Scandinavian and pre- 
Cambrian geology as a special feature. 

DEPARTMENTAL FACULTY: 

John C. Haff, Professor 
Training: 

A. B., Columbia, 1932 
M. A., Columbia, 1933 
Ph. D., Columbia, 1939 
Professional experience: 

Cutting traveling fellow from Columbia to 

Innsbruck and Zurich, 1936-37 
Instructor, Wichita University, 1938-39 
Asst. Prof., Colo. School of Mines, 1939-47 
Assoc. Geol., U. S. Bureau of Reclamation, 

1938-39, 1941-42, 1945-46 
Geologist, U. S. Geological Survey, 1942-43, 

1948-50 
Geologist, Wyoming State Geol. Survey, 1944 
Consultant, U.S. Atomic Energy Comm., div. raw 

materials 



14 



Geologist, Mineral resources survey of Navajo 
and Hopi Indian Reservations, 1954 

Fulbright research scholar, Innsbruck, 1956-57 
Membership in professional and honorary societies: 

Sigma Xi 

Geological Society of America 

Mineralogical Society of America 

Amer. Assoc. Adv. Science 
Subjects taught: 

Physical geology 

Mineralogy 

Lithology 

Economic geology 

Structural Geology 
Research interests and activities: 

Petro fabric analysis 

Economic geology 

Althea Page Smith, Instructor (part-time to full-time) 
Training: 

B. A., Pembroke, 1928 

M. S., Brown, 1930 

Ph. D., Radcliffe, 1940 
Professional experience: 

Instructor, University of Vermont, 1930-31 

Present position, 1960 to date 
Membership in professional and honorary societies: 

Sigma Xi 

Phi Beta Kappa 
Subjects taught: 

General geology 

Geomorphology 

Paleontology 
Research interests: 

Petrology and structure of igneous intrusives 

Geomorphology 

FACULTY PUBLICATIONS AND REPORTS: 
John C. Haff: 

Crystallized native copper from Franklin, N. J.: 

Amer. Min., vol. 19, 1934, p. 480-482. 
Igneous rock names and their evaluation: Amer. Min., 

vol. 21, 1936, p. 427-441. 
Preparation of petro fabric diagrams: Amer. Min., vol. 

23, 1938, p. 543-574. 
Multiple dikes of Cape Neddick: Geol. Soc. Amer. 

Bull., vol. 50, 1939, p. 465-514. 
Memorandum on the results of a petrographic study of 

the Keswick quartz-diorite : U. S. Bur. 

Rec. Petr. Lab. Rept. 20, 1938, 36 p. 
Use of the Wulff net in mineral determination with 

the universal stage: Amer. Min., vol. 25, 1940, 

p. 689-707. 



15 



Determination of extinction angles in augite and 
hornblende with the universal stage according 
to the method of Conrad Burri: Amer. Jour. Sci., 
vol. 239, 1941, p. 489-492. 

Preliminary petrographic study of certain rocks near 
the western terminus of the Continental Divide 
tunnel: U. S. Bur. Rec. Petr. Lab. Rept. 26, 

1941, 28 p. 

Contaminated complex dikes at Cape Neddick, Maine: 

Jour. Geol., vol. 49, 1941, p. 835-853. 
Petrographic study of rocks from shear zone in the 

Continental Divide tunnel: U. S. Bur. Rec. 

Petr. Lab. Rept. 27, 1942, 23 p. 
Petrographic examination of selected Cowlitz River 

gravel: U. S. Bur. Rec. Petr. Lab. Rept. 33, 

1942, 7 p. 

Fedorow method (universal stage) of indicatrix orien- 
tation: Colo. School Mines Quart., vol. 37, 
1942, p. 2-28. 

Petrology applied to aggregates for concrete: Colo. 
School Mines Quart., vol. 37, 1942, p. 39-48. 

Alkaline vitrophyre dike, Cape Neddick, Maine: Amer„ 
Min., vol. 28, 1943, p. 426-436. 

Petrology of two clastic dikes from the Placerville 
district, Colo.: Amer. Jour. Sci., vol. 242, 
1944, p. 204-217. 

Features of geologic structure on the Blue River- 
South Platte Transmountain diversion line: 
Geol. Soc. Amer. Bull., vol. 57, 1946, p. 1199. 

Chapters in: Mineral Resources, Navajo-Hopi Indian 
Reservations, Ariz. -Utah: Univ. Ariz, College 
Mines, 1955, 3 vols. 

Althea Page Smith: 

(with L. Kingsley and A. W. Quinn) Geology of the Mt. 

Chocoroa quadrangle, N. H.: N. H. State Plann. 

Devel. Comm., 1939, 24 p. and geol. map. 
Perthite from central New Hampshire: Geol. Soc. Amer. 

Bull., vol. 51, 1940, p. 1946-1947. 
Olivine and pyroxene of Mt. Tripyramid, N. H.: Amer. 

Min., vol. 26, 1941, p. 202-203. 
(with H. T. U. Smith) Periglacial rock streams in th« 

Blue Ridge area: Geol. Soc. Amer. Bull., vol. 

56, 1945, p. 1198. 

EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM: Provision for graduate work in geology has 
been in effect through the years, but has been restricted 
recently because of insuff icier t staff; the present program 
is directed primarily toward undergraduate instruction. 



16 

RESOURCES AT SMITH COLLEGE : 

DEPARTMENTAL FACILITIES: 

Laboratories for the basic branches of geology 

Standard laboratory equipment, including microscopes, 

universal stage, X-ray machine and d'Orbigny models 
of f oraminif era . 

Collections : 

Paleontological : 

Stratigraphic and lithologic suites of represen- 
tative formations 

Systematic collections of invertebrate fossils, 
with emphasis on microfossils 

Some vertebrate fossils and paleobotanical 
material 
Maps: 

Army Map Service set of topographic and base 
maps, world-wide. 

U. S. Geological Survey topographic and geologic 
maps 

State geologic maps 

Geologic maps for numerous foreign countries 

Library: departmental library contains standard periodi- 
cals and reference works, including many that are 
comparatively rare; unusually complete set of state 
geological survey publications ; British and French 
literature well represented; literature on micro- 
paleontology, with special reference to foraminif- 
era, unusually complete. 

DEPARTMENTAL FACULTY: 

Caroline Heminway Kierstead, Assoc. Prof. 
Training: 

A. B., Mt. Holyoke College, 1925 

A. M., Cornell, 1928 

Ph. D., University of Indiana, 1941 
Professional experience: 

Instructor to Associate Prof., Smith College, 
1928 to date. 

Senior Paleontologist, Shell Oil Co., 1943-45. 
Membership in professional and honorary societies: 

Sigma Xi 

Paleontological Society 

Am&r. Assoc. Petroleum Geologists 

Paleontological Research Institute 

Amer. Assoc. Adv. Sci. 
Subjects taught: 

Paleontology 

Stratigraphy 

Structural and field geology 



17 



Research interests and activities: 

Tertiary and recent foraminifera 

Paleontology of deep-sea cores 

Revision of Galloway's Manual of Foraminifera 

Marshall Schalk, Associate Professor 
Training: 

A. B., Harvard, 1929 
A, M., Harvard, 1931 
Ph. D., Harvard, 1936 
Professional iexperience: 
Humble Oil Co., 1929 

Asst. geol., Moctesuma Copper Co., 1929-30 
Hamman Exploration Co., 1931-32 
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute, 1933-34 
Instructor, Smith College, 1934-36 
Geologist, Gulf Oil Corp., 1936-41 
Asst. Prof, to Assoc, Prof,, Smith College, 1941 

to date 
Asst. to director, Woods Hole, 1946-47 
Research assoc, Hydrographic Office, U. S. Navy, 

1948 
Research geologist or Arctic Institute of North 

America project in Alaska, 6 years, summers 

and sabbatical year. 
Membership in professional societies: 
Geol. Soc. Amer. 
Amer. Geophysical Union 
Assoc. College Geol. Teachers 
Subjects taught: 

General geology 
Petroleum geology 
Research interests and activities: 
Coastal sedimentation 
Oceanography 

Helen Stobbe, Assoc. Prof. 
Training: 

A. 3., Smith College, 1924 

A. M., Columbia, 1931 

Ph. D, , Columbia, 1947 
Professional experience: 

Teacher of geol. and chem., Stuart Hall, Va., 
1924-26 

Geol. asst., Amerada Petroleum Corp., 1928-30 

Curator, Smith College, 1930-32 

Instructor to Assoc. Prof., Smith, 1932 to date 
Membership in professional societies: 

Gecl. Soc. Amer. 

Mineralogical Society 

Amer. Assoc, Adv. Sex. 
Subjects taught: 

Economic geology 

Mineralogy 

Petrology 



18 



Research interests and activities: 
Pegmatites 
Igneous petrology 

FACULTY PUBLICATIONS: 

Caroline Kierstead: 

(with J. J. Galloway) The Tertiary foraminifera of 

Puerto Rico: N. Y. Acad. Sci., Scient. Surv. 

of Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, vol. 3, 

pt. 4, 1941, p. 275-491. 
Women in geology: Geol. Soc. Amer., Interim Proc, 

Pt. I, 1947, p. 66-69. 
(with Rosalind Robinson) Foraminifera of a deep-sea 

core from the Ross Sea, Antarctica: Geol. Soc. 

Amer. Bull., vol. 63, 1952, p. 1271. 
The Dry Brook Valley trip, in: Guidebook for Amherst 

meeting of the New Engl, Intercoll. Geol. Field 

Conf. - 49th Ann. Mtg., Amherst, Mass., 1957, 

4 P. 
Contributor on paleontologic terms to: Glossary of 
Geology and related sciences, edited by J. V. 
Howell, Amer. Geol. Inst., 1957, 325 p. 

Marshall Schalk: 

(with R. F. Collins) Torrential flood erosion in the 
Connecticut valley, March, 1936: Amer. Jour. 
Sci., vol. 34, 1937, p. 293-307. 

A textural study of the outer beach of Cape Cod, Mass: 
Jour. Sed. Petrol., vol. 8, 1938, p. 41-52. 

A study of textural changes in a beach by repeated 
samplings: Jour. Sed. Petrol., vol. 16, 1946, 
p. 43-51. 

Submarine topography off Eleuthera Island, Bahamas: 
Geol. Soc. Amer. Bull., vol. 57, 1946, p. 1228. 

A lecture demonstration of limestone solution and pre- 
cipitation: Jour, Geol. Educ, vol. 4, 1956, 
p. 52. 

Relation of arctic storms to shore-line changes at 
Point Barrow, Alaska: Geol. Soc. Amer, Bull., 
vol. 68, 1957, p. 1792. 

Beach and near-shore studies, Point Barrow, Alaska, 
July 1954 - January 1957: Woods Hole Oceano- 
graphic Institution, 1957, 49 p. 

Comparison of near shore bottom profiles of the 

Barrow area as compared with those to the south- 
west and east of Point Barrow (abstract): Ninth 
Alaskan Science Conference, Univ. of Alaska, 1958. 

A light-weight bottom sampler for sand or gravel 

(abstract): Jour. Geophysical Research, 1960, 
p. 2521. 

In preparation: report on six years 1 field studies 
at Point Barrow, Alaska. 



19 



Helen Stobbe; 

A brief description of the pegmatites southwest of 

Custer, S. D.: Econ. Geol., vol. 32, 1937, 

p, 964-973. 
Intrusive complex near Northampton, Mass.: Geol. 

Soc. Amer. Bull., vol. 49, 1938, p. 1960-1961. 
The Ottawa Lowland Excursion: Geol. Soc. Amer. Proc, 

1938, p. 233. 
The Gatineau Excursion: Geol. Soc. Amer. Proc, 1938, 

p. 233-234. 
Petrology of volcanic rocks of northeastern New Mex- 
ico: Geol. Soc. Amer. Bull., vol. 60, 1949, 

Pc 1041-1095. 
The Gillette quarry, Haddam Neck, Conn,: Rocks and 

Min., vol. 24, 1949, p. 496-502. 
Dacites from Laughlin Peak, Colfax County, N. M.: 

Geol. Soc. Amer. Bull., vol. 60, 1949, p. 1922. 
Porphyry intrusions in the Beartooth Range, near Red 

Lodge, Mont.: Geol. Soc. Amer. Bull., vol. 63, 

1952, p. 1300. 
(with E. G. Murray) A new occurrence of eucolite 

near Wausau, Marathon County, Wis.: Amer. Min., 

vol. 41, 1956, p. 932-935. 
(with others) The Triassic Stratigraphic Section: 

Guidebook, Geology of Northern Part- Connecticut 

Valley, N. Eng. Geol. Conf., 1957, p. 34-38. 
Feldspar relationships in monzonite porphyries near 

Red Lodge, Montana (abstract): Inter. Geol. 

Cong., Report of the 21st Session, Norden, 

Copenhagen, 1960, p. 121-122. 

PRESENT GRADUATE PROGRAM: A graduate program leading to the 
Master 1 s degree has been in effect for more than 
thirty years, and numerous degrees have been awarded. 
Courses offered are as follows; 

Courses open only to graduate students: 

50. Research and thesis 

51. Individual problems in geology or geography. 

52. Paleontology or stratigraphy. 

53. Phy s iography 

54. Structural geology 

55. Crystallography, mineralogy, petrology or gemology 
57. Petroleum geology 

Courses open to graduates and advanced undergraduates: 
41. Special studies in geology or geography 
46 . Micropaleontology . 



20 

RESOURC E S AT THE UNIVFRSITY : 

PRESENT DEPARTMENTAL mCILITIES: 

Space : The department now has approximately 20,700 square 
feet of sloor space in section 3 of Morrill Hall, 
including the following: Office space for 2 
secretaries, 8 faculty members, and 18 graduate 
students . 
Laboratories for the following subjects: 
Physical geology 
Historical geology 
Mineralogy 

Petrology - economic geology 
Geomorphology - photogeology 
Paleontology - stratigraphy 
Sedimentation 

Geophysics - structural geology 
X-ray studies 
General utility rooms for: 

Storage of maps and collections 
Drafting 

Cutting, grinding, and polishing of specimens 
Photographic work of all types 
Wood and metal working for production of exper- 
imental equipment 

Equipment : 

Standard equipment, typical of geology department in 

general: 

Binocular microscopes, with mechanical stages 
and other accessories 

Petrographic microscopes with universal stage, 
integrating stage, and other accessories 

Ore microscopes for polished sections 

Abbe refractometer 

Metallograph for photomicorgraphy 

Equipment for preparing thin sections and 
polished sections of rocks and minerals 

Screens and shaker for mechanical analysis 

Centrifuge 

Sample splitters 

Isodynamic magnetic mineral separator 

X-ray machine with powder camera 

Differential thermal analysis unit (on order) 

Calculating machine 

Dip needle 

Magnetometer 

Telescopic alidades and plane table outfits 

Brunton compasses, hand levels, and other minor 
field equipment 

Altimeters 

PortaJble rock drill 

Lathe, drill, power saw, and other shop equip- 
ment 



21 



Standard drafting equipment, including panto- 
graph, drafting arms, light table, Kail 
enlarging- reducing projector, etc. 
Mimeographing, duplicating, copying, and ozalid 
machines 
Special equipment: the collection of photogrammetric 
instruments, including stereoscopes, vertical 
and oblique sketchmasters , stereocomparagraphs, 
stereotope, multiscope, template cutter, metal 
templates, Kail radial-line plotter, slope 
comparator, etc. is believed to be the most ex- 
tensive in any geology department in the New 
England area. 
Other available equipment outside of the geology de- 
partment: 

Electron microscope 
IBM 1620 electronic computer 

Collections : 

Mineralogical, petrologiCj paleontological, and 

economic materials: excellent collections in 
these categories include the historic Hitchcock 
collection of Massachusetts rocks and minerals, 
the Fitts collection of minerals, various sets 
of rocks, ores, and economic minerals from many 
parts of the U. S. and other countries, and 
representative fossils for the entire geologic 
time scale. 

Maps: Topographic and geologic maps for all parts of 
the U. S. are on file, together with many for 
other parts of North America and for other con- 
tinents . 

Air photos: the collection of air photos is believed 
to be the largest in any geology department east 
of Illinois, and includes representative geologic 
and topographic features from nearly all contin- 
ents. 

Library : The departmental library contains U. S, Geologi- 
cal Survey publications, standard American periodi- 
cals, some European periodicals, some state survey and 
Canadian survey publications, and standard reference 
works. It is supplemented by the Hampshire Inter- 
Library Center, on campus, and by inter-library loan 
services. For specialized topics, the Harvard library, 
one of the finest in the U. S., is within commuting 
distance . 

DEPARTMENTAL FACULTY (as of September, 1961): 

Graduate faculty : 

H. T. U. Smith, Department Head: 
Training: 

B. S., Wooster College, 1930 



22 



M. A., Harvard, 1933 
Ph. D., Harvard, 1936 
Professional experience: 

Austin Teaching Fellow, Harvard, 1931-35 

Instructor to Assoc. Professor, Univ. of 
Kansas, 1935-43, 1946-56. 

Geologist, Kansas State Geological Surv., 
summers, 1936-41 

Geologist, Imperial Oil Ltd., summer, 1943 

Geologist, U. S. Geological Survey (Military- 
Geology Branch), 1943-46 

Consultant on photo interpretation, Research 
and Development Board, U. S. Defense 
Dept., 1953 

Consultant on photo interpretation, U. S. 
Forest Service, 1953-56 

Present position, 1956 to date 
Membership in professional and honorary societies: 

Phi Beta Kappa 

Sigma Xi 

Phi Kappa Phi 

Geol. Soc. America 

Amer. Soc. Photogrammetry - served as second 
vice president, panel member and chair- 
man at annual meetings, organizer and 
editor of symposia, and chairman of 
photo interpretation committee. 

Amer. Assoc. Adv. Sci. 

Arctic Inst. North America 

Assoc. Amer. Geographers 

Institute Italiano di Paleontologia Umano - 
honorary corresponding member 

Amer. Assoc. Petrol, Geologists 

Assoc. Coll. Geol. Teachers 

Boston Geol. Soc. 
Other professional activities: 

Member, editorial board of Quaternaria 

Inter. Geol. Cong. - participated in meet- 
ings of 1952 in Algiers, 1956 in Mex- 
ico, and 1960 in Denmark. 

Inter. Geographical Cong. - participated in 
meetings of 1952 in Washington, D. C, 
and 1960 in Sweden. 

Cong. Inter, Assoc. Quaternary Res. - partic- 
ipated in 1953 meeting in Italy, and 
1957 meeting in Spain; appointed by 
National Academy of Science as member 
of official U. S. delegation to 1961 
meeting in Poland. 

National Research Council: 

Member, Committee on Inter-relations 

of Pleistocene Research, 1947-49. 
Co-chairman, Committee for Study of 

Eolian Deposits, 1948-52. 
Member, Earth Sci. Division, 1956-59. 



23 



Currently member of Executive Committee 
of the U. S. Committee for the 
International Quaternary Associa- 
tion. 
Subjects taught: 
Geomorphology 
Photogeology 
Research interests and activities: 

Use of air photo interpretation as a geo- 
logic research technique. 
Studies on periglacial cryopedologic 

phenomena . 
Studies on sand dunes and related features 

in the coastal desert of Peru. 
Preparation of a monographic treatment of 

Eolian Geology. 
Geomorphic studies on the N. England coast. 
Research grants and contracts: 

Grant from Geol. Soc. Amer. to study peri- 
glacial features in southern Wisconsin, 
1942. 
Three contracts with Office of Naval Re- 
search, 1949-60, totaling approximately 
$42,500, for studying sand dunes. 

Oswald C. Farquhar, Professor: 
Training: 

B. A., Oxford University, 1947, with first- 
class honors. 
M. A., Oxford University, 1948. 
Ph. D., Aberdeen University, Scotland, 1951. 
Professional experience: 

Coal exploration in England, 1947-47. 
Summer work on military- engineering, 1948, 

1953. 
Studies on metamorphic rocks in Great 

Britain, 1950-53. 
Geological survey of an area in northeast 

Africa, 1952. 
Lecturer at Aberdeen University, 1948-53. 
Assistant Professor, Univ. of Kansas, 1953- 

1957. 
Assoc. Professor, Univ. of Mass., 1957-61. 
Professor, Univ. of Mass., 1961--. 
Visiting lecturer, Univ. of Calif., summer 

session, 1955. 
Consultant and field exploration geologist 

for mining companies in Canada, 1957, 

1959. 
Membership in professional and honorary societies: 
Geol. Soc. Amer. 
Amer. Assoc. Petrol. Geologists 
Geologists' Assoc, of Great Britain 
Geol. Soc. London 
Sigma Xi 



24- 



Other professional activities: 

Inter, Geol. -Cong. - participated in 1948 
meeting in London and 1960 meeting 
in Denmark. 

Participation in meetings of Prospectors T 
and Developers 1 Assoc, of Canada. 

Meetings of N. Y, State Geologists Field 
Conference . 

Meetings of N. England Intercoll. Geol. 
Field Conference. 
Subjects taught: 

Structural geology 

Igenous and metsmorphic petrology 

Engineering geology 

Economic geology of the metals and non- 
metals . 
Research interests and activities: 

Regional geology of western Massachusetts 

Engineering geology of the N. England area 

World-wide occurrence of asbestos 

Special laboratory techniques in the geo- 

sciences 

Occurrence and utilization of industrial 

rocks, minerals, and ores 

Ward S. Motts, Associate Professor: 
Training: 

B. A., Columbia, 1949. 
M. S., Univ. of Minnesota, 1951. 
Ph. D. , Univ. of Illinois, 1957. 
Professional experience: 

Mining geologist, Mexico, summer, 1949. 
Engineering and ground-water geologist, U. 

S. Bureau of Reclamation, Calif., 

1951-53. 
Ground-water geologist, U. S. Geol. Surv., 

New Mexico, 1953-60. 
Geologist, Oklahoma Geol. Surv., and Assoc. 

Prof., Univ. of Oklahoma, 1960-61. 
Present position starting Sept., 1961. 
Membership in professional and honorary societies: 
Geol. Soc. Amer. 
Sigma Xi 

Roswell Geol. Soc. 
Oklahoma City Geol. Soc. 
Subjects to be taught: 

Ground-water geology 
Sedimentology 
Pleistocene Geology 
Regional geomorphology 
Evolution of geologic concepts 
Research interests and activities: 

Quality of ground water as influenced by 

geologic and hydorlogic factors. 
Occurrence of ground water in relation to 

Pleistocene geology. 



25 



George E. McGill, Assistant Professor: 
Training: 

B. A., Carleton College, cum laude, 1953. 

M. S., Univ. of Minnesota, 1955. 

Ph. D., Princeton, 1^58 (NSF pre-doctoral 
Fellow during terminal year) 
Professional experience: 

Work for mining companies, summers, 1952-53. 

Part-time laboratory instructor in geology 
at Minnesota and Princeton, 1954-56. 

Curatorial assistant, Princeton, 1956-57, 

Stratigraphic and structural studies in 

Montana for Shell Oil Co., and Montana 
Bureau of Mines, summers, 1954-57. 

Instructor in field geology, Red Lodge field 
camp, summers, 1958-61. 

Present position, 1958 to date. 
Membership in professional and honorary societies; 

Phi Beta Kappa 

Sigma Xi 

Geol. Soc. Amer. 

Yellows tone- Beartooth Research Assoc. - 
currently serving as secretary. 
Subjects taught: 

Advanced structural geology 

Regional geology 

Field geology 

Physical geology 
Research interests and activities: 

Geology of New England 

Mechanics of structures in the Montana 
Rockys 

Experimental high-pr:-jsure studies on rock 
deformation 
Research grants: 

National Science Foundation grant for 
studies in Montana on a three-year 
basis, approximately $10,000. 

Application made for a grant from the Re- 
search Corporation for experimental 
studies. 



w >^ ^ -_*, .i, w **. « 

Gregory W. Webb, Assistant Professor: 
Training: 

B. A., Columbia, 1948. 
M. A., Columbia, 1950. 
Ph. D., Columbia, 1954, 



rn. jj., uo-Lumoia, j.y^^. 
Professional experience: 

Lecturer in geology, Columbia, 1949-50. 
Assistant in geology, Columbia, 1950-51. 
Instructor in geology, Rutgers, 1951-52. 
Geologist and geophysicist, Standard Oil 

Company of Calif., 1952-56. 
Instructor to Assistant Prof., Amherst 

College, 1956-59. 



26 



Present position, 1959 to date 
Membership in professional and honorary societies: 

Sigma Xi 

Geol. Soc. Amer. 

Amer. Assoc. Petrol. Geologists 

Amer. Geophysical Union 
Subjects taught and to be taught: 

Sedimentation 

Stratigraphy 

Petroleum geology 

Cenozoic geology 

Marine geology 
Research interests and activities: 

Rift faults and associated structures 

Palinspactic maps 

Experimental studies of turbidity currents 

Structural geology of New Brunswick 

Undergraduate faculty - offering some courses open to 
graduate students: 

Warren I. Johansson, Assistant Professor: 
Training: 

B. S., Univ. of Mass., 1947. 

M. S., Univ. of Mass., 1948. 

Ph. D. (biology), Univ. of Mass., 1955. 
Professional experience: 

Instructor to Assistant Prof., Univ. of 
Mass., 1948 to date. 

Geologist, Vermont Geol. Surv., summers, 
1956-59. 
Membership in professional and honorary societies: 

Sigma Xi 

Soc. Econ. Paleontologists & Mineralogists 
Subjects taught: 

Historical geology 

Invertebrate paleontology and micropaleon. 
Research interests and activities: 

Micropaleontology 

Albert B. Nelson, Assistant Professor: 
Training: 

B. S., Colby College, 1933. 

M. S., Middlebury College, 1935. 

Ph. D. expected, in chemistry, Univ. of 
Mass., 1962. 
Professional experience: 

Teaching Fellow, Middlebury College, 1933-35 

Instructor to Asst. Prof., Univ. of R. I., 
1935-46. 

Teaching Fellow, Univ. of Mass., 1946-47. 

Present position, 1947 to date. 
Membership in professional and honorary societies: 

Sigma Xi 

American Chemical Society 



27 



Subjects taught: 

Mineralogy 

Optical mineralogy 

Geochemistry 
Research interests: 

Geochemical methods 

Thomas E. Rice, Instructor: 
Training: 

B. S., Univ. of Mass., 1953. 
Professional experience: 

Production engineer, F. W. Sidles, Div. 
of General Instrument Corp., 1948-49; 
part-time, 1949-53. 

Part-time instructor, Univ. Mass., 1953. 

Present position, 1954 to date. 
Membership in professional organizations: 

American Geophysical Union 

Association of Coll, Geology Teachers 
Subjects taught: 

Physical geology 

Geophysics 

STAFF PUBLICATIONS AND REPORTS: 
H. T. U. Smith : 

Books and equivalent: 

Geological studies in southwestern Kansas: 

Kans. Geol. Surv. Bull. 34, 1940, 212 p. 
plus 30 pi. 

Aerial photographs and their applications: 

Appleton-Century-Crofts, New York, 1943, 
372 p. (now being completely revised). 

(with James Thorp and others) Pleistocene eolian 
deposits of the U. S., Alaska, and parts of 
Canada: wall map, in color, on scale of 
1:2,500,000; prepared under auspices of 
National Research Council and published by 
Geological Society of America, 1952, 

Contributions to standard reference works: 

Definitions of terms relating to eolian geology, 

in: Glossary of Geology and Related Sci., 

edited by J. V. Howell, Amer. Gol. Inst., 

Washington, D. C, 1957. 
The winds at work, in: The Book of Popular 

Science, the Grolier Society, N. Y., vol. 7, 

p. 2856-2864, 1958. 
Wind erosion and deposition, in: Encyclopedia 

Britannica, vol. 23, p. 649-652, 1960. 
Aerial photograph, in: McGraw-Hill Encyclopedia 

of Science and Technology, vol. 1, p. 82- 

84, 1960. 



28 



Articles on various geomorphic topics, in: The 
Grolier Encyclopedia (in press). 

Articles and reviews: 

(with Kirk Bryan and A. B. Cleaves) The present 
status of the Appalachian problem: Zeit. f. 
Geom., Bd, 7, 1932/33, 10 p. 

(with H. J. Fraser) Loess in the vicinity of 

Boston, Mass,; Amer. Jour. Sci,, vol. 30, 
1935, p. 16-32. 

Periglacial landslide topography of Canjilon 
Divide, Rio Arriba County, New Mexico: 
Jour. Geol., vol, 44, 1936, p. 836-860. 

Simplified graphic method of determining approx- 
imate axial angle from refractive indices 
of biaxial minerals-, Amer. Min,, vol. 22, 
1937, p. 675-681. 

Pleistocene ventifacts in western Kansas: Geol. 
Soc. Amer., Proc, for 1937, p. 114. 

Preliminary notes on Pleistocene gravels in 
southwestern Kansas: Trans. Kans. Acad. 
Sci., vol. 40, 1937, p. 283-291. 

Physiography of the lower Chama valley, New Mex- 
ico: Geol. Soc. Amer., Proc, for 1937, 
p. 315. 

Tertirary geology of the Abiquiu quadrangle, New 
Mexico: Jour. Geol., vol. 46, 1938, p. 933- 
965. 

(with J. H. Lane, Jr.) Graphic method of deter- 
mining optic sign and true axial angle from 
refractive indices of biaxial minerals: 
Amer. Min., vol. 23, 1938, p. 457-460. 

Geomorphic evidence relating to the antiquity of 
man in north-central Kansas: Geol. Soc. 
Amer., Bull., vol. 49, 1938, p. 1901. 

Sand dune cycle in western Kansas: Geol. Soc. 
Amer. Bull., vol. 50, 1939, p. 1934-1935. 

Mounting and remounting detrital mineral grains 
on slides: Amer. Min., vol. 24, 1939, p. 
602-604. 

Notes on historic changes in stream courses of 
western Kansas: Trans. Kans. Acad. Sci., 
vol. 43, 1940, p. 299-300. 

Preliminary report on a proposed Sand Dunes State 
Monument: Trans. Kans. Acad. Sci., vol. 43, 
1940, p. 307-308. 

Dune form and wind direction along southern shore 
of Lake Michigan: Geol. Soc. Amer. Bull., 
vol. 51, 1940, p. 1947. 

Review: "A tentative classification of sand 

dunes... 5i , by F. A. Melton: Jour. Geomorph., 
vol. 3, 1940, p. 359-361. 



29 



(with L. L. Ray) Southernmost glaciated peak in 

the U.S.: Science, vol. 93, 1941, p. 209; 

reprinted in Conservation, vol. 7, 1941, 

p. 45. 
Improved method of handling microfilm copy: 

Bull. Amer. Assoc. Petrol. Geol., vol. 25, 

1941, p. 2068-2070. 
Review: "Dunes of the western Navajo Country", 

by J. T. Hack: Jour. Geomorph., vol. 4, 

1941, p. 250-252. 
Aerial photographs in geomorphic studies: Jour. 

Geomorph., vol. 4, 1941, p. 171-205; re- 
printed in Photogram. Eng,, vol. 8, 1942, 

p. 129-155, and in "Manual of Photogram- 

metry", 1st ed., 1944, p. 728-748. 
(with J. C. Frye) Preliminary observations on 

pediment-like slopes in the central High 

Plains: Jour. Geomorph., vol. 5, 1942, 

p. 215-221. 
Sand dune stratification: Geol. Soc. Amer. Bull., 

vol. 54, 1942, p. 1852. 
Aids in teaching phot ogramme try: Photogram. Eng., 

vol. 9, 1943, p. 167-171; reprinted in 

''Manual of Photogrammetry" , 1st ed., N. Y., 

1944, p. 763-772. 
(with H. J. Peterson) The camera lucida as an 

aid in aerial photographic mapping: Mili- 
tary Eng., 1943, p. 410-411. 
Review: "The Physics of blown sand and desert 

dunes", by R. A. Bagnold: Geog. Rev., vol. 

33, 1943, p. 170-172, 
Notes on current literature: Photogram Eng., 

vol. 9, 1943, p. 160, 213. 
Erosional modification of landmarks in western 

Kansas during historic time: Univ. Kans. 

Sci. Bull., vol. 30, 1944, p. 3-13. 
(with Althea Page Smith) Periglacial rock streams 

in the Blue Ridge area: Geol. Soc. Amer. 

Bull., vol. 56, 1945, p. 1198. 
Notes on recent literature: Photogram. Eng., 

vol. 11, 1945, p. 312-313. 
A graphic method of measuring vertical angles 

from oblique photos: Photogram Eng., vol. 

12, 1946, p. 147-150. 
Sand dunes: Trans. N. Y. Acad. Sci., vol. 8 

(ser. II), 1946, p. 197-199. 
Drainage evolution in the Central High Plains: 

Geol. Soc. Amer. Bull., vol. 57, 1946, p. 

1232. 
Notes on recent literature: Photogram. Eng., 

vol. 12, 1946, p. 246. 
Aerial photos in geologic training: Geol. Soc. 

Amer. Inter. Proc, Mar., 1947, p. 2-7. 



30 



Photogrammetry and photogeology at the Univ. of 
Kansas: Photogram, Eng., vol. 13, 1947, 
p. 367-368, 627. 

Wind erosion in soft rock: Geol. Soc. Amer. 
Bull., vol. 58, 1947, p. 1229. 

(editor) Symposium of information relative to 
uses of aerial photography of geologists: 
Photogram. Eng., vol. 13, 1947, p. 531-628. 

Giant glacial grooves in northwest Canada: Amer, 
Jour. Sci., vol. 13, 1948, p. 503-514. 

Reviews of books and papers: Photogram. Eng., 
vol. 14, 1948, p. 608-611. 

Periglacial features in the Driftless Area of 
Southern Wisconsin: Jour. Geol., vol. 57, 
1949, p. 196-215. 

Physical effects of pleistocene climatic changes 
in non-glaciated areas - eolian phenomena, 
frost action, and stream terracing: Geol. 
Soc. Amer. Bull., vol. 60, 1949, p. 1485- 
1515. 

Discussion - trends and needs in photogeology 
and photo interpretation: Photogram. Eng., 
vol, 15, 1949, p. 567-569, 575-576. 

Dune forms in western Nebraska: Geol. Soc. Amer. 
Bull., vol. 60, 1949, p. 1920. 

Progress and problems in photogeology: Photo- 
gram. Eng., vol. 16, 1950, p. 111-118. 

Cryopedologic phenomena in the Beartooth Moun- 
tains, Wyoming-Montana: Bull. Geol. Soc. 
Amer., vol. 61, 1951, p. 1503. 

Notes on recent literature relating to photo- 
geology: Photogram. Eng., vol. 16, 1950, 
p. 781-783. 

(with H. W. Wanless and others) Outstanding 

aerial photographs in North America: Arner. 
Geol. Inst, Rept. No. 5, 1951, 87 p. 

Rock glaciers in the Norman Wells area, NWT, 
Canada: Geol. Soc. Arner. Bull., vol. 62, 

1951, p. 1480, 

Review: I( Studies in photogeology in connection 
with geologic mapping in Switzerland 1 ' , by 
R. Helbling: Geog. Rev., vol. 41, 1951, 
p. 352-353. 

Review: "Handbook of aerial mapping and photo- 
grammetry Si , by L. G. Trorey: Jour. Geol., 
vol. 59, 1951, p. 410. 

Notes on recent literature: Photogram. Eng., 
vol. 17, 1951, p. 184-136. 

(editor) Symposium on air photos in geography and 
soil science: Photogram, Eng., vol. 17, 1951, 
p. 715-779. 

Air photos in geology: Tulsa Geol. Soc. Digest, 
vol* 20, 1952, p. 47-48, 

The Kirk Bryan Memorial Award: Science, vol. 116, 

1952, p. 400. 



31 



Photo- interpretation in applied earth science: 
Photogram. Eng., vol. 18, 1952, p. 418-428. 

Photo- interpretation in relation to geologic 
research: Photogram Eng., vol. 19, 1953, 
p. 108-111. 

Present status of photo- interpretation in earth 
science (report of International Photogram- 
metry Congress, Comm. VII, phase 2); Photo- 
gram. Eng., vol. 19, 1953, p. 137-143. 

Photo interpretation of terrain: in " Selected 
papers on photogeology and photo interpreta- 
tion presented at meetings sponsored by the 
Committee on Geophysics and Geography, 
Research & Development Boards, U. S. Defense 
Dept., Ti Washington, D. C, 1953, p. 7-53. 

The Hickory Run boulder field, Carbon County, 
Pennsylvania: Amer. Jour. Sci., vol. 251, 
1953, p. 625-642. 

Periglacial frost wedging in the "rock cities" 
of southwestern New York: Bull. Geol. Soc. 
Amer., vol. 64, 1953, p. 1474. 

Notes on recent literature relating to photo 
interpretation: Photogram. Eng., vol. 14, 

1953, p. 675-678. 

Analysis of dune areas for geographical purposes: 
Ann. Amer. Assoc. Geog., vol. 44, 1954, 
p. 281-282. 

Costal dunes: Coastal Geography Symposium, 

Office of Naval Research, Washington, D. C, 

1954, p. 51-56. 

Classification of sand dunes: 19th Internat. 
Geol. Cong., Compt. Rend., Sec. VII, Fasc. 
VII, Alger, 1954, p. 103. 

Eolian sand on desert mountains: Bull. Geol. Soc. 
Amer., vol. 65, 1954, p. 1306-1307. 

Aerial photographs in Quaternary research: 

Quaternaria (Rome, Italy), vol. 1, 1954, 
p. 81-96. 

Geomorphic evidence of recent climatic fluc- 
tuations in the Peruvian coastal desert: 
Science, vol. 122, 1955, p. 418-419. 

Use of aerial photographs for interpretation of 
dune history in Nebraska, U. S. A.: Actes 
du IV Cong. Assoc. Internat, pour l f Etude 
du Quat., Rome, Italy, 1955, 7 p. 

Deflation basin in the Sechura desert of north- 
ern Peru: Bull. Geol. Soc. Amer,, vol. 66, 

1955, p. 1618. 

(with J. Harlen Bretz and G. E. Neff) Channeled 
seabland of Washington - new data and inter- 
pretations: Bull. Geol. Soc. Amer., vol. 
67, 1956, p. 957-1049. 

Giant composite barchans of the northern Peru- 
vian deserts: Bull. Geol. Soc. Amer., vol. 
67, 1956, p. 1735. 



32 



Sand dunes of the Peruvian coastal desert: 

Abstract published in Resume de los Trabajos 
Presentados, XX Internat. Geol. Cong., 
Mexico, 1956; manuscript in press in pro- 
ceedings of the Congress. 

Review: Playf air's "Illustrations of the Hutton- 
ian Theory of the Earth' 1 (reprinted by Univ. 
of 111. Press): Jour. Sed. Petrol., vol. 
27, 1957, p. 351-352. 

Report of the photo- interpretation committee,* 
American Society of Photogrammetry: Photo- 
gram. Eng., vol. 25, 1959, p. 307-308. 

(with Curtis Messinger) Sand dunes and shoreline 
history in the Provincetown area, Cape Cod, 
Mass.: Bull. Geol. Soc. Amer., vol. 70, 
1959, p. 1677. 

Review: ,: Coastal Sand Dunes of Oregon and Wash- 
ington", by W. S. Cooper: Geog, Rev., vol. 
50, 1960, p. 113-115. 

Classification of coastal dunes: XIX Int. Geog. 
Cong., Abstracts of papers, Stockholm, 
Sweden, 1960, p. 268-269. 

Periglacial frost features and related phenomena 
in the U. S.: in press, Biuletyn Pery- 
glacjalny (Lodz, Poland), 20 MS pages. 

Reports of limited distribution: 

Geology of the lower Hanna River area, NWT, 
Canada (submitted to Imperial Oil Ltd., 
1943, as a part of geological investigations 
on the Canal Project): on file in U. S. 
Geological Survey library, Washington, D. C. 

(with other members of the Military Geology Unit, 
U. S. Geological Survey) various Strategic 
Engineering Studies, published by Army Map 
Service, 1944-46, for restricted distribu- 
tion within the Armed Forces. 

Photo- interpretation studies in the Sand Hills of 
western Nebraska: Final report on Naval 
Research Contract N9onr 86800, 49 p., plus 
38 fig. and 7 pi. (mimeographed), Lawrence, 
Kansas, 1951. 

(with Curtis Messinger) Geomorphic studies of the 
Provincetown dunes, Cape Cod, Mass.: Tech. 
Rept. No. 1, Naval Research Contract Nonr- 
2242(00), 62 p., plus 12 fig. and 6 pi. 
(mimeographed), Amherst, Mass., 1959. 

Physiography and photo interpretation of coastal 
sand dunes: Final report on Naval Research 
Contract Nonr- 2242(00), 26 p. (mimeographed), 
Amherst, Mass., 1960. 



33 



Oswald C. Farquhar : 

Atticles and reviews: 

Green Mountain [re the geology and natural his- 
tory of Ascension Island, South Atlantic]: 
Jour. Cairngorm Club., Scotland, 1950, 9p. 

(with H. H. Read) The geology of the Arnage dis- 
trict, Aberdeenshire, a re interpretation: 
Quart. Jour. Geol. Soc. London, vol. 107, 
1951, p. 423-440. 

The Taita Hills, Kenya: Arbor., 1952, 6 p. 

From dolerite to diorite - older granite activ- 
ity near Ellon, Aberdeenshire: Geol. Mag., 
vol. 90, 1953, p. 393-403. 

Mineral occurrences in east Africa; Brit. Assoc. 
Adv. Sci., Liverpool, 1953, 1 p. 

(with H. H. Read) The Buchan anticline of Dalra- 
dian rocks (the Banff nappe) in north-east 
Scotland: Quart. Jour. Geol. Soc. London, 
vol. 112, 1956, p. 131-158. 

The Precambrian rocks of Kansas: Kans. St. Geol. 
Surv. Bull. 127, 1957, p. 49-122. 

Two reported meteorite finds in Kansas: Trans. 
Kans. Acad. Sci., vol. 60, 1957, p. 252-258. 

Silica bands and serpent inite in the Taita Hills, 
Kenya: Geol. Soc. Amer. Bull., vol. 69, 
1958, p. 1652. 

Occurrence and origin of the hourglass structure: 
Internat. Geol. Cong., 21st session, Report, 
Pt. XXI, Copenhagen, Denmark, 1960, p. 194- 
200. 

Geology and asbestos deposits of the Taita Hills, 
Kenya: Kenya Geol. Surv. Mem. 2, 1960, 
110 p. 

The Geologists' Association of Great Britain: 
Geotimes, vol. 5, 1961, p/ 12-13, 34-35. 

Reviews of various educational films in: Geo- 
times. 

Unpublished reports: 

Various reports at Command and Wing levels on 

operations, communications, and administra- 
tion: Royal Air Force Transport Command, 
1941-45, 

Soils in the Rhineland with reference to their 
bearing capacity: War Dept., London, 1950. 

Anthophyllite asbestos near Mtito Andei, Kenya: 
Gov't of Kenya, 1953, 11 p. 

Soils of Carinthia, Austria: Joint Intell. Bur., 
London, 1953. 

Wells reaching the Precambrian surface in Kansas: 
Kans. St. Geol. Surv., 1957, 162 p. 



34 



Uraniurn occurrences in the Blind River district, 
Ontario: Kennecott Copper Corp., 1957, 
39 p. 28 fig. and pi. 

Contribution to "Paleomagnetism of the younger 
gabbros of Aberdeenshire and its bearing on 
their deformation, u by D. J. Blundell and 
H. H. Read, in: Proc. Geol. Assoc, vol. 
69, 1958. 

Geological and economic report on proposed routes 
for water-pipeline tunnel through East Moun- 
tain, Holyoke, Mass.,: Holyoke Water Bd., 
1958, 63 p. 

Geological survey of Birchy Lake concession, 

Newfoundland: Canadian Johns -manville Co., 
1960, 42 p., 13 figs,, 28 pi., 26 maps. 



Ward S. Motts: 



Published works: 

The occurrence and movement of groundwater in 

part of the Capitan reef complex, southeast- 
ern New Mexico: Geol. Soc. Amer. Bull., 
vol. 69, 1953, p. 1738. 

Caliche genesis and rainfall in the Pecos valley 
area of southeastern New Mexico: Geol. Soc, 
Amer. Bull., vol. 69, 1958, p. 1737. 

Geomorphology of the east side of the Sacramento 
Mountains: Guidebook for Joint Field Conf., 
Permian Basin Section, Soc, Econ. Paleont. 
and Min., and Roswell Geol. Soc, 1959, 
p. 223-233. 

Age of the Carlsbad Caverns and related caverns 
in rocks of Guadalupe age west of the Pecos 
River, N. M.: Geol. Soc Amer. Bull., vol. 
70, 1959, p. 1737. 

Use of the recharge characteristics for quantita- 
tive analysis in geomorphology: Geol. Soc 
Amer. Bull., vol. 70, 1959, p. 1808. 

Relation of structure and geomorphology to occur- 
rence of ground water on the east slope of 
the Sacramento Mountains, N. M.: Program SW 
Regional Mtg., Amer. Assoc. Petrol. Geol., 
Lubbock, Tex., 1959, p. 22. 

(with R. A. Gaal) Geology of the Pajarito Moun- 
tain area, Otero County, N. M.: Amer. Assoc 
Petrol. Geol. Bull., vol. 44, 1960, p. 103- 
110. 

Geology of the West Carlsbad quadrangle, N. M. 
(map with accompanying text), U. S. Geol. 
Survey, 1961. 



35 



Open- file and other reports: 

Contributor to: R. L. Gamer, Geology of the Red 
Bluff diversion dam, Sacramento Canals Unit: 
U. S. Bur. Reel., Sacramento Valley Dis- 
trict, Region 2, 61 p., 1953. 

Contributor to: Red Bluff diversion site seepage 
investigation: U. S. Bur. Reel., Region 2, 
20 p., 1953. 

Contributor to: Geology and ground-water studies 
of the Tehama-Colusa Canal Service area, U. 
S. Bur. Reel., Region 2, 1954. 

(with L. J. Bjorklund) Geology and water resources 
of the Carlsbad area, N. M.: N. M. St. Eng. 
open-file report, 322 p., 1959 (to be pub- 
lished as a U. S. Geol. Surv. Water Supply 
Paper). 

(with R. A. Gaal) Investigation of a well site 

in Lincoln National Forest, Otero 

County, N. M.: U. S. Geol. Survey, Ground- 
water Branch, 1958, 16 p. 

Recharge study of the Roswell basin, N. M.: U.S. 
Geol, Surv., Ground- water branch, 1960, 
257 p. 

(with G. A. Dinwiddie) Availability of irrigation 
supplies for the Acoma and Laguna Indian 
Reservations, N. M.: U. S. Geol. Surv., 
1960, 50 p. 

(with G. A. Dinwiddie) Availability of water for 
Pueblo supplies, Laguna Indian Reservation, 
N. M.: U. S. Geol. Surv., 1960,40 p. (to be 
combined with the above and published as a 
Water Supply Paper). 

Manuscripts in preparation: 

Mechanics of solution in evaporites of the Pecos 

Valley, N. M. 
Relation of ground-water movement to lithofacies 

in rocks of the Guadalupian series. 
Geomorphic evolution of southeastern New Mexico. 

George £. McGill : 

(with H. D. Holland, R. B. Curtiss, and J. A. Peterson) 
The use of leachable uranium in geochemical pros- 
pecting on the Colorado Plateau : Econ . Geol . , 

vol. 52, 1957, p. 546-569. 

Structure of the northwest flank of the Flint Creek 

Range, Granite County, western Mont.: Geol. Soc. 
Amer. Bull., vol. 69, 1958, p. 1612. 

Geology of the northwest flank of the Flint Creek 
Range, western Mont,: University Microfilms, 
Ann Arbor, Mich., 1958. 



36 



Geologic map of the northwest flank of the Flint 
Creek Range, western Mont., with accompanying 
text: Mont. Bur. Mines & Geol., Geol. Investig. 
Map No. 3, 1959. 

Gregory W. Webb : 

(with L. F. Hintze) Ordovician stratigraphy from cen- 
tral Utah to central Nevada: Geol. Soc. Amer. 
Bull., vol. 61, 1950, p. 1524. 

Middle Ordivician detailed stratigraphic sections for 
western Utah and eastern Nevada: Utah Geol. 
and Min. Surv. Bull. 57, 1956, 77 p. 

Palinspastic maps of south-central Calif, and a newly 
discovered segment of the San Andreas rift: 
Geol. Soc. Amer. Bull., vol. 68, 1957, p. 1310. 

Middle Ordovician stratigraphy in eastern Nevada and 
western Utah: Bull. Amer. Assoc. Petrol. Geol., 
vol. 42, 1958, p. 2335-2377. 

PRESENT GRADUATE PROGRAM (leading to the Master's Degree): 

Courses offered : 

Courses open to graduate students only: 

200. Special problems (research or independent 

study) 

201. Optical mineralogy 
203. Igneous petrology 

205. Sedimentary petrology 

206. Metamorphic petrology 

212. Sedimentation 

213. Geophysics. 

214. Petroleum geology 

216. Metalliferous economic geology 

217. Non-metalliferous economic geology 

218. Ground-water geology 

220. Stratigraphic paleontology 

221. Animal micropaleontology 
228. Map interpretation 

230. Advanced geomorphology 

234. Regional geology of North America 

235. Appalachian geology 

236. Advanced structural geology 
238. Advanced photogeology 

241 . Seminar 

250 . Geochemistry 

300. Master's thesis 
Courses open to graduate and undergraduate students: 

178. Principles of stratigraphy 

189 . Geomorphology 

191 . Photogeology 

194. Pleistocene geology 
Courses in other dept# available for graduate credit: 

Agronomy 157. Soil formation 



37 



Geology 55 (Amherst College). Vertebrate paleon- 
tology 
Botany 130, Plant ecology 
Botany 190. Palynology 
Chemistry 165, 166. Physical chemistry 
Chemistry 184, Radiochemistry 
Chemistry 186. Theoretical inorganic chemistry 
Chemistry 187. Inorganic chemistry of the common 

elements 
Civil Engineering 180. Soil mechamics 
Entomology 212. Geographical distribution of 

plants and animals 
Zoology 153. Principles of genetics 
Xoology 170. Invertebrate zoology 
Zoology 174, Limnology 

Lecture Program ; Course work is supplemented by a lecture 
program carried out in cooperation with the other 
three colleges in the valley. Distinguished geologists, 
both American and European, are brought to the campus 
to present recent advances in special fields, and to 
participate in informal discussions with staff and 
graduate students. During the past year, the following 
were included in the program: 

Prof. Fred A. Donath, Columbia University 
Prof. John C. Maxwell, Princeton University 
Dr. L. L. Nettle ton, Gravity Meter Exploration Co. 
Mr. Timothy J. Hunt, Loomis-Sayles & Co. 
Dr. W. V. Lewis, Cambridge University (England) 
Prof. George Kiersch, Cornell University 
Prof. Bruce C. Heezen, Lamont Geophysical Obser- 
vatory, Columbia University. 

Field Program : Classroom and laboratory instruction are 

complemented by an extensive program of field trips to 
places of geologic significance in the northeastern 
U. S. During the summer, students are encouraged to 
engage in field geology, and it is required that Mas- 
ter's theses be based at least in part on field 
studies . 

Departmental requirements for the M . S . degree (in addition 
to general requirements of the Graduate School): 

1. A placement examination for new graduate students. 

2. A minimum of 60 credits in geology, including both 

undergraduate and graduate courses. 

3. Basic courses in mathematics, physics, chemistry, 

and biologic science. 

4. At least 6 weeks of training in field geology. 

5. A thesis based at least in part on field studies, 

and representing an original contribution to 
geologic knowledge. 

6. A qualifying examination covering all basic fields 

of geology, taken at least one semester before 
the expected completion date of the thesis. 



38 



Theses Submitted and degrees awarded (in chronologic 

order; chairman or thesis committee noted 
in parentheses): 

Henry S. Saulnier, The Paleopalynology of the Fort 

Union Coals of Red Lodge, Montana, 1950 (Wilson). 
Herbert T. Ames, Plant Microfossils in a Colorado 

Cretaceous Coal, 1951 (Wilson). 
Raymond Malloy, Carboniferous Plant Spores of the No. 

40 Brine Seam, Joggins, Nova Scotai, 1951 

(Wilson). 
Nestor Nicholeris, A Plant Microfossil Investigation 

of Three Nova Scotian Coal Seams, 1951 (Wilson). 
William F. Berry, A Descriptive Study of Crinoid 

Columnals from the Hamilton Group of New York, 

1952 (Wilson). 

Robert A. Rotan, Jr., Organic Residue Study of Lower 

Paleozoic Rocks, 1952 (Wilson). 
Wallace Waloweek, Plant Microfossil Studies of Three 

Coal Seams Near Joggins, Nova Scotia, 1952 

(Wilson). 
Alan C. Donaldson, A Micropaleontological Study of 

the Vicksburge Formation from Five Texas Wells, 

1953 (Wilson). 

Russell R, Dutcher, Certain Tectonic & Petrographic 

Relationships of the Ashley Falls, Mass. & Conn. 

Quadrangle, 1953 (M. Light). 
James F. Shea, Jr., Geology of the Ware Quadrangle, 

Massachusetts, 1953 (M. Light). 
Arthur Le Blanc, A Microfossil Study of Brackish and 

Marine Sediments near Rockport, Texas, 1954, 

(Wilson). 
John Fisher, The Hystrichosphaerids in the Clinton 

Group (Silurian) of New York State, 1955 (Wilson). 
Cynthia W. Percy, A Petrographic and Field Study of 

the Belchertown Tonal ite, 1955 (Nelson). 
Nelson J. Sarris, Contributions to the Stratigraphy 

and Lithology of the Trias sic Sedimentary rocks 

in the Conn. Valley of Massachusetts, 1955 .. , 

(Wilson) . 
Norman K. Erickson, Hystrichosphaerids of the Devonian 

Onondaga Formation, Welland County, Ontario, 

Canada, 1956 (Wilson). 
Robert B. Hulsman, The Hystrichosphaerids of the 

Onondaga Formation Devonian of Eastern New York, 

1956 (Wilson). 
Eugene J. Tynan, Silicoflagellates of the Calvert For- 
mation (Miocene) of Maryland, 1956 (Wilson). 
Curtis Messinger, A Geomorphic study of the Dunes of 

the Provincetown Peninsula, Cape Cod, Massachusetts , 

1958 (Smith). 
Allen E. Andersen, Jr., Bedrock Geology of part of the 

Goshen Quadrangle, Massachusetts, 1959 (Farquhar). 
Donald A. Parks, Heavy Mineral Analysis of the Creta- 
ceous Red Bank Formation of New Jersey, 1959 

(Webb) . 



i 









39 



Andre R. Tetreault, Bedrock Geology of the western 

half of the Westhampton Quadrangle, Massachusetts, 

1959 (McGill). 
Peter C. Bazakas, The Bedrock Geology of Easthampton 

Quadrangle, Massachusetts, 1960 (Farquhar). 
Lawrence P. Beer, Geology of the Thompson Lakes NW 

15 -Minute Quadrangle, Northwest Montana, 1960 

(McGill). 
Bruce H. DeWyk, Bedrock Geology of the northern half 

of the Southbury Quadrangle, Connecticut, 1960 

(Farquhar). 
Kim Fitzgerald, Bedrock Geology of the western half of 

the Royalston Quadrangle, Massachusetts, 1960 

(McGill). 
Charles I. Frye, Glacial and Post-glacial Erosion of 

Franconia Notch, New Hampshire, 1960 (Smith). 
James L. Ruhle, The Mt. Laurel- Wenonah Formation of 

New Jersey, 1960 (Farquhar). 
Raymond Pestrong, Bedrock Geology of the southern half 

of the East Lee Quadrangle, Massachusetts, 1961 

( Farquhar) . 

Financial aid to students : 

Academic year: during the academic year, graduate 

students have been aided by Teaching Fellowships, 
Departmental Fellowships, Teaching Associate- 
ships, and by an Office of Naval Research con- 
tract . 
Summer: summer field work has been aided by: 
Sigma Xi grants 
Montana Bureau of Mines 
Office of Naval Research contract 
National Science Foundation grant available to 
aid qualified parsons. 

Enrollment and applications : The number of graduate stu- 
dents enrolled increased from 3 in Sept., 1956, to 11 
in Sept., 1960 j 13 are expected in Sept. of this year. 
Along with the increase in numbers has been a marked 
broadening of academic and geographic distribution, 
with students drawn from such well-known colleges as 
Dartmouth, Brown, Harvard, and Amherst. The number of 
students applying for admission was roughly double the 
number of those accepted. 

Placement of students : 

Of the 11 students who have received the M. S. degree 
since 1957, placement has been as follows: 

Junior College teaching - 1 

State geological survey work - 1 

Petroleum exploration - 1 

Fellowships for doctorate studies - 3 (at Stan- 
ford, University of California at Los Ange- 
les, and University of North Dakota) 

Mining geology - 2 (a third was offered a posi- 
tion, but declined) 



40 



Ground-water geology - 1 

Business - 2 
One student who expects to complete work for the 

degree during the present summer has received a 

Fellowship at the University of Texas. 
Other students who did not complete requirements for 

the degree have received positions in secondary 

school teaching (both private and public), and 

with the U. S. Corps of Engineers. 



PLANNED IMPROVEMENT OF RESOURCES FOR GRADUATE TRAINING: 

Space ; 

""Completion of Section 3 of Morrill Hall, scheduled 

for the latter part of this year, will pro- 
vide approximately 3100 square feet of 
additional floor space, including the follow- 
ing: 

Experimental laboratory for high-pressure and 
other types of work 

Rock preparation room 

Storage rooms 

Enlargement of Sedimentation laboratory, with 
provision for an experimental stream table. 

Cold room for low- temperature experiments (one of 
about 3 in the U. S. associated with a 
geology department) 

Office space for two persons. 
Completion of Section 4 of Morrill Hall, sceduled for 
about 1964, will provide a further addition 
of roughly 16,000 square feet of floor space, 
including the following: 

Geochemistry laboratory 

Advanced mineralogy laboratory 

General-purpose laboratory 

Classroom 

Gamma-ray radiation laboratory 

Se?lsmograph station 

Photogeology laboratory (probably the largest and 
best equipped in any geology department of 
the U. S.) 

Seminar room 

Museum room 

Space for experimental work and other types of 
research 

Storage rooms 

Office space for 22 graduate students and 4 fac- 
ulty members 

Equipment : Equipment lists for the above space include the 

following: 
Gravity meter 

Stream table, 47 x .7 ft. in size, probably one of the 
largest for any geology dept. in the U. S. 



4i 



Portable seismic equipraent 

Milling and grinding machines 

Two-circle goniometer 

Infra-red spectrophotometer 

Standard spectrophotometer 

Muffle furnace and quenching furnace 

Radiocobalt irradiation unit 

Monochromator 

Ultra-violet mineral testing unit 

Scintillatron 

Density balance 

Beckman pH meter 

Universal stages 

Emission spectrograph 

Viscometer 

Centrifuges 

X-ray equipment 

Dilatometer 

Calculating machines 

Photogrammetric equipment 

Photographic equipment 

Special equipment for petrographic microscopes 

Electronic recording unit. 

Collections ; Additions to mineralogical, petrol ogic, and 
paleontologic collections are made every year both by 
purchase and through the field work of staff members. 
Particular emphasis is being placed on the collections 
of maps and air photos; the latter is already the best 
in the New England area, and it is hoped that the 
former may become so; the Army Map Service collection 
of world maps is one addition now being made. 

Library : A continuing program of acquisitions should pro- 
vide the basic reference materials for nearly all 
fields of geology, together with more extensive mater- 
ial for the specialized fields which the department is 
particularly qualified to pursue. 

Staff: The following additions to staff have been requested: 

1962 - Assistant Professor, marine geology) fields tenta- 

1963 - Asst. or Assoc. Prof., geophysics (tive; contin- 
1954 - Asst. or Assoc. Prof., petrology )gent on avail. 

1964 - Visiting professor in field to be designated 

from year to year; to be a distinguished 
scientist from Europe or elsewhere. 



42 

PROPOSED DOCTORATE PROGRAM : 

FIELDS OF SPECIALIZATION: 

At the start, it is planned that doctorate thesis projects 
be limited to the following combinations of 
fields : 

Ground-water and economic geology 

Structural and regional geology 

Geomorphology - Cenozoic geology - photogeology 

As staff is enlarged, other fields would be added; marine 
geology would be given preferential consideration. 

SPECIAL DEPARTMENTAL REQUIREMENTS: 

1. A minimum of 6 months of field training and experience. 

2. Strong foundation in related sciences, particularly 

physics, chemistry, mathematics, and biological 
sciences. These, together with engineering, would be 
recommended for the minor. 

3. A basic knowledge of all main fields of geology, ranked, 

however, in an order of decreasing emphasis elected 
by the individual candidate. 

COURSES OFFERED: existing courses, as listed on preceding pages, 
are essentially adequate as a basis for doctorate 
training; addition of the following new courses, how- 
ever, would provide improved balance and strengthen 
special fields; approval of these courses is hereby 
requested: 

202. Advanced mineralogy. Physical and chemical character- 
istics of minerals and methods of laboratory investi- 
gation, including X-ray, differential thermal analysis, 
and microchemical techniques. Prerequisite, course 
201 and permission of instructors. 
3 credits. The staff. 

225. Cenozoic stratigraphy. Occurrence, correlation, and 
origin of marine and terrestrial Cenozoic deposits, 
and their relation to paleogeographic and tectonic 
conditions; emphasis is on North America. Prerequi- 
sites, 178 and 189. 
3 credits. Mr. Webb. 

227. Marine Geology. Physical characteristics and geological 
processes of the ocean basins and margins, and their 
bearing on interpretation of geologic history. Prere- 
quisites, 178 and 194. 
3 credits. Mr. Webb. 



43 

232. Physiography of North America. A survey of the physio- 
graphic provinces of North America and their evolution, 
with emphasis on problems and methods of approach. 
Prerequisite, 139. 
3 credits. Mr. Motts. 

245. Evolution of geologic concepts, Perspective on current 
geological thinking in the light of its historical 
background; particular attention to controversial ques- 
tions and to the rise and decline of ruling theories. 
Prerequisite, one year of graduate study. 
2 Credits. Mr. Motts. (required of all doctoral candi- 
dates ) . 

400. Thesis, Ph.D. degree. 
30 credits. 

It is planned that the above courses would be given in 
alternate years or on request. 

POSSIBLE PARTICIPATION BY OTHER INSTITUTIONS: 

Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. Informal cooperation 
with this organization has been carried on already in 
connection with Master's thesis projects. Interest 
has been expressed in a more formal program of cooper- 
ative research and graduate training, including the 
possibility of joint appointments. 

U. S. Geological Survey. It is anticipated that personnel 
of this organization may be stationed here in the 
future, and be available to participate in advanced 
seminars and advise on thesis projects concerned with 
the geology of this region. 

ANTICIPATED ENROLLMENT: Inquiries and applications received 

during the past few years suggest the following minimum en- 
rollment: 

1961-62 - 1 

1962-63 - 3 

1963-64 - 4 or 5 

PROBABLE SOURCES OF FINANCIAL AID: 

University Teaching and Departmental Fellowships and Teach- 
ing Associateships, which are expected to increase in 
number as undergraduate enrollment expands. 

National Defense Education Act Fellowships, to be applied 
for as soon as program is approved. 

National Science Foundation Graduate Fellowships and Coop- 
erative Fellowships. 

Oil Co. Fellowships, to be solicited as soon as program is 
approved . 



44 



National Science Foundation research grants: an invitation 
has been received to submit a proposal for a long- 
range photogeologic study of ice- free areas in Antarc- 
tica; this could be undertaken only with the help of 
doctorate students, and could subsidize many such 
students for an extended period of time. 

Cambridge Air Force Research Center: this organization 
has expressed strong interest in a research contract 
proposal which would take advantage of certain of our 
special facilities, and which could subsidize one or 
more doctorate candidates. 

EXPECTED PLACEMENT OF STUDENTS RECEIVING THE DEGREE: 

State and federal geological surveys 

Petroleum, mining, and construction industries 

Federal and other research institutes 

College and university teaching: the numerous requests 

already received for applicants to fill positions re- 
quiring the doctorate degree suggest that this would 
be a major area of placement. 



PROPOSLD CURRICULA FOR THE 
NEW SCHOOL OF HOME ECONOMICS 

DECEMBER, 1961 



Contents: Page 

1. Present Developmental Status 1 

2. Historical Implication 3 

3. Summary of Changes 4 

4. Proposed Curricula 5 
(including four-year plans) 

5. Recommended New Courses 21 



Marion A, Niederpruem, Dean 
School of Home Economics 



-1 

PRESENT DEVELOPMENTAL STATUS 

The reorganization of the School of Home Economics and the proposed 
revision of its curricula have been under consideration by the staff for 
several years. After much preliminary discussion, an ad hoc committee 
was appointed in October of 1958 to study the internal administrative and 
academic situation. This was a school committee. A preliminary report 
submitted to the University Administration resulted in approval and encourage- 
ment to pursue the investigation and revision. Subsequent sub-committees 
of the staff, and the joint staff (research, extension and resident) as 
a united body meticulously analyzed the philosophy, objectives, offerings, 
promotion, and campus and public image of the school. This self examination 
convinced us of the urgency of making - not infinitesimal changes in a random 
manner but - the preparation of a revised program based on a new philosophy 
and objectives which are realistic in today's society including a vision 
which projects into the future. 

During the period of the above investigation, the school was faced 
with a change in administration. Plans continued to formulate during the 
period of time taken to seek a new, dynamic and progressive administrator 
who could and would share with us the challenge and vision of an entirely 
New School of Home Economics. 

The search was successfully culminated in June of 1961 and plans were 
actively resumed in September when our present Dean assumed office. An 
extensive, critical analysis was made of all courses, prerequisites, lecture- 
laboratory-discussion balance of the structure of all classes. Careful 
consideration was given to delete all obsolete materials and superfluous 
details; a concerted effort was made to up-grade, up-date and increase 
the depth and academic quality of existing courses. New courses were designed 
to meet the professional needs of specialized areas. The academic caliber 
of the recommendations and the relationship of the entire program to the 
total University community was studied. Conferences were held with leaders 
of professional and business organizations, administrators and staff members 
of University of Massachusetts and other colleges and universities which 
led to the crystalization of the resulting proposed program. (See attached 
list of some individuals consulted. ) 

This new program is not skill oriented. It applies the principles 
and concepts of fundamental Arts and Sciences of liberal education to permit 
the depth in areas of specialization which will produce professionally 
competent graduates of the school. 

These curricula, providing a minimum of sixty credits of liberal education 
conforms to the university requirements for a B.S. degree, and includes a 
School of Home Economics core of nine credit hours, a core for each major 
area and a range from 120 to 128 credit hours for graduation. 

The five major curricula offered are unique to Home Economics, They are Dietetic 
and Institutional Administration, Food and Nutrition in Business, Fashion in Retail- 
ing and Business, Secondary Education and Extension and Nursery School Education. 
These are found under the specialized areas of Food and Nutrition, (FN); Textiles, 
Clothing and Related Arts, (TCRA); and Home Economics Education, (HEEd, ). The 
subject matter areas of Management and Family Economics, (MFE ) and Human Develop- 
ment, (HD) are supportive to the majors. The letters in parenthesis are 
area codes. Prerequisites of appropriate arts aod science courses allow 



-2 

for application of fundamental knowledge to the content of courses in 
specialized areas. Course content is based on research in Home Economics 
as well as in the physical and biological sciences, social sciences, arts 
and humanities. 

Professional Home Economists are college and university graduates with 
bachelors degrees in Home Economics, They serve individuals, families and 
communities through schools and colleges, extension programs, business 
organizations of many kinds all over the world, community and government 
organizations and agencies, newspapers, magazines, radio and television. 
Representative types of activities that Home Economists participate in 
include teaching, research, writing, dietetics, extension work, interior 
decoration, fashion merchandising, food consulting, food service management 
and product development. 

The School of Home Economics integrates research, extension and resident 
staffs. To facilitate the transitional period of this proposed program, the 
services of some exceptionally qualified extension specialists will be 
available on a part-time basis. The conversion of this program is planned 
on a graduated scale over a three-year period. It is recognized that this 
revision is experimental and will be revised periodically to meet changing 
needs . 

It is with a feeling of internal unanimity that the School of Home 
Economics makes this presentation--the staff has cast a unanimous vote of 
approval, acceptance and support of the philosophy, objectives and curricula 
of the New School of Home Economics. 

In consideration of the program with its interdisciplinary factors, 
its professional requirements and opportunities and the desire to insure 
the graduate of a broad general education with adequate professional compe- 
tencies* many qualified individuals were consulted including: President 
Lederle, Provost Woodside, Deans; Hunsburger, Kirshen, Maher, Purvis, 
Spielman, ; Professors; J. Blackmore, E. Buck, L. Davis, G, D. DiMaggio, 
R, Drew-Bear, T. Fox, P. Gamble, M. Goldberg, D. Hankinson, H, Hardy, 
C. King, H. Korson, M. Macdonald, C. Neet, P. Norton, W. Randall, R. T. Smith, 
G, Snyder. 

Executives and personnel of various professional and business 
organizations provided helpful suggestions, some of these representative 
groups were; National Home Economics Association, Home Economists in Business, 
Deans of Home Economics in Land Grant Universities, National Retail Merchants 
Association, Food Industry, Textile and Clothing Industry, Educational 
Directors of Secondary and Nursery Schools, leaders of various types of 
Food Services. 



-3 

HISTORICAL IMPLICATION 

Home Economics is one of the important branches of the land-grant 
system of higher education and is responsible for three services: resident 
instruction, research and extension. As early as 1388, Dr. W. 0. Atwater, 
first director of the Office of Experiment Stations pressed for support for 
nutrition research. Congress in 1394 voted special funds to initiate 
nutrition investigations in the United States Department of Agriculture, 
This resulted in an expanding program of food and nutrition research using 
both human subjects and animals. An outgrowth of this was courses of study 
in land-grant institutions which became known as the home economics curriculum, 

By 1902, home economics curriculum expanded from its limited beginning 
to include courses reflecting current social and scientific developments. 
In 1915 the United States Department of Agriculture, with authority secured 
from Congress, made a partial reorganization of the department which in- 
cluded the Office of Experiment Stations and a newly created Office of 
Home Economics. This gave impetus to the growth of hpme economics curriculum 
and widened the scope of the home economics research and extension programs 
to include consumer economics, housing, clothing and other goods and services. 

In 1923 the Office of Home Economics was elevated to Bureau status and 
funds for its research were provided through the annual Appropriation Acts, 
In subsequent reorganizations, the Bureau of Home Economics became the 
Bureau of Human Nutrition and Home Economics in 1943 and then the Institute 
of Home Economics in 1957, Currently, there are the following divisions 
in the Institute of Home Economics: the Clothing and Housing Division; the 
Household Economics Research Division; and the Human Nutrition Research 
Division, 

The liberal scope of the research areas authorized by the Federal- 
grant Acts provided a firm base for the Home Economics Research program 
at both the land-grant institutions and in the United Stated Department 
of Agriculture. This stimulated the growth of Home Economics Curriculum 
at the undergraduate and graduate levels in land-grant institutions. 
The early years were primarily concerned with the establishment and develop- 
ment of curriculum; and education in the basic disciplines as well as the 
applied aspects became part of the program. 

The year 1962 (Land-Grant Centennial) marks an important milestone 
for Home Economics which has made an impressive record in the past century 
at home and abroad. Now, the progressive economic, technologic?.! and social 
environment of this new age demand more intensive and broad educational 
experience. Currently, Home Economics resident instruction, research and 
extension objectives are being further strengthened and expanded to meet 
this challenge. 



-4 



SUMMARY OF PROPOSED CHANGES 



PROPO SED CURRICULA REVISION : 

■■ i ■ i ■ ■ ■ — 

from- 

Foods and Nutrition and 
Institutional Administration 

Pre-Research in Foods and 
Nutrition 



to- 



Food and Nutrition 

1. Dietetic and Institutional 
Administration 

2. Food and Nutrition in Business 



Merchandising 



Textiles, Clothing and Related Arts 
1. Fashion in Retailing and 
Business 



Home Economics Education and 
Extension 

Child Growth and Development 




Home Economics Education 

1. Nursery School Education 

2. Secondary Education and 
Extension 



The curricula revisions utilize present courses which have been revised and 
coded and numbered to conform to sequence progression. H.Ec. 54, Nutrition, and 
H. Ec. 87, Principles and Practices of Tailoring have been deleted. The 
strengthening of the present offerings was a primary consideration in the 
revision. 



PROPOSED NEW COURSES : 

TCRA 21 Man and Clothing 

TCRA 42 Fashion in Retailing and Business 

MFE 50 Family Management and Decision Making 

TCRA 66 Apparel and Home Furnishing Accessories 

MFE 74 Consumer Attitude and Demands 

TCRA 76 History of Decorative Arts 

TCRA 85 Fashion Industries 

TCRA 93 Retail Field Experience 



-5 
SCHOOL OF HOME ECONOMICS 

Marion A, Niederpruera, Dten 



The School of Home Economics encompasses an area of study which 
applies the principles and concepts of the fundamental arts and sciences 
to the physiological, psychological, social, and economic environmental 
needs of man. 

The curricula of the school have been designed to provide a liberal 
education with depth in specialized areas of Foods and Nutrition, Textilesr 
Clothing and Related Arts, and Home Economics Education to insure profes- 
sional competence. The transitional continuing relationships between 
liberal and professional education seek to develop in the student a dis- 
ciplined mind, mental curiosity, and professional aspirations. 

Options under these majors lead to challenging and creative positions 
in industry, government, business, education, and service. Experience and 
advanced study in areas of specialization are needed to meet the demand for 
competent Home Economists to assume responsible roles in today's progressive 
society, and to develop the administrators, executives and research leaders 
for the future. The candidates for BS degree in Home Economics will meet 
the University's general education requirements and core courses* in Home 
Economics as well as specific requirements prescribed in each field of 
spec ial izat ion. 

*Core Courses: FN 27; TCRA 21, 23; MFE 50. 



FOOD AND NUTRITION 

Food and Nutrition offers curricula which provide a strong foundation 
in the arts and sciences to support basic courses in foods and nutrition 
under two options: Dietetics and Institutional Administration; and Food and 
Nutrition in Business, 

Dietetic and Institutional Administration 



This curriculum is planned to meet the basic requirements of the 
American Dietetic Association for admission to approved dietetic intern- 
ships or other on-the-job training programs. In addition, the curriculum 
includes liberal studies to help meet the demands of today's society. 
The program prepares the graduate for positions as staff and administrative 
dietitians in various types of food service; nutritionists with schools, 
Public Health and social welfare agencies; teaching and research dietitians. 
The sequence offers opportunities for further work at the graduate level 
for the student interested in college teaching, positions with extension 
and other government services, research in institutions of higher learning, 
medical centers and industry. 



MAJOR IN DIETETIC .AND. INST IT UT ION AL „ ADMI N IS1 RAT IOM 



General Education 
Home Economics Core 
Semi-Prof essional 
(incl. Gen. Ed.) 



Credits 

60 

9 

15 



Professional 
Electives 
Physical Education 

Credits 124 



-6 



Credits 



25 

15 

8 



I. General Education 



Credits 



English 1 and 2, Composition 

English 25 and 26, Masterpieces of Western Literature 

Speech 3, Oral Consnunication 

Economics 25, Elements of 

Sociology 25, Introductory 

Psychology i , General 

History 5, 6, 25, or 26, or 

Government 25, 26, 51, 52, 61, 62, or 66 
Chemistry 1 and 2, General 
Chemistry 33, Organic 
Chemistry 79, Elementary Biochemistry 
Zoology 1, Introductory 
Zoology 35, Vertebrate Physiology 
Bacteriology 31, Introductory 
Mathematics 1, Introductory 

Accounting 25, Introduction to Accounting 
Limited Electives - to be selected from the 

following areas: Music, Art, Speech, 

Anthropology, Philosophy, or Language 



4 
6 
2 
3 
3 
3 

3 
6 
4 
4 
3 
3 
4 
3 
3 



6 



II. Home Economics Core 



FN 27, Man and Nutrition 

Select two from remaining three core courses: 

TCRA 21, Man and Clothing 

TCRA 23, Art for Living 

MFE 50, Family Management and Decision Making 



III. Semi-Profess ional 



FN 30, Food Science and Preparation 3 

HEEd 81, Adult Education in Home Economics 3 

Limited Electives - to be selected from the 
following sequence: 
MFE 74, Consumer Attitude and Demand 
MFE 77, Theory and Application of Management 
Public Health 61 or 62, General 6c Community Sanitation 
Economics 79, Labor Problems 
Horticulture 74, Merchandising of Perishables 9 

or 
Honors 6 

Research Problems 3 



. * 1 



Ma jor in Dietetic and Institutiona l Administrat i on(c ortt) , 



-7 



I 



IV. Professional Credits 

FN 51, Meal Management 3 

FN 91, 92, Institutional Administration 8 

FN 52, Advanced Nutrition and Dietetics 3 

FN 89, Nutrition in Disease 3 

FN 94, Experimental Foods 3 

Management 64, Personnel Management 3 

FN 95, Seminar in Institutional Administration or Foods 1 

FN 96, Seminar in Nutrition 1 

Elect ives 15 



•cj 



,< i 



-8 



} 



MAJOR IN DIETETIC AND INSTITUTIONAL ADMINISTRATION 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



1st semester 



English 1, Composition 
*Speech 3 

Chemistry 1, General 
FN 27, Man and Nutrition 
Foreign Language or 

Humanities Elective 
Sociology 25, Introductory 
Physical Education 5, 7 



Credits 

2 
2 
3 
3 

3 
3 



2nd semester 

English 2, Composition 
Chemistry 2, General 
Psychology i , General 
Mathematics 1, Introduction 
Zoology 1, Introduction 
Physical Education 6, 8 



Credits 

2 
3 
3 
3 
3 



*May be taken either semester 
If a foreign language is elected, student must complete the intermediate year. 



1st semester 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Credits 2nd semester 



English 25 

Economics 25, Elements of 
*Zoology 35, Vertebrate Physiol. 
I Chemistry 33, Organic 

I Elective 

■ Physical Education 25, 27 

*May be taken either semester 



3 English 26 

3 History or Government Elective 

3 *Bacteriology 31, Introductory 

4 FN 30, Food Science & Preparation 
3 Accounting 25, Introduction 

Physical Education 26, 28 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Credits 

3 
3 
4 
3 
3 



1st semester 



Credits 



2nd semester 



Credits 



FN 51, Meal Management 3 

Limited Elective 3 

HE Core Elective 3 

Chemistry 79, Elementary Biochem. 4 

HEEd. 81, Adult Ed. in HE 3 



FN 52, Adv. Nutri. & Diet. 
FN 94, Experimental Foods 
HE Core Elective 
Limited Elective 
Management 64, Personnel Mgt. 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



SENIOR YEAR 



1st semester 



Credits 



2nd semester 



Credits 



FN 89, Nutrition in Disease 3 

FN 91, Inst. Adn. 4 
FN 95, Seminar in 

Inst. Adm. or Foods 1 

Electives 6 



FN 92, Quantity Food Preparation 4 

FN 96, Seminar in Nutrition 1 

Elective 6 

Limited Elective 6 



'. vt :(■■ 



:.!'? 



-9 



Food and Nutrition in Business 



y 



This curriculum is based on professional training in Food and Nutrition 
combined with selected courses in the humanities, social sciences and business. 
The program is designed for the student who is oriented to the business world, 
and leads directly into product development or consumer services with food and 
equipment industries. Positions are open in the field of communications for the 
student who combines her knowledge of Food and Nutrition with Journalism, English 
and Public Speaking. Graduates with a major in this sequence are also placed in 
advertising and public relations agencies or with a consulting firm. This curri- 
culum allows students to pursue graduate study. 



MAJOR IN FOOD AND NUTRITION IN BUSINESS 



Credits 



Credits 



General Education 
Home Economics Core 
Semi-Profess ional 
(incl. Gen. Ed.) 



65 

9 

16 



Professional 
Electives 
Physical Education 



23 

15 

8 



Credits 128 



I. General Education Credits 

English 1 and 2, Composition 4 

English 25 and 26, Masterpieces of Western Literature 6 

Speech 3, Oral Communication 2 

Speech 51, Voice and Diction and Oral Interpretation 3 
Philosophy 11, Basic Ideas Western Civilization or 

31, Intro. Logic and Scientific Method or 

42, Ethics or 

82, Aesthetics 3 

Journalism 51, Intro, to Mass Communications 3 

Psychology i, General 3 

Economics 25, Elements of 3 

Food Economics 75, Food Marketing 3 

Food Economics 78, Food Merchandising 3 

Sociology 25, Introductory 3 
Government 25, American or 

Government 66, American Political Thought 3 

Chemistry 1 and 2, General 6 

Chemistry 33, Organic 4 

Mathematics I, Introductory 3 

Zoology 1, Introductory 3 

Zoology 35, Vertebrate Physiology 3 

Bacteriology 31, Introductory 4 

Art 31, Basic Design 3 



II. Home Economics Core 



FN 27, Man and Nutrition 

TCRA 23, Art for Living 

MFE 50, Family Management and Decision Making 



3 

3 
3 



>-•: 



* - 



-10 



\ 



Major in Food and Business(conC. ) 

I 

III. Semi-P rofess ipnal Credits 

MFE 75, Personal and Family Economics 3 

MFE 77, Theory and Application of Management 3 

Marketing 53, Marketing Principles 3 

Marketing 62, Marketing Research 3 

Chemistry 79, Elementary Biochemistry* 4 

*Not required for utility work. Substitute 
Marketing 54, Salesmanship & Sales Management 



IV . Professional 

FN 30, Food Science and Preparation 3 

FN 51, Meal Management 3 

FN 52, Advanced Nutrition and Dietetics 3 

HEEd. 61, Communication by Demonstration Methods 3 

FN 92, Quantity Food Preparation 4 

FN 94, Experimental Foods 3 

MEF 74, Consumer Attitudes and Demand 3 

FN 95, Seminar in Foods 1 

Elect ives 15 



.;•. : : 



-11 



MAJOR IN FOOD AND NUTRITION IN BUSINESS 



1st semester 

English 1, Compos it ipn 

Speech 3, Communications 

Chemistry 1, General 

FB 27, Man and Nutrition 

Sociology 25, Introductory 

Elective 

Physical Education 5, 7 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



Credits 2nd semester 



2 
2 
3 
3 
3 
3 



English 2, Composition 

Psychology i , General 

Chemistry 2, General 

Zoology 3, Introductory 

TCRA, Art for Living 

Elective 

Physical Education 6, 8 



Credits 

2 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



1st semester 

English 25 

Chemistry 33, Organic 

Speech 51, Voice & Diction 

Zoology 35, Vertebrate Physiology 

Elective 

Physical Education 25, 27 



Credits 2nd semester 



3 
4 
3 
3 
3 



English 26 

Bacteriology 31, Intro. 
FN 30, Food Sci. & Prep. 
Mathematics I, Intro. 
Economics 25, Elements 
Physical Education 26, 28 



Credits 

3 
4 
3 
3 
3 



JUNIOR YEAR 



1st semester 



Credits 2nd semester 



Credits 



FN 51, Meal Management 3 

MEF 75, Personal & Family Finance 3 

Chemistry 79, Elementary Biochem.* 4 

or Marketing 54 3 

Marketing 53, Principles 3 
Journalism 51, Introduction to 

Mass Communication 3 

*Not required for students interested 
in utility work. 



FN 52, Advanced Nutri, & Diet. 3 

FN 94, Experimental Foods 3 

Philosophy - select one: 

11, Basic Ideas of West. Civ. 

31, Intro. Logic & Scient.Meth. 

42, Ethics 

82, Aesthetics 3 

MFE 50, Family Mgt, & Dec is. Making 3 
Elective 3 



SENIOR YEAR 



1st semester 



Credits 2nd semester 



Credits 



HEEd. 61, Communication by 

Demonstration Methods 3 

FN 95, Seminar in Foods 1 

MFE 74, Consumer Attitudes & Demand 3 

MFE 77, Theory & Appl. of Mgt. 3 

Food Economics 75, Food Mktg. 3 

Elective 3 



FN 92, Quantity Food Prep. 4 

Food Econ. 78, Food Merchandising 3 
Government 25, American or 

Government 66, Amer. Pol it .Thought 3 

Marketing 62, Marketing Research 3 

Art 31, Basic 3 



TEXTILES, CLOTHI NG AND RELATED ARTS 



-12 



A field of specialization in this area is entitled FASHION IN RETAILING and 
BUSINESS, The retailing and professional opportunities associated with clothing, 
textiles, home furnishings and related merchandise are limitless. They include 
positions with manufacturers, producers, retailers, buying organizations, news- 
papers and magazines, radio and TV, consumer groups as well as educational in- 
stitutions and social and government agencies* The student who is interested in 
the business field can get, by specializing in this area, a curriculum with a 
strong program of liberal arts with emphasis on the social sciences* Courses 
which build on this base toward professional business competency include fun- 
damentals of clothing, textiles, fashion and related arts as well as courses in 
business, retailing and related subjects. 



MAJOR IN FASHION IN RETAILING AND BUSINESS 



General Education 
Home Economics Core 
Semi-Prof essional 

(including Gen. Ed.) 



Credits 

60 

9 

22 





Credits 


Professional 


24 


Electives 


12 


Physical Education 


8 


Credits 


127 



I» General Education 

English 1 and 2, Composition 

Speech 3, Oral Communication 

English 25 and 25, Masterpieces of Western Literature 

Foreign Language or Proficiency 

Mathematics I, Introductory 

Physical or Biological Science - 

3 Sciences or 2 Sciences and Math II 
Sociology 25, Introductory 
Psychology I, General 
Economics 25, Elements of 

Economics 55, Consumption and Personal Finance 
Limited Electives, one from each 
following sequence: 

Philosophy 31, 42, 82 

Government 25, 66 

Sociology 59 

Psychology 62, 79 



4 
2 
6 
12 
3 

9 
3 
3 
3 
3 
12 



II. Home Economics Core 



TCRA 21, Man and Clothing 

TCRA 23, Art for Living 

FN 27, Man and Nutrition or 

MFE 50, Family Management, and Decision Making 



3 
3 



Textiles, Clothing and Related Arts 
III, Semi-Prof essional 



Credits 



-13 



TCRA 28, Fundamentals of Clothing Const, or 

TCRA 53, Advanced Clothing Construction 

TCRA 24, Textiles I 

TCRA 86, Textiles II 

TCRA 65, Apparel Selection and Design 

TCRA 66, Apparel & Home Furnishing Accessories 

TCRA 85, Fashion Industries 

HEEd. 61, Communication by Demonstration Methods 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
4 
3 



IV. Professional 



TCRA 42, Fashion in Retailing and Business 3 

Marketing 53, Principles 3 

Marketing 71, Retail Merchandising 3 

MFE 74, Consumer Attitudes and Demand 3 

TCRA 93, Retailing Field Experience 6 
TCRA 95, Seminar in Fashion in Retailing & Business 3 

TCRA 97 or 98, Problems in Retailing 3 

Electives 12 



:\". ■ '• 



MAJOR IN FASHION IN RETAILING AND BUSINESS 



-14 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



1st semester Credit s 

English 1, Composition 2 

Speech 3, Communication 2 
Science, Physical or Biological 3 

Sociology 25 3 

Language 3 

TCRA 23, Art for Living 3 
Physical Education 5, 7 



2nd semester Credits 

English 2, Composition 2 
Science, Physical or Biological 3 

Psychology, I 3 

Language 3 

TCRA 24, Textiles I 3 
Physical Education 6, 8 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



1st semester 



Credits 



2nd semester 



Credits 



English 25 3 
Science, Physical or Biological or 

Mathematics 1 3 

Economics, 25 3 

Language 3 

TCRA 21, Man & Clothing 3 
Physical Education 25, 27 



English 26 
Mathematics 



1 or 2 



Economics, 55 

Language 

TCRA 42, Fashion in Retailing 

and Business 
TCRA 28, Fund, of Clothing 

Construction or 
TCRA 53, Adv. Clothing Construction 
Physical Education 26, 28 



JUNIOR YEAR 



1st semester 



Credits 



2nd semester 



Credits 



Marketing 53, Prin, 3 
Sociology 59, Social Stratification 

or Anthropology 63 Social 3 
TCRA 65, Apparel Selection and 

Design 3 

HEEd. 61 3 
Communication by Demonstration 

Methods 3 

Elective 3 



Marketing 71, Retail Merch, 

MFE 74, Con, Attitudes and Demand 

Psych, 62, Social or Psych, 79, 

Personality 
TCRA 66, Apparel and Home 

Furnishing Accessories 

Elective 



3 

3 



SENIOR YEAR 



1st semester 



Credits 2nd semester 



Credits 



Block 

TCRA 85, Fashion Indus, 

TCRA 95, Seminar in Fashion 

Retailing & Business 
TCRA 93, Retailing Field 
Experience 



4 
3 
6 



Government 25, Amer, or 

Government 66, Amer, Pol, Thought 3 

TCRR, 86. Textiles II 3 



Philosophy 42, Ethics or 
Philosophy 31, Logic or 
Philosophy 82, Aesthetics 
Core Elective 
Elective 



3 
3 
3 



-15 
HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION 

Home Economics Education offers curricula which provide a broad cultural 
education and preparation for teaching under two options: Secondary Education 
and Extension; and Nursery School Education. 

Secondary Education and Extension 

The School of Home Economics, in cooperation with the School of Education, 
prepares students for teaching Home Economics in junior and senior high schools. 
Students interested in Home Economics Ex tens ion, with the aid of an extension 
advisor, select courses that prepare them for continuing education positions in 
extension in both adult and 4-H programs. This curriculum provides basic training 
for graduate work in the field of home economics teaching and extension. 



MAJOR IN SECONDARY EDUCATION AND EXTENSION 



Credits 



Credits 



General Education 
Home Economics Core 
Semi-Profess ional 
(incl. Gen. Ed.) 



61 

9 

15 



Professional 
Elect ives 
Physical Education 

Credits 128 



34 
9 

8 



I. General Education 



Credits 



English 1 and 2, Composition 

English 25 and 26, Masterpieces of Western Literature 

Speech 3, Oral Communication 

Speech 51, Voice & Diction & Oral Interpretation or 

English 51, Advanced Expository Writing 
Sociology 25, Introductory 
Sociology 57, The Family 
Psychology x > General 
Psychology 56, Educational 
Psychology 66, Adolescent 
History 25 and 26, American 
Philosophy 11, 31, 42, or 51 
Government 25, 52, 53, 56, 63, 66, or 72 
Economics 25, Elements of 
Chemistry 1 and 2, General 
Chemistry 33, Organic 
Mathematics I, Introductory 
Sociology 51, 52, 59, 75 or 

Economics 26, 53, 55 



4 
6 
2 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
6 
3 
3 
3 
6 
4 
3 



II. Home Economics Core 

FN 27, Man and Nutrition 
TCRA 23, Art for Living 

MFE 50, Family Management and Decision Making 



3 
3 
3 



Major in Secondary Education and Extension(cont. ) 

III. Seroi-Profe s sionai Credits 

Education 51, History of Education 3 

Education 52, Principles amd Methods of Teaching 3 

FN 30, Food Science and Preparation 3 

TCRA 24, Textiles I . 3 
TCRA 28, Fundamentals of Clothing Construction or 

TCRA 21, Man and Clothing 3 



IV. Professional 

HEEd, 82, Curriculum in Home Economics 3 

Ed. 85, Observation and Student Teaching 6 

FN 51, Meal Management 3 

FN 73, Nutrition During Growth and Development 3 

TCRA 53, Advanced Clothing Construction 3 

TCRA 65, Apparel Selection and Design 3 

TCRA 79, Interior Design 3 

MFE 75, Personal and Family Economics 3 

HEEd. 61, Communication by Demonstration Methods 3 

MFE 77, Theory and Application of Management 3 

HEEd .95, Seminar in Home Economics Education 1 

Elect ives 9 



-16 



':.\ • 



MAJOR IN SECONDARY EDUCATION AND EXTENSION 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



-17 



1st semester 

English 1, Composition 

Speech 3, Oral Communication 

Chemistry 1, General 

FN 27, Man and Nutrition 

Sociology 25, Introductory 

Government 25 

Physical Education 5, 7 



Credits 2nd semester 

2 English 1, Composition 

2 Psychology I , General 

3 Chemistry 2, General 

3 Mathematics I, Introductory 

3 TCRA 24, Textiles I 

3 Physical Education 6, 8 



Credits 

2 
3 
3 
3 
3 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



1st semester 



Credits 



English 25 3 

Philosophy 11, 31, 42, or 51 3 

Chemistry 33, Organic 4 

TCRA 25, Art for Living 3 

TCRA 65, Apparel Select. & Design 3 
Physical Education 25, 27 



2nd semester 



Credits 



English 26 3 

Economics, Elements of 3 

FN 30, Food Science & Prep 3 

TCRA 28, Fund. Cloth. Constr. or 

TCRA 21, Man and Clothing 3 
MFE 50,Fam.Mgt.and Decis. Making 3 
Physical Education 26, 28 



JUNIOR YEAR 



1st semester 



Credits 



2nd a ©me iter 



Credits 



Speech 51 or English 51 3 

Sociology 57, The Family 3 

FN 51, Meal Management 3 

TCRA 53, Adv. Clothing Construction 3 

History 25, American 3 

HEEd. 95, Seminar in HEEd. 1 



Psychology 56, Educational 3 

Ed. 51, History of Education 3 

History 26, American 3 

MFE 77, Theory & Appl. of Mgt. 3 

Elect ives 6 



SENIOR YEAR 



1st semester 



Credits 



2nd semester 



Credits 



Psychology 66, Adolescent 3 
FN 61, Communication by 

Demonstration Methods 3 

TCRA 79, Interior Design 3 

MFE 75, Family Economics 3 
FN 73, Nutrition During Growth 

and Development 3 

Elective 3 



Education 52, Methods 3 

HEEd. 82, Curriculum 3 

Education 85, Practice Teaching 6 



-18 
Nursery School Education 

Students with a special interest in young children may elect this option. 
All are required to take courses in the College of Arts and Sciences which enrich 
the basic courses of the Nursery School Education curriculum. Observation and 
participation in the nursery school activities facilitate the study of the pre- 
school child. More intensive specialization for qualified students may be obtained 
through the election of one semester affiliation during the senior year with: 
(1) Merrill-Palmer School in Detroit, Michigan, which specializes in the study of 
human development and family life; (2) Eliot-Pearson School in Boston, Massachu- 
setts, which gives professional training for teaching in nursery schools and 
kindergartens. This option prepares the student to become a nursery school teacher, 
a teacher of exceptional children-nursery school level, or a teacher in hospital 
recreation programs. A student graduating with an option in Nursery School Educa- 
tion is well-qualified to pursue graduate work, 

MAJOR IN NURSERY SCHOOL EDUCATION 

Credits Credits 

General Education 6o Professional 



Home Economics Core 9 Electives 

Serai-Professional 6 Physical Education 



(incl. Gen. Ed.) 



Credits 121 



I. General Education Credits 

English 1 and 2, Composition 4 

English 25 and 26, Masterpieces of Western Literature 6 

Speech 3, Oral Communication 2 

Zoology 1, Introductory 3 

Zoology 37 and 38, Human Anatomy and Physiology 6 

Socioloty 25, Introductory 3 

Psychology I or II, General 3 

Economics 25, Elements of 3 

Government 25, 52, 53, 56, 63, 66, or 72 3 

Statistics 77, Elementary Experimental Statistics 3 

Philosophy 11, 31, 42, 51, 72, or 82 3 

English 51, or Speech 51, 91, 92, or 93 3 

Foreign Language or proficiency 12 

(if proficiency in language is accomplished before 
the completion of 12 credits, electives taken in 
place of the language are to be chosen from a 
selected list of courses from the following areas: 
Zoology, Psychology, Speech, Sociology and Anthro- 
pology, Recreation and Physical Education, Education, 
and Public Health) 
Limited Electives 6 

To be chosen from the following areas: 
Anthropology, Art, Biological Sciences, Economics, 
Education, English or American Literature, History, 
Home Economics (core only), Music, Physical Sciences 



31 
15 
8 



-19 



Major in Nursery School Education (cont.) 

II. Hone Economics Core Credits 

FN 27, Man and Nutrition 3 

TCRA 23, Art for Living 3 

MFE 50, Family Management and Decision Making 3 

III. Semi-Professional 

Anthropology 63, Social Anthropology 3 

Psychology 83, Abnormal Psychology 3 

11111111 ' ' ' i ' i ' 

IV. Professional 

Psychology 65, Child Psychology or 

HD 70, Child Development 3 

Sociology 57, The Family 3 
Music 85, Music Education -- Music for the 

Elementary School Teacher 3 

HEEd, 63, Art Activity in Recreation 3 
Elective from area of Psychology, Zoology, Sociology, 
Recreation and Physical Education, Education, 

Public Health, Speech 3 

HD 83, 84, Nursery School Management 6 

FN 73, Nutrition During Growth and Development 3 

HD 95, Seminar in Human Development 2 

HD 96, Seminar in Human Development 2 

HD 97, Problems in Nursery School Management 3 

Elect ives 15 



:.'.' 



> 



MAJOR IN NURSERY SCHOOL EDUCATION 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



-20 



1st semester 

English 1, Composition 
Zoology 1, Introductory 
Foreign Language or proficiency 
FN 27, Man and Nutrition 
Psychology I or II, General 
Speech 3, Oral Communication 
Physical Education 5 and 7 



Credits 2nd semester 



Credits 



2 
3 
3 
3 
3 
2 



English 2, Composition 2 

Economics 25, Elements of 3 

Foreign Language or proficiency 3 

Sociology 25, Introductory 3 

Elective 3 
Physical Education 6 and 8 



1st semester 

English 25 

Zoology 37, Human Anatomy and 

Physiology 
Foreign Language or proficiency 
Psychology 65, Child Psychology or 

HD 70, Child Development 
Elective 
Physical Education 25 and 27 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Credits 2nd semester 



3 
3 

3 
3 



Credits 



English 26 

Zoology 38, Human Anatomy and 

Physiology 
Foreign Language or proficiency 
TCRA 23, Art for Living 
Sociology 57, The Family or 

HD 80, Human Dev. in Family 
Physical Education 26 and 28 



3 
3 
3 



JUNIOR YEAR 



1st semester 



Credits 2nd semester 



HD 83, Nursery School Management 3 

HEEd. 63, Art Activity in Recreation 3 

MFE 50, Mgt. & Decision Making 3 
Music 85, Music Ed. -- Music for the 

Elementary School Teacher 3 

Elective 3 



Credits 



Psychology 83, Abnormal 
HD 84, Nursery School Mgt. 
Statistics 77, Elem. Experimental 
English 51 or 

Speech 51, 91, 92, or 93 
Government 25,52,53,56,63,64, 

66, or 72 



3 
3 
3 



SENIOR YEAR 



1st semester 



Credits 2nd semester 



Credits 



Anthropology 63, Social 

FN 73, Nutrition During Growth 

and Development 
Philosophy 11,31,42,51,72, or 82 
HD 95, Seminar in Human Development 
HD 97, Special Problems in Nursery 
School Education 



3 
3 
2 



Affiliation at the Merrill-Palmer 
Institute or the Eliot-Pearson 
School or : 

Electives selected from Psychology, 
Speech, Sociology, Recreation, 
Physical Ed., Education, Public 
Health, Zoology 3 

Electives: to be chosen from the 
areas of Anthropology, Art, 
Biological Sciences, Economics, 
Education, English or American 
Literature, History, HE (core only), 
Mus ic , Phys . Sc i ,, Psychology , 
Sociology 6 

Electives 6 

HD 96, Seminar in Human Develop. 2 



-21 

RECOMMENDED NEW COURSES 

The major sequences in the School of Home Economics in the past were 
organized to meet the needs of that time. In the reorganization of the 
School of Home Economics (the development of which has been described 
previously) consideration of the economic, technological, and social 
environment of this age has resulted in our offering a broader general 
education program and more intensive study in an area of specialization. 
Therefore, it has been necessary to go through the processes of complete 
curricula development in order to evolve new major sequences which will 
meet the needs of the student in the present and the future* 

To supplement existing courses, which have been revised and up-dated, 
a few new courses are considered necessary at this time to strengthen the 
work offered in certain areas. They are as follows: 

TCRA 21 Man and Clothing 

TCRA 42 Fashion in Retailing and Business 

MFE 50 Family Management and Decision Making 
TCRA 66 Apparel and Home Furnishing Accessories 

MFE 74 Consumer Attitude and Demands 

TCRA 76 History of Decorative Arts 

TCRA 85 Fashion Industries 

TCRA 93 Retailing Field Experience 

The TCRA courses will be introduced over a three year transitional 
period. Current staff with the aid of Dean Niederpruem and several 
well qualified extension specialists will teach these courses. At present, 
there is no need for new equipment, new staff or other facilities for these 
courses. The enrollment in the present major in Fashion Merchandising is 
20% of the total, and these young people must be served more effectively to 
meet the competition of other graduates majoring in this area who are 
entering the business world. 

The other courses are also covered at this time by staff and existing 
facilities. 



-22 
TCRA (new course) 

21. (I) (core) MAN AND CLOTHING 

The impact of clothing and textiles, its sociological, psychological 
and economic implications to the individual and society, seen in historic 
and contemporary perspective. Prerequisites: Sociology 25, Psychology i, 
Economics 25, or by permission of instructor. 3 class hours. Credit, 3. 
Miss V, Davis, 

Objectives ; 

1. To provide a comprehensive understanding of the role of clothing 
in our lives and in society. 

2. To relate psychological and sociological theories to clothing 
for the individual. 

3. To provide an understanding of the textile and clothing industry 
as a dynamic force in world economy, both historically and 
contemporaneously, 

4. To relate these forces to present day consumer problems in 
clothing selection. 

Rationale : 

The clothing customs, needs, desires and demands of American families 
today are influenced by a multitude of circumstances. Clothing, to man and 
society, has been and is something more than a superficial covering for the 
body. It has been affected by religion, morals, politics and most of our 
social and economic institutions through the ages. We all wear clothes, but 
few people know why. Nor do they have an understanding of the interrelation 
of these forces upon clothing, and the dynamic effect which clothing and 
textiles have on man. This course will provide an introduction and comprehen- 
sive view of the psychological and socio-economic impact of clothing, and relate 
this to contemporary consumer market problems. 

Outline and Course Content : 

A, Theories related to the origins of clothing 

B, Sociological implications of clothing 

C, Psychological implications of clothing 

D, Economic implications of clothing and textiles 

E, Consumer problems in clothing selection, related 
to family needs, values, etc,, technological and 
distributive changes. 



In Interrelated 
Historic and 
Contemporary 
Perspective 



-23 
SUPPORTIVE PUBLISHED MATERIALS 



Reference st 



Bendix and Lipset, Class. Status and Power 

Biesang, J. and M, , Modern Society. New York, Prentice-Hall, 1954 

Campbell, Persia, The Consumer Interest . New York, Harpers, 1949 

Cunnington, C. W # , Why Women Wear Clothes 

Dewhurst and Assoc., Americas Need and Resources . New York, twentieth Century 

Fund, 1955 
Dingwall, Eric, American Woman 
Flugel, J. C,, The Psychology of Dress 
Hiler, Hilaire, From Nudity to Raiment 

Hurlock, Elizabeth, Adolescent Development. New York, McGraw-Hill Book Co., 1949 
Lindsey, Gardner, Handbook of Social Psychology 
Lynes, Russell, A Surfiet of Honey 

Lynes, Russell, The Tastemakers . New York, Harper Brothers, 1954 
McMahon, Social and Economic Patterns of Living 
Merton, Robert, Social Theory and Social Structure 
Myrdal-Alva, Woman f s Two Roles - Home and Work 
Norris, R, T,, The Theory of Consumer Demand 

Nystrom, Paul, Economics of Fashion . New York, Ronald Press Co,, 1931 
Ogburn W. and Nlmkoff, M., Technology and the Changing Family, Boston, 

Houghton Mifflin Co., 1955 
Rudolf sky, Bernard, Are Clothes Modern?. Chicago, Poole Bros., 1947 
Veblen, T., Theory of the Leisure Class. New York, MacMillan Co., 1899 
Whyte, W. H., The Organization Man . New York, Simon and Schuster, 1956 
Wingate, J. W,, and Corbin, Arnold, Changing Patterns in Retailing . 1956 
Wolff, Janet, What Makes Women Buy ?. New York, McGraw-Hill, 1958 
Barber, B. and Label, Fashion in Women's Clothes and the American Social 

System. Social Forces . Dec. 1952 
Barr, Estelle, A Psychological Analysis of Fashion Motivation. Arch, of 

Psychology. No. Ill, 1929 
Bliss, Sylvia, The Significance of Clothes. American Journal of Psychology. 

Vol. 28, 1916*" 
Bogardus, E. S. The Social Psychology of Fads. Journal of Applied Sociology . 

Vol. 8, 1923-24 
Burck, Gilbert, What Makes Uomen Buy ? Fortune, August, 1956 
Dunlap, Knight, The Development and Function of Clothing . Journal of Genetics . 

Vol. 1, 1928 
Flaccus, L. W., Remarks on the Psychology of Clothes. Journal of Genetic 

Psychology. Vol. 1, 1916 
Harms, Ernst, The Psychology of Clothes . American Journal of Sociology. 

Vol. 44, 1938 
Hartman, George, Clothing: Personal Problem and Social Issue . Journal of 

Home Economics . June, 1949 
Jack and Schiffer, The Limits of Fashion Control. American Sociological 

Review. December, 1948 
Monroe, Day., Clothing Consumption . Proceedings of the 13th Conference of 

College Teachers of Textiles and Clothing . Central Region, 1957 
Rosencranz, Mary Lou, Sociological Aspects of Clothing Studied in East Lansing ^ 

Michigan. Journal of Home Economics. Vol. 41, 1949 
Simmel, George, Fashion. American Journal of Sociology. Vol. 62 
Sundquist, Alice and Mary Whit lock, The Consumer Speaks - About House Dresses . 

Journal of Home Economics. Nov, 1946 



-24 

References: (continued) 

Thomas, W. I., Psychology of ilodesty and Clothes. American Journal of 

Psychology. Vol. 5 
Psychology of Women's Dress, American Magazine. 1908-09 
Dress, Fashion, Guilds, Encycl o pedia of Social Sciences 
U, S. Dept. of Agriculture, Family Clothing Inventories and Purchases by 

Place of Residence. May 1951 
Brew, Margaret, American Clothing Consumption 1879-1909. University of 

Chicago, 1945 
Monroe, Day et al,, Family Income and Expenditures. U.S.D.A., Misc. Pub. 465 

1941 
Pennel, Maryland et al., Family Expenditures for Clothing. U.S.D.A., Misc. 

Pub. 442, 1941 
Ryan, Mary, Psychological Effects of Clothing. Part I, II, III, Cornell 

University Experiment Station Bulletins, 1952-53 
Stone, G. and Form, W., Clothing Inventories and Preferences Among Rural and 

Urban Families. Michigan State Univ., Bulletin 246, March 1955 

Research: 

Gates, Ruth E., Clothing and Social Mobility . Unpublished Ph.D. dissertation, 

College of Home Economics, Pennsylvania State Univ., 1960 
Lap it sky, Mary, Clothing Values and Their Relation to General Values and to 

Social Security and Insecurity . Unpublished Ph.D. dissertation, College of 

Home Economics, Pennsylvania State University, 1960 
Silverman, Sylvia, Clothing and Appearance; Their Psychological Implications 

for Teen-Age Girls . Unpublished Ph.D, dissertation, Teachers College, 

Columbia University, 1945 
Vener, Arthur, Adolescent Orientations to Clothing: A Social-Psychological 

Interpretation. Unpublished Ph.D. dissertation, Michigan State University, 1957 



-25 

TCRA (new ceurse) 

(second year) 

42. (II) FASHION IN RETAILING AND BUSINESS 

A study of the retailing and professional opportunities associated 
with clothing, textiles, home furnishings and related merchandise. Analysis 
of the function of retailing, types of retail organizations and their 
internal organizations. Prerequisites: Economics 25. 3 class hours. 
Credit, 3, Miss Niederpruem. 

Objectives : 

1. To acquire a knowledge of the scope of executive career oppor- 
tunities in fashion retailing and related areas. 

2. To develop an appreciation and understanding of professionalism 
and high ethical business standards, 

3. To study the functions of retailing, 

4. To become familiar with the various types of retail organizations. 

5. To observe first hand the functions and operations of a small 
department store. 

6. To analyze in an organized way these functions and operations, 

7. To become oriented to store environment. 

Rationale : 

There is a real need for sophomores majoring in fashion in retailing 
and business to have a basic course in the fundamentals of this area of 
retailing and business. At this level students should develop understanding 
and appreciation of this professional area of study so that they can begin 
to make the necessary application to all the courses in this professional 
sequence , 



Content : 

1, Scope of professional opportunities in area, 

2, Interpretation of professionalism and business ethics, 

3, Delineation of the functions of retailing. 

4, Analysis of internal store functions, 

5, Present trends and developments in fashion in retailing and 
business. 



•..'.".'■ I 



.. vH .' j 



vf;: 



-26 
SUPPORTIVE PUBLISHED MATERIALS 



References : 



Buros, 0. K. (Ed.), Mental Measurements Yearbook . 1953 

Editors of Fortune, America In The Sixties. Harper Torchbook Edition, 

New York, 1960 
Engelsman, Ralph G. & Naomi L., Keys to Modern Selling. N. Y. D. McKay Co., 

1955 
Entenberg, Robert David, The Changing Competitive Position of Department 

Stores in the U. S. by Merchandise Lines. Pittsburgh. University of 

Pittsburgh Press, 1958 
Duncan, D. J, and Phillips, C. F., Retailing; Principles and Methods 
Harriman, Margaret Case, And The Price Is Right . Cleveland and N. Y,, The 

World Publishing Co., 1958 
Herndon, Boonton, Bergdorf *s on the Plaza. Alfred A. Knoph, 1956 
Horan, James David, The Pinkerton Story . N. Y,, Putnam, 1951 
Hoving, Walter, The Distribution Revolution. New York, Ives Washburn, Inc., 

1960 
Kelley, Pearce Clement & Briscoe, Norris B., Retailing Basic Principles . N. J., 

Prentice-Hall, 1957 
Leterman, Elmer G., The New Art of Selling . N, Y # , Harper, 1957 
Murphy, John D,, Secrets of Successful Selling j, Englewood Cliffs, N, J,, 

Prentice-Hall, 1956 
Packer, Harry Q., Basic Retailing. N. Y., Prentice Hall, 1954 
Robinson, Blacker and Logan, Store Salesmanship . Englewood Cliffs, N. J,, 

Prentice-Hall, Inc., 1959 
Robinson, 0, Preston, Robinson, G. & Matthews, Store Organization and Operation . 

N. J., Prentice-Hall, 1957 (2nd ed.) 
Robinson, 0, Preston, Robinson, C. H., Successful Retail Salesmanship . N. Y., 

Prentice-Hall 1955 (2nd ed.) 
Stanton, Edward M., Branch Stores. N. Y. National Retail Dry Good Assoc., 1955 
Wheeler, Elmer, Tested Retail Selling . N. Y., Prentice -Hall, 1956 (2nd ed.) 
Wingate, John A. and Corbin, A., Changing Patterns in Retailing. Homewood 

Illinois,; Richard D. Irwin, Inc., 1956 
N.R.D.G.A., Employee Testing for Retail Stores . N.R.D.G.A., Personnel Group, 

New York, 1951 
Cox, Reavis, The Marketing of Textiles. Washington, D. C.: The Textile 

Foundation, Inc., 1938 
Frank, B., Progressive Apparel Production - With Case Problems, Fairchild 

Publications, Inc., 1953 
Howell, L. D., Marketing and Manufacturing Services and Margins for Textiles. 

Washington, D. C.; U. S. Dept. of Agriculture, Tech. Bulletin No. 1062, 

Sept. 1952 
Levine, L., The Womens 1 Garment Workers r A History of the I.L.G.W.U., B. W. 

Huebsch, Inc., 1924 

Publications including: Stores, Department Store Economists, Display World, 

Printer's Ink, Womens Wear Daily, Vogue, Harpers 
Bazaar, American Fabrics, etc. 



-27 

MFE (new course) 

50. (II) (core) FAMILY MANAGEMENT AND DECISION MAKIKG 

Management and Decision-making in the Family. A presentation of 
the integrated nature of home management; concerns values and goals as 
reflected in decision-making about family resources, 3 class hours, 
Credit, 3. Staff. 

Objectives : 

1, To know and understand what management is, 

2. To be able to identify values and goals operative in home 
management. 

3. To be able to identify those aspects of family living that 
can be managed. 

4, To become familiar with and be able to relate managerial 
concepts to family living. 

Rationale : 

The family is regarded as the point of reference for this course. 
Management is a universal family function which concerns values and 
goals as reflected in decision-making about utilization of family re- 
sources. Home management as a field of learning is fundamentally phil- 
osophical thinking in relation to the family's clarification, identifi- 
cation, and pursuit of values and goals. A study of family management 
is for the purpose of improving one's understanding of management and 
furthering one's understanding of family behavior. With increased 
knowledge, it is now possible to teach management through formal educa- 
tion rather than relying upon trial and error, observation and experi- 
ence. The importance of management in the family is recognized because 
of its extensive effects in determining the quality of life which the 
individual and the family achieve. 

Outline and Course Content : 

A. Operational bases of course 

1. This course taught from the following bases 

a. Role differentiation of family members 

b. Family life cycle 

c. Psycho-socio-economic characteristics of families 

d. Cross-cultural characteristics 

2. Subject matter content meaningful when all parts of it 
are interrelated and activated. 

3. A family's management is related to the larger community. 



-28 



50. (II) 

Outline and Course Content : (continued) 
B. Subject matter content 

1. Definition of management 

2. Criteria for identifying managerial activities 

3. Purposes of managerial activities 

a. Ordering of the moral relationships 

b. Ordering of the routines and artifacts of the home 

k. Decision-making functions of a manager 

a. Value clarifying 

b. Goal defining 

c . Planning 

d. Integrating 

e. Facilitating 

f . Evaluating 

5 • De c is ion-making 

a. Centrality of decision-making in home management 

b. Degrees of deliberation and levels of rationality 
in decision-making 

6 . Values 

a. Definition 

b. Role of values in home management 

c. Clarifying values 

d. Managing for achieving values 

7 . Goals 

a. Goals and their relationship to values 

b. Clustering and priorities of goals 

c. Varying goals over the life cycle 

8. Process of home management 

a. Theoretical frameworks of process 

b. Family managerial patterns 

c. Managerial functions of different family members 

d. Identification of resources managed 

e. Assessing and allocating resources 



-29 
SUPPORTIVE PUBLISHED MATERIALS 



References: 



Bross, I. J. D., Design for Decision 

Cohen, J. B. & Hanson, A. W., Personal Finance 

Cushman, E, M., Management in Homes 

Fitzsimraons, C,, Management of Family Resources 

Fitzsimmons, C,, & White, N,, Management for You 

Galbraith, J. K., The Affluent Society 

Gilbreth, L, M., Thomas, 0. M. & Clymer, E., Management in The Home 

Gordon, L. J,, Economics for Consumers 

Gross, I. N. & Crandall, E., Management for Modern Families 

Hall, 0. A, & Paolucci, B., Teaching Home Economics 

Johnson, D, M., The Psychology of Thought and Judgment 

Katona, G,, Psychological Analysis of Economic Behavior 

Lippitt, R, , Watson, Jr., & Westley, B., The Dynamics of Planned Change 

Nickell, P. & Dorsey, J. M., Management in Family Living 

Starr, M, C,, Management for Better Living 

Updegraft, R, R., All The Time You Need 

Journals: 

Fortune 

Journal of the American Dietetic Association 

Journal of Business 

Journal of Farm Economics 

Journal of Home Economics 

Public Administrative Review 

Quarterly Journal of Economics 

Rural Sociology 

Social Work 

Sociology and Social Research 

Research: 

Bayton, J. A,, Psychological Research on Home Management Problems 
Davis, M, J., Decision-Making in Relation to Performance of Household 

Activities in New York State Home 
Proceedings of Conference on Values and Decision-Making . Dept. H. Mgt. & 

C. D., Michigan State University 



■■■>. 



-30 
TCRA (new course) 

66, (II) APPAREL AND HOME FURNISHINGS ACCESSORIES 

Materials, manufacturing processes, resources and markets of apparel 
and home furnishing accessories. Quality differences and essential selling 
information in ceramics, glassware, metals, jewelry, leathers, furs, plastics 
and furniture, 2 class hours, 1 2-hour laboratory. Credit, 3, Staff, 

Objectives ; 

To develop an understanding and/or appreciation: 

1, of the materials used in non-textile merchandise. 

2. for the manufacturing processes that provide quality differences. 

3, to be able to evaluate essential selling differences. 

4. of the resources and markets for apparel and home furnishing 
accessories. 

Rationale : 

This course is designed to acquaint the students with materials and 
manufacturing processes of non-textile nature in apparel and home furnishing 
accessories. This background gives basic recognition factors and quality 
differences in selection for personal use and is essential for the individual 
who anticipates being professionally associated with selection, distribution 
and promotion of these items. 

Outline : 

I, Furs: structure, processing, identification and classification, 
price and quality, construction, designers, government labeling 
regulations, care and factors affecting price and quality, 

II, Leathers: source, processing, identification and classification, 
care, factors affecting price and quality, 

A. Shoes: designers and manufacturers, lasts and sizes, 
construction, 

B, Luggage: designers and manufacturers, construction. 

C, Handbags: designers and manufacturers, construction. 

D. Gloves: designers and manufacturers, construction, 

III. Glassware: types, manufacturers, styling, structural and 
decorative processes, finishing, pricing factors, 

IV. Ceramics: identification and classification of types, materials 
used, processing and shaping, pricing factore r manufacturers. 



-31 

66. (II) 

Outline r (continued) 

V. Silverware: flatware and holloware - sterling and plated, 

manufacturing processes, designing, pricing factors, manufacturers, 
care. 

A. Other metals: Stainless Steel, Dirilyte, Pewter, Copper, 
Brass, Bronze, Aluminum, Wrought Iron. 

VI. Jewelry: identification of metals used, stone setting, finishing, 
costume and precious jewelry, designers and manufacturers. 

VII. Plastics: classification, manufacturing processes, styling, care, 
labeling, manufacturers. 

VIII. Furniture: furniture classification, wood types, other materials 
used, construction types, designers and manufacturers. 



-32 

SUPPORTIVE PUBLISHED MATERIALS 



References* 



Baxter, Wm. T., Jewelry r Geta Cutting & Metalcraft . New York, Whittlesey 
House, 1950 

Chambers, Bernice, Color & Design . Fashion in Men's & Women's Clothing & 
Home Furnishing a. Englewood Cliffs, N. J,, Prentice -Hall, Inc., 1951 

Chambers, Bernice, Fashion Fundamentals. Englewood Cliffs, N, J,, Prentice- 
Hall, Inc., 1947 

Gillespie, K., Home Furnishing. Englewood Cliffs, N, J., Prentice»Hall, Inc., 
1953 

Gillespie, K., Fashion Accessories. A Non-Text ilo Work Manual . Englewood 
Cliffs, N, J,, Prentice-Hall, Inc." 

Goldstein, Harriet, & Goldstein, Vetta, Ar{: in Every Day Life P New York, 
The Macmillan Co., 1954 

Hallowood, Bernard, The Things We See #4 "pottery & Glass". Harmondsworth, 
Middlesex, Penguin Book 

Nutting, Wallace, Furniture Treasury. Vol. I & II . New York, The Macmillan 
Co., 1948 

Taylor, Sally, Ceramics for the Table. New York, Fairchild Pub. Co., 1950 

Waugh, Sidney, The Art of Glassmaking. New York, Dodd Mead Co., 1939 

Wingate, Isabel B., Gillespie, Karen R., & Addison, Betty G., Know Your 
Merchandise. New York, McGraw-Hill Co., 1953 

Kates, H, G., Luggage & Leather Goods . New York, Luggage & Leather Goods Manu- 
facturers of America, Inc., 1948 

Manufacturers provide pamphlets, filmstrips, films, exhibits, demonstrators 
etc. covering developmental production, manufacturing processes, quality 
differences & consumer information. Trade periodicals are also excellent 
sources of current developmental materials. 



-33 
MFE (new course) 

74. (II) CONSUMER ATTITUDES AND DEMAND 

Study of the motives, attitudes and expectations of consumer behavior 
as influencing variables operating within and on the market. Prerequisites, 
Economics 25, General Psychology i, Sociology 25 or by permission of the 
instructor. 3 class hours. Credit, 3. Miss Merchant, 

Objectives ; 

1, To present market principles and problems through an analysis 
of consumer economic behavior. 

2, To study the motives, attitudes and expectations of consumers 
which contribute to the market structure and performance. 

3. To examine current research methods and techniques used to 
measure the autonomy of consumer behavior. 

4. To relate this study to the specified areas of foods, clothing 
and textiles and household equipment. 

Rationale : 

For many years, consumer expenditures were limited to the necessities 
of survival... food, shelter, clothing. Today, the role of the consumer is 
fundamentally different. Economic and environmental factors allow the 
freedom of choice., .the power of decision-making. The very fact that 
consumer demand depends not only on ability to buy but also, on willingness 
to buy means consumers have some latitude of action. It is this decision 
making action which is of vital importance to the distribution process. 

It is not enough to only analyze the results of this human behavior. It 
is necessary also to study the "why" of this behavior... motives, attitudes, 
opinions, expectations all influence actions, ..and thereby, what happens in 
and to a given market structure. 

Outline and Course Content ; 

A. Principles of economics and the behavioral sciences as they relate 
to understanding consumer economic behavior. 

B. Principles of distribution and forces within the market firm which 
influence the consumer in terms of decision, values, satisfaction 
and action, (Example: Advertising, grading, labeling, discount) 

C. Current aspects of consumer attitude and behavior as related to 
food, clothing and textiles and household equipment. 

D. Relationship of consumer behavior theories to the economic 
theories of demand. 

E. Internal and external environments which condition consumer purchases, 

F. Understanding the direction of changes in demand through consumer 
knowledge. 

G. Evaluation of current consumer research methods. 



SUPPORTIVE PUBLISHED MATERIALS -34 



References: 



Campbell, Persia, The Consumer Interest 

Cheskin, Louis, How To Predict What People Will Buy 

Clark, L, H. (Ed,), Volumes I, II, III, Consumer Behavior 

Hattwick, How To Use Psychology For Better Advertising 

Katona and Mueller, Consumer Attitudes and Demand 

Harvard University, The Tobe Lectures in Retail Distribution 

Katona, George, The Powerful Consumer 

Research Centers and Journals, etc.: 

American Economic Review 

American Marketing Association 

Federal Reserve Board 

Institute for Social Research, , .University of Michigan 

Journal of Marketing 

National Bureau of Economic Research 

Social Science Research Council 



-35 
TCRA (new course) 

76. (II) HISTORY OF DECORATIVE ARTS 

A study of style periods in historic context. Their aesthetic contri- 
butions. Emphasis on developments in western dress, furniture and furnishings 
Illustrated lectures. Study tours. Prerequisite: TCRA 23, or by permission 
of instructor, 3 class hours. Credit, 3. Mrs, Jarvesoo. 

Objectives : 

To provide students with: 

1, Comprehension of the characteristics of great style periods. 

2, Understanding of the factors that influence design changes, 
(Social milieu, intellectual setting, institutional forces, 
aesthetic needs) 

3, Insight on how clothes and furniture reflect the mentality and 
ideals of the age. 

4, Knowledge on how ideas migrate and how material things facilitate 
cultural exchange. 

Rationale : 

This course adds depth to the studies in textiles, clothing and 
related art fields. It adds to the student f s intellectual cultivation. 
It broadens her knowledge in history and makes learned historical facts 
more meaningful. 

Outline and Course Content : 

A, Introduction 

B, Antiquity 

Sumerian, Egyptian, MLnoan, Assyrian, Hellenic, Late Egyptian, 
Hellenistic, Roman 

C, Medieval 

Early and Late Byzantine 

D, Renaissance 

Italy, Spain, France, Tudor England, Jacobean, Carolean 

E , Baroque 

France, England, Early American 

F « Rococo 

France - Louis XV, French Provincial, England - Queen Anne, 
Chippendale, Colonial American 

G, Neo Classic 

France - Louis XVI, England - Sheraton, Heppelwhite, Adam 



-36 

76. (II) 

Outline and Course Content : (continued) 

H. Classicism 

France - Directoire, Empire, England - Regency, American - Greek 
Revival 

I. Nineteenth Century 

England & American - Victorian, Biedermeyer, Art Noveau 

J. Modern to the Present 

Scandinavian Influences, Eastern Influences 



SUPPORTIVE PUBLISHED MATERIALS ~ 37 



Referenced : 



Aronson, J. , The Encyclopedia of Furniture , New York 1938 

The Beginnings of Porcelain in China , Chicago 1917 

Clifford, C. , Period Furnishings , 5th edition, New York 1949 

Crawford, M. D. C. , One World of Fashion , New York 1955 

Drepperd, C. W. , American Clocks and Clockmakers , New York 1947 

Fossing, P., Glass Vessels Before Glass -Blowing , Copenhagen, 1908 

Gropius, W., Banhans, 1919-1928 , New York 1938 

Gorsline, D. , What People Wore , New York 1952 

Hartshorne, A,, Old English Glasses , London 1897 

Honey, W. B. , Dresden China - An Introduction to the Study of Meissen Porcelain , 

London, 1934 
Hunter, G. L. , Decorative Textiles , New York 1918 
Jacobstahl, A., Greek Pins and Their Connection with Europe and Asia , 

New York, 1956 
Joel, D. , The Adventure of British Furniture 1851-1951 , Toronto, 1953 
Kisa, A., Das Glas im Alter Funce , Leipzig 1908 
Maass, J., The Gingerbread Age , New York 1951 

Modern Plastics Encyclopedia and Engineers Handbook , New York 1950 
Mc Lear in, H. , American Historical Flasks , Corning 1953 
Pazawiek, G. E., G laser der Empire and Biedermeyerzeit , Leipzig 1933 
Pevsner, N. , Pioneers of Modern Design , New York 1949 
Rose, J. H. , American Pressed Glass of the Lacy Period, 1825-1850 

Coming, 1954 
Reade, B. , Regency Antiques , London, Toronto 1953 
Sirelias, 0, T. , The Ryijy - Rugs of Finland , Helsinki, 1926 
Steenberg, E., Modern Swedish Glass , Stockholm, 1949 
Truman, N. , Historic Furnishings , London, New York 1950 
Two Hundred Years of American Blown Glass , New York 1950 
Wyler, The Book of Old Silver - English, American, Foreign , New York 1953 
Yarmon, M. , Early American Antique Furniture , New York 1953 

Other References: 

American Art Directory 
Art Index 



Magazines : 

Antiques 
Arts 

Furniture Forum 
Craft Horizons 



-38 
TCRA (new course) 

85, (I) FASHION INDUSTRIES 

Organization and structure of the fashion industries in the primary 
and regional markets producing ready-to-wear and apparel accessories. 
Factors affecting the designing, production, distribution and consumption 
of clothing. Emphasis on the promotion process in fashion merchandising. 
Prerequisites i Marketing 71. 4 class hours. Credit, 4. Hiss V. Davis. 

Objectives ; 

1. To develop an understanding and appreciation of the organiza- 
tion for the production, distribution and promotion of fashion 
merchandise. 

2. To analyze the psychological, economic and social factors which 
affect contemporary fashions; to know and use the resources 
which deal with these factors. 

3. To gain an understanding of the special problems of retail 
advertising and sales promotion of fashion merchandise. 

4. To develop an appreciation for evaluation and selection of 
media, external and internal for promotion. 

5. To acquire an understanding of sales promotion techniques 
and procedures. 

6. To become familiar with the sources of current retailing 
data concerning market resources, contemporary trends in 
clothing consumption, retail advertising and promotion. 

Rationale : 

There has long been a need for a course in this area encompassing 
the many aspects of the fashion business. There are unlimited opportun- 
ities for positions in this field which are open to women who have train- 
ing in clothing, textiles, fashion and retailing. This encompasses the 
broad field of clothing consumption in our economy. 

Content ; 

1. General factors - psychological, economic and social, which 
affect fashion at any time. 

II. Specific factors - psychological, economic and social which 

are affecting the clothing industries today; which are affect- 
ing the production and distribution of fashion merchandise. 

III. Possible future developments in the fashion industries. 

IV. Organization of Fashion Production 

A. Styling fashion merchandise 

B. Place of Parisian, English, Italian designers in fashion 



-39 



C. American designers and manufacturers 

D. Government Production in America 

E. Export-import conditions and significant implications. 
V. Organization of Fashion Distribution and Promotion 

A* Buying fashion merchandise - regional markets 

B. Promoting fashion merchandise 

1, Advertising and publicity 

2. Ten basic steps in sales promotion planning 

3. Types of promotional themes 

4, Special purpose publicity devices 

5* Criteria for selecting media for promotion 

6, Evaluation and selection of media 

7, Fashion coordination 

C. Selling fashion merchandise 
VI. Development of Fashion Trends 

A. Fashion cycles 

B. Fashion Counts and Surveys 
VII. Fashion Resources 



-40 
SUPPORT IVE PUBLISHED MATERIALS 



References: 



Katona & Mueller, Consumer Attitudes and Demand. 1950-52 

Norris, The Theory of Consumer Demand 

U, S. Dept. of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, Monthly Labor Review, 

Changes in Modes of Living. Vol. 71, No. 1, July 1950 
Nystrom, Economic Principles of Consumption. 1931 
Ogburn & Nimlcoff, Technology of the Changing Family . 1955 
Barber & Label, Social Forces. XXXI, No. 6, Dec. 1952 
Hawes, Elizabeth, Men Can Take It 
Hawes, Elizabeth, It's Still Spinach 
Burris - Meyer, This is Fashion 
Byers, Help Wanted. Female 

Editors of Fortune, The Changing American Market. 1953-55 
Nystrom, Economics of Fashion 
Oglesby, Fashion Careers 
Biesanz, Modern Society. 1952 
Hamburger, It's a Woman's Business 
Lilley, Samuel, Automation & Social Progress. 1957 

Pollock, Automation: A Study of It's Economic and Social Consequences . 1957 
Ohrbach, Getting Ahead in Retailing. 1935 
Swinney, Merchandising of Fashions. 1942 
Wingate & Corbin, Changing Patterns in Retailing . 1956 
Bell, Daniel, The Great Back-to-Work Movement . Fortune . July, 1956 
Burck, Gilbert, What Makes Women Buy ? Fortune. August, 1956 
Hamill, Katherine, Women As Bosses . Fortune . June, 1956 
Saunders, D. & Parker, S., The Sunny Outlook for Clothes. April, 1954 
Burck, G. & Parker, S., The Consumer Markets. 1954-59, Fortune . August, 1954 
Cain, Gertrude, The American Way of Designing 
Chambers, Fashion Fundamentals 
Chambers, Keys to a Fashion Career 
Chambers, Color and Design in Apparel 
Crawford, The Wavs of Fashion 
Ely, Grace D., The World of Fashion 
Epstein, Beryl, Fashion is our Business 
Flugel, J. C,, The Psychology of Clothes 
Perkins, Paris Couturiers and Milliners 
Pickens, The Language of Fashion 
Pickens, The Fashion Dictionary 
Picken & Miller, Dressmakers of France 
Stevenson, How the Fashion World Works 
Warburton & Maxwell, Fashion for a Living 
Young, Agnes, Recurring Cycles of Fashion 
Form, W. H. & Stone, Mich. State Coll., Agri. Exper. Station Tech. Bull. #246, 

March, 1955 
Ryan, Mary S., Cornell Univ. Agri. Sta. Bull. #882, Sept. 1952 
Ryan, Mary S., Cornell Univ. Agri. Sta. Bull. #898, July 1953 
Ryan, Mary S., Corness Univ. Agri. Sta. Bull, #900, Aug. 1953 
Whyte, The Organization Man 
Maule, She Strives to Conquer 

Young, Charlotte H., Fundamentals of Fashion Illustrated 
Latour, Anny, Kings of Fashion 

Merriam, Eve, Figleaf - The Business of Being in Fashion 
Gateley, P. Ed., The Fashion Group, Inc., Your Future in the Fashion World 
66 Million More Americans. Fortune. August, 1953 



-41 
TCRA (oew course) 

93. (I) RETAILING FIELD EXPERIENCE 

A 7-8 weeks off-campus supervised and coordinated training-work 
program in a cooperating department store. Experience in selling super- 
vision or merchandising followed by evaluation of training, work expe- 
rience, leadership development and individual progress. Frerequisities: 
Marketing 71, Fashion in Retailing and Business, Textiles I, Apparel & 
Home Furnishing Accessories, and 6-8 weeks telling experience; or permis- 
sion of instructor. Credit, 6. (This course will be blocked in the same 
manner as the present student teaching course.) Miss Niederpruem. 

Objectives ; 

1. To provide an overall picture of retailing in a peak period. 

2. To furnish opportunity for training and work experiences in 
management in the area o0 selling. 

3. To provide the occasion for the development of leadership 
qualities. 

4. To allow the student to show individual progress in a work 
situation. 

5. To provide organized means for evaluation of training, work 
experience, leadership development and individual progress. 

Rationale : 

In this type of program the educational value is immeasurable. This 
type of course is supervised by University Faculty and the training in 
the work situation is done by qualified retail personnel and supervised 
by the Director of Executive Development in each store. Only large 
department stores who have well established junior executive development 
programs under the supervision of professional retail executives are used 
for such work-study programs. 

Current research supports the premise that work-study programs in 
colleges are the most effective type of background for development of 
retail executives and for more rapid progress in retail management. This 
type of program provides application of theory and also allows the students 
to bring back to the classroom valuable training and experience which en- 
rich their campus courses. 

Content : 

This course will be blocked in the manner of the present practice 
teaching program. The School of Home Economics will offer two courses 
accelerated the first six weeks of the fall term; then the students 
will be off campus from November 1 to December 23 (approximately). There 
will be a period for summarization and evaluation in campus classes at 
the end of the term. 



-*2 



During the training and work experience all students are visited 
by University faculty during the third and fourth week. Students report 
their progress by letter three times during their work period. A two 
hour conference is planned for each student in a store as well as individ* 
ual consultations both with student and executive supervisor* 

Before the students leave campus, they attend classes which prepare 
them for carrying out the objectives of the course. 

Topics: a* Explanation of training and work experience in management 
phase of selling supervision or merchandising* 

b. Ethics in retail store work. 

c. Professional clothing and grooming. 

d. Relationships at all personnel levels. 

e. Leadership qualifications. 

f. Leadership development. 

g. Individual production and progress. 

h. Methods of evaluation of training, work experiences, 
leadership development, and individual progress. 



immssm or. HasgAcaB's&m 

Usidergradua-te Coum 



$(m>M $0 CD* Miotic . vagctttar Plants 

Systematica, ecology $md £$ad«Be&£al if^orta&ce ©t static 

pl&sts as a-foed-aource for wildlife, 

Prerequiaites : Bot&ay I a&4 26 

2 3-hour claae -laboratory ^rio^ls Credit 3 

CIVIt OT1ME&X$35 S5, Water essd Iteate $?afc$r ..Ag)&l;reM 

An&lyaie of -«st«r relative to its quality for various domestic 
&xid industrial uses a&d analysis of waste water relative to 
its potest lallty of pollution. 

Prerequisite; Chemistry I and 2, 

2 ciaee botire, 1 3"=heur laboratory period. Credit 3 

CIVII. £!$XK£ESXBS 67. Og>ea Chataael Flow 

A study of eteadt? flow i« ©peia ehasseela iaaludtog backwater 
carves its natural sad artificial dbacysele # hydraulic j«^>, 
channel bend* and tscoaeiftieaa , sedimsat transport, surges aad 

*8imeQ, breatas&tera aad hydraulic structures. 
Prerequieiee: C»&« 75. 

3 class hours. Credit 3 

E1ECTRXC& SgKXK&E&IHG 78. Prlaclpfee of fftgitcfeiag, Ctt ;^#&, JX 

ISult i-tetnlaol ' «W lSriSQve circuits; circuit reliability; 
switching codes; technique*? la sequential circuit desiga 
vlth essphasis oa syaehroueus circuit*; treads is switching 



Prerequisite: &*K, 77. 

3 class hours, 1 3"k2sur laboratory. Credit 4 

mwmmz 36. <u> lr©iy^jmj«ajj^ 

Case analysis ®ad decision covering prieieg; tseeehaadise 
fiaaagesaent; buytssg end selling policieai stave ©ysteass 
personnel, acceun&inf control; ol&sst ogseratioa* 
Prerequisite; Har&efciE$ 53, 

3 class hours. Credit 3 

im$W& W (S). Onsen growth and l^lagMsa*; 

The groi?t& and ds&vel*3ps&n& of the child snd re&pessibtiities 
of narrlaga and really- living* Field practice is afforded in 
consgsiaity agencies. Credit 3 

FHYSICi 9 <md 9. Advanced Introdacfeagy. Jfeysics for ffeyalea.tteiags 

P0&TO61&SE 1 (!) 2 (21) 8lea»afesry . tem^uesa 

For students with no previous training la fortunes© . Inten- 
sive practice in the language skills* Ho credits is this 
course say be applied tcsmsd a degree vat 11 the close of the 
eacond semester* esce^t u^o® the speclel ceceBSBtfiadatioo of 
the Provost. 
3 class hours, leherti&oey. Credit 3 



z. 



fO*araig$g 5 (1) 6 (IX) mtw»iiatti goxtia&tsgae 

For student* vltfe o»fe y#&r of coll^g*. ^cvtugusse or equivalent. 
Training in tin® language skills; enpttaaia on apnofcing and under* 
^tending: v«a<Ud(|o is cultural dnd Xit;erary tests,, 

3 elae© aour® 9 laboratory* Credit 3 

as <x) a« (xx> ia£HipM®BJ^ 

Selected mus&erpiacea #£ Postugueno iifcarofcuns pmmnt&& 
integrally 9 in ltearaKjMbiiatorla&l perspective* Conducted in 

£©rtu$ue«e e ■ Clones scams tax stay &® elected indapandetftiy, 

Praraiela i&ea* Portuguese 5, 6» or u&rKlaaien of 

the departaant 

3 elses n»Br», Crete 3 

PUBLIC HEfeOT 9?, 98, Prcbleas 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MEMORANDUM 



FROM:. •9^?lS*?.9fCiS?. .• .DATE. ♦ .WfJUfT?.??. !?£?.. .• 

T0 Mr. Robert Doolan, Assistant Secretary 

The Graduate Council recommends to the President and Trustees the approval 
of the following new Master's degrees in the School of Business Administration: 

Master of Science in Accounting 
Master of Science in Finance 

Dfc-a^ Kirshen's explanation for reasons behind need for the new degrees: 

: 'Our M.B.A. degree is a general degree in Management. Very little 
specialization is permitted. But since we have demands from graduate students 
for some kind of specialization we have provided that a thesis plus greater 
flexibility in the selection of courses would be allowed. 

At the last annual meeting of the American Association of Collegiate Schools 
of Business a new set of graduate standards was established; among the items was 
,: positive statement that the M.B.A, was to be used only as a degree 'broad in 
nature and aimed at general competence for over-all management rather than towards 
specialization." Since we are members of the Association, and I voted for the 
resolution, we must now restrict the M.B.A. to our own general program and omit 
the specialization we now permit. 

This means that Accredited School?' of Business Administration that wish to have 
specialized programs, and most of them do, must grant an M.S. degree in whatever 
speciality is approved, i.e. M.S. in Accounting (or Finance or Insurance or 
Marketing and so on) • 

In line with this we recommend that our School of Business Administration 
be granted the privilege of awarding the Master of Science degree in any 
approved specialization. To begin, we should like to offer the degree in (1) 
Accounting and (2) Finance. These are areas in which a student can specialize. 
Later we shall add Management and Marketing." 

The Graduate Council has voted approval of the following new course: 

C.E. 257, TRANSPORTATION ANALYSIS AND PUNNING. - The analysis of traffic 
and transportation engineering problems in highways, railroads, and airports 
and the planning as related to those facilities; economics of location, 
of transportation facilities, collection and analysis of traffic engineering 
data, forecasting travel demands* analysis of vehicle performance in 
maneuver areas. 

Credit, J. 
Prerequisite, C.E. 19^ Mr. Boyer 



Gilbert L. Woodside 
Acting Dean, Acting Dean 
Provost 



! 



rOMMITTEE 



1 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
December 12, 1961, 10:30 a.m., Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston 



PRESENT : Trustees Healey, Crowley, Whitmore, 
and President Lederle. Also, 
Assistant Secretary Doolan 



Trustee Healey was elected Chairman pro tem in the 
absence of Chairman Boyden. 

The committee reviewed, in detail, the proposed candi- 
dates for honorary degrees to be awarded at Commencement, 1962. 
Suggestions were submitted from the Alumni Association, the 
University Faculty and members of the Board of Trustees. 

The committee was unanimous in the selection of candi- 
dates to be recommended to the Board of Trustees. 

The meeting was adjourned at 12 noon. 




tobert J/^ioolan 
Assistant /Secretary 
Board of^Trustees 



2321 



/^Ow« 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

INFORMAL MEETING 
COMMITTEE ON FACULTY AND PROGRAM OF STUDY 
January 12, 1962, 1:00 p.m., Student Union, Univ. of Mass. 

PRESENT : Trustees Haigis, Schuck, Brown, 
Provost Woods ide, Assistant 
Secretary Doolan. Also, Dean 
Niederpruem, Professor Goldberg, 
Dean Field, Dr. Redfern represent- 
ing the Academic Long -Range 
Planning Committee 

Due to the lack of a quorum, Chairman Haigis declared 
the meeting an informal discussion session. He called upon Pro- 
fessor Maxwell Goldberg, who is chairman of the Academic Long- 
Range Planning Committee for the University. Professor Goldberg 
reported that the Planning Committee has operated through two 
rather distinct phases. The first phase covered the period from 
approximately January, 1961 up to October, 1961. He said this was 
a more deliberate, composite, study period including reviews of 
books, periodicals, pamphlets and group discussions covering broad 
areas. It was a period of establishing the philosophy of the 
committee and they met from week to week with the deans and other 
administrative personnel. 

The second phase was from October, 1961 to the present 
time. During this period, the committee moved more vigorously 
covering such areas as the organization of the work of the 
committee. Dr. Leo Redfern, Director of the Office of Institu- 
tional Studies was added to the committee. Dr. Goldberg stated 
that the committee is working toward an interim report early this 
year in which the committee hopes to outline the broad approaches 
discussed during this period. The committee has established a 



COMMITTEE 



2323 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

division of responsibility among the committee members and position 
papers have been written and presented for discussion to the 
committee. Other position papers are being written and will be in- 
corporated into the committee's work. The committee is cognizant 
of both external and internal changes regarding the University and 
world affairs for both long and short-range effects. It is also 
aware of the educational relationship which exists between the 
various disciplines and external changing affairs. 

The members of the Trustee Committee on Faculty and Pro- 
gram of Study raised a number of specific questions which they feel 
quite important for the Academic Committee to consider. Some of 
these questions cover such areas as — what is the chronological 
development of the committee's work and the time period necessary 
for implementation? What about ongoing relationships during the 
period of time that the committee is operating? What about ad- 
missions policies and the relationship to the growing community 
colleges of the Commonwealth and the state colleges? What planning 
is being done in relation to the above colleges? What about the 
number of graduate schools needed at the University and the es- 
tablishment of these schools? What about the decentralization of 
the University throughout the state - perhaps through branch 
colleges and so on? What about the relationship of University 
athletic policy versus the academic philosophies? What about the 
problem of ROTC? What about the policies relative to the gifted 



student? 



The Trustee committee felt that there was a strong need 



for definitive answers and data to keep the educational leadership 



2324 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

in the Commonwealth. There are hard, realistic, issues that will 
come before the University in the very near future and the committee 
felt strongly that the University should be in a position to give 
positive answers to these issues. 

There was a discussion covering the general fields of 
activity of the Academic Planning Committee and in more specific 
detail the work of Dr. Redfern and others on the committee. The 
group also discussed many of the problems facing the University both 
in the academic and related fields. There was a mutual feeling of 
necessity and urgency in this matter of both short and long-range 
planning and the external pressures and effects on the University. 

Following the discussion on academic long-range planning, 
the representatives of the committee left the meeting and there was 
an informal discussion of the programs of study presented to the 



group, 



Dean Niederpruem presented the proposed curricula for the 



new School of Home Economics and gave examples and specific details 
of the philosophy and programming of the School of Home Economics. 
She outlined the need for the new curricula and the plans of the 
school for its growth both in quality and in quantity during the 
coming years. 

Following a general discussion covering many phases of the 
curricula and growth of the School of Home Economics, the committee 
assured Dean Niederpruem that they appreciated her plan and the needs 
of her school and felt that the proposed curricula would be an ex- 
cellent starting point for this growth. 

Provost Woods ide presented the background on the proposal 



COMMITTEE 



2325 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

for the establishment of an Institute of Agricultural and In- 
dustrial Microbiology. He stated that Dr. Warren Lit sky has been 
very active in both theoretical and applied research in the field 
and he felt that the institute would be an excellent means of ob- 
taining and organizing further research and development in both the 
applied and the theoretical areas. 

A brief discussion was held relative to the number of in- 
stitutes that might be established on the campus at the University 
and it was generally agreed that such means of organized research 
have definite benefit for the University. Should the number of in- 
stitutes grow to a sufficient size, they could be combined under an 
institute research program. 

Provost Woodside presented the recommendation to the 
graduate council for the new masters degrees in the School of 
Business Administration: the Master of Science in Accounting and 
Master of Science in Finance. The Provost outlined the basic 
reasons for the need for these degrees in addition to the general 
Masters in Business Administration and some of the philosophy be- 
hind it. 

The last item covered by the committee was the proposed 
new courses in both the undergraduate and the graduate areas. 

The meeting closed at 4:15 p.m. 





Robert /. Doolan 
Assistant Secretary 




326 



• 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



} 



COMMITTEE 



} 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 
MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS & GROUNDS 
February 16, 1962, 10:30 a.m., Univ. of Mass., Amherst 
Chairman Whitmore presiding 



PRESENT: Trustees Whitmore, Schuck, Pumphret, 
President Lederle. Also, Treasurer 
Johnson, Provost Woodside, Assistant 
Secretary Doolan, and other participants 
as indicated in the minutes. 

Chairman Whitmore opened the meeting by reporting that the 
agricultural land in South Deerfield has gone through the Council 
for approval. 

Judge Blassberg, legal counsel for land acquisition, 
summarized the legal efforts to date regarding land acquisition. 
He stated that the Commonwealth now requires two independent 
appraisals of all property considered for purchase. This will re- 
quire another appraisal for each of the properties now under con- 
sideration. 

Treasurer Johnson presented a comprehensive report on the 
status of the properties under consideration around the campus. In 
summation, the properties by areas have the following status: 

Area to the South and Southeast 

All properties have been appraised by Mr. Brody and the 
reports are on file. 

Properties purchased by previous Board of Trustee action are: 

1. The First National Bank property on North Pleasant 
Street. 

2. The DePillis property in back of that area. 
Properties appraised and may require land taking action: 

1. St. Regis Diner - due to a lease with the present 
tenant, land taking may become necessary to break 
the lease. 



2327 



Land 
Acquisition 



2328 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

2. Grandonico property (The Little Store) - a similar 
problem here with a lease to the Laundromat. 

3. The Paresky property - current asking price is too 
high and will probably require land taking. 

4. The Wright property - located in a back section 
west of North Pleasant Street is now held in name 
by Attorney Siebert of Greenfield - has a high 
asking price and may require land taking. 

Other properties appraised - no specific action at this time, 

1. The Webb property - a back piece of property off 
North Pleasant Street - has two lots - is owned 
by an elderly couple in their eighties who have 
requested life tenancy. 

2. The Fenton property - on North Pleasant Street - 
again an elderly person in her late eighties. 

3. The Donohue property - in the same area - another 
retired person. 

4. The Britt property - in back of Fenton and 
Donohue on Maple Street - they have asked the 
University to consider the moving of the house. 



Area to Southwest - All Appraised by Mr. Brody and on File 

1. The Tokasz property - approximately 11 acres - 
asking price very high - recommended for land 
taking. 

2. The Kraska property - same situation as Tokasz - 
recommended for land taking. 

3. Syzmkowicz property - recommended for land taking. 

4. In back of the North Hadley Road are three properties 

a. The Woynar property - looks possible 
for settlement. 

b. The Brown property - about 20 acres of 
land - looks possible. 

c. The Doleva property - about 3 acres - we 
have a 90 -day option for purchase. 

5. There are approximately 11 or 12 houses in this south- 
western area which have not been appraised. An in- 
crease in appropriation would be necessary to acquire 
them. 



COMMITTEE 



? 



} 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Area to the North - Appraised by Mr. Brody 

1. The Holmes property - about 16 acres - no 
specific negotiations to date. 

2. The Lamed property - about 9 acres - this is 
the property in which the Lutheran Church of 
Amherst has an interest. University action 
may depend upon decisions made with the church 
group. 

3. The Wysocki property - a large piece of property - 
no specific action to date. 

Following the presentation and on recommendation of Judge 

Blassberg, and on motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
land taking procedures be initiated for the 
Kraska, Tokasz and Syzmkowicz properties 
located to the southwest of the campus. 

Judge Blassberg will be present at the next Board of 

Trustees meeting on February 27 in Boston to present the votes to 

the Board. He will also check in the interim with the Attorney 

General's Office. Treasurer Johnson will proceed with investigatin; 

a second independent appraiser to comply with the new procedure. 

This appraiser will be presented to the Board for its approval. 



Proposed Gift of Land 

Treasurer Johnson reported that Mrs. Fred Wells of 
Shelburne Falls proposes to will 80 acres of woodland in Shelburne, 
Massachusetts to the University. The Forestry Department can use 
the land in its program. It was recommended that Treasurer Johnson 
suggest to Mrs. Wells a form of bequest that would result in the 
land coming to the Trustees as a trust under Section 7 of Chapter 
75 of the General Laws. 



/^•J -Xj *J 



Gift of Land 
from Mrs. Fred 
Wells 



2330 



COMMITTEE 



Inf ormat ion 
Booth 



Lutheran 
Church 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 
Campus Information Center 

It was reported to the committee that the proposed Campus 
Information Center offered as a gift to the University by the Class 
of 1961 was not approved by the University Master Planning Committee 
The rejection was based upon the need for additional funding by the 
University and also the need for more specific site planning. 

Land Requirements - Lutheran Church of Amherst 

Reverend Richard E. Koenig and Professor Carl Eiben, 
representing the Amherst Lutheran Church, joined the committee at 
this point. 

Reverend Koenig distributed a proposal to the University 
(see Attachment A) regarding the purchase of a portion of the 
Lamed property currently under consideration for purchase by the 
University. He assured the committee that the New England Synod 
plans on erecting a church which will be in harmony with the campus 
and are considering Pietro Belluschi of M. I.T. as the architect. 

Reverend Koenig and Professor Eiben were assured by the 
committee of its desire to cooperate with the churches in the 
Amherst area and that as a final decision must be made by the full 
Board of Trustees, no decision could be made by the committee. The 
Lutheran Church should receive an answer soon after the next Board 
meeting on February 27th. 

After the church representatives left, a discussion was 
held on the merits of the request. It was felt that the church 
presented a good case and has the necessary financial backing to do 
a good job. It was pointed out to the committee that the University 
Master Planning Committee recommended that the church be allowed 
approximately two acres at the south end of the property adjacent 



COMMITTEE 



— ~— 



2331 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



to the Montague parcel. 

It was decided that the committee would recommend such 
action to the Board if this decision on allocation of land is agree- 
able to the planning consultant, Sasaki Walker & Associates, Inc. 
The Secretary is to obtain this information prior to our Board 
meeting on February 27th. 



1963 Dining Facilities 

Dean Field joined the committee to discuss the recommenda- 
tions on the dining facilities for 1963 by the Committee on Housing 
and Dining Facilities (Attachment B). 

There was agreement on the need for the facility to be lo- 
cated in the present men's dormitory area and discussion was held 
regarding the best approach to the project by the University of 
Massachusetts Building Authority. Trustee Pumphret, as Chairman of 
the Building Authority, suggested that the facility might be con- 
sidered as project #3 by the Trustees and the Building Authority 
and that appropriate steps be taken at the next Board of Trustees 
meeting to authorize the University of Massachusetts Building 
Authority to undertake this project separate from the additional 
dormitory and dining facilities considered in 1964 for the south- 
west sector. 

Report of the University Master Planning Committee 

Professor Theodore Bacon, Chairman of the University 
Master Planning Committee, joined the meeting and presented a 
summary of the committee's activities. 



Dining 
Facilities 






COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mr. Bacon reported that the committee has met formally 
for twelve meetings since their organization in June 1961. Much of 
the work has been in conjunction with our consultants and has 
culminated with the report froan/whicn will be issued in the very 
near future. The planning consultants are Sasaki Walker & Associates, 
Inc. of Watertown, Massachusetts. 

This report is a preliminary study of our current master 
plan and projected thoughts for future expansion. Mr. Bacon 
cautioned the committee that this report is not to be considered as 
a master plan but as an evaluation of the present program and a 
projection for action in the future. 

h 

The consultants have recommended deviation from the 
Shurcliff plan in circulation for both vehicular and pedestrian 
traffic. They have also pointed out the need for the University to 
establish both educational goals and philosophy and enrollment goals 

Mr. Bacon reported, also, that sufficient copies of this 
report will be available for Trustees and University administration. 



Project Status Report 

Mr. Hugill joined the meeting to present the current 
status of building and construction projects on the campus. The 
committee reviewed with Mr. Hugill each project listed and 
discussed any problems associated with them. In summary, Mr. 
Hugill reported that the total report showed approximately 
$21,000,000 of completed projects with another $25,000,000 in de- 
sign or under construction. 



} 



COMMITTEE 



! 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Other Business 

As the Buildings and Grounds Committee can only recommend 
to the Board, and the final vote is established with the full Board 
of Trustees, the committee went into executive session for the pur- 
pose of discussion of proposed names for campus buildings. Many 
distinguished candidates were considered. 

Inspection of Completed Facilities 

The committee inspected the controls for the boilers at 

the Power Plant and upon motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
fc the Heating and Ventilating Controls, State 
Project U- 702-18, for the boilers in the 
Power Plant be accepted subject to correction 
of existing conditions that are on file in 
the Construction Engineer's Office. 

The committee inspected the new University Infirmary and 

upon motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees the 
acceptance of the Infirmary, State Project 
U-58-4, as completed in accordance with the 
plans and specifications for the project. 

The meeting was adjourned at 4:30 p.m. 




J. Doolan 
:ant Secretary 



««)i)0 



2334 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



/r 



STATEMENT 

The Amherst Lutheran Church, as it is currently known, is a project of the 
Atlantic District of the Lutheran Church - Missouri Synod, headquarters located 
at 2112 Broadway, New York 23, New York. The project, which aims to serve Luth- 
erans of all Synods under a cooperative arrangement with the other Synods repre- 
sented in New England, is under the supervision of the Rev. Victor Albers, Exec- 
utive Secretary of Missions of the Board of Directors of the Atlantic District* 
in consultation with the Rev, William Scar* Director of College and University 
Work for all Lutherans in New England. The Rev. Richard E. Koenig was called to 
carry out the project in 1$61 and arrived in Amherst December 1, 1961. On Janu- 
ary I, 1962 services were begun using rented quarters in the center of Amherst. 

The project as conceived by the Atlantio District is to be known as a "town- 
gown" church which means, obviously, that it is to serve both the students at the 
University of Massachusetts and faculty as well as townspeople in the vioinity of 
Amherst. Students at Amherst College and Smith College will also be served by 
the pastor and the church. Because of the greater number of students and faculty 
conneoted with the University, however, the new ohuroh will be oriented toward 
the University. 

In order to serve the University properly it is mandatory that the church 
have land in close enough proximity to the campus to enable students to walk to 
church. The Atlantic District stands ready to purohase such land for the ohurch 
when such is available. Following the pattern established in similar situations 
such as the University of Connecticut, the Atlantic listrict would then assist 
the congregation to erect a modem and fully equipped church. As in Connecticut, 
Lutheran congregations throughout the state have already begun gathering funds to 
assist in the Amherst work also. 

Representatives of the Amherst Lutheran Church are appearing before the 
Honorable Building and Grounds Committee of the University's Board of Trustees 
to discuss with it the possibility of purchasing land owned by one Ralph Larned 



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. 



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PAGE TWO - LUTHERAN STATEMENT 

located north of the present boundries of the University on North Pleasant Street. 

While Mr; Lamed has stated that he would be willing to sell the land to the 
Atlantio District* the Amherst Lutheran Church has learned that the Lamed prop* 
erty has been selected by the University for purchase in its expansion program* 
Members of the Amherst Lutheran Church did not feel that land included in the Un- 
iversity's program should be purchased without consulting the University* There 
is a desire on the part of all members to cooperate with the University and do 
nothing to jeopardize its future or make that future difficult* Accordingly, the 
members have agreed to abide by the decision of the University's Trustees in this 
matter* 

In attempting to oooperate with the Board of Trustees of the University, 
however* we would ask the Board to consider our request carefully* The State 
can not, of course, provide for the spiritual welfare of students on the oampus 
of the University* This under our Amerioan system must be done by the churches 
themselves* But the University would not be transgressing the wall of separation 
between church and state if it were to take an action whioh would enable the church 
to carry out its functions, pr«?M;d that the University's program is not compro- 
mised* Such action would be of direct and positive benefit to the students* 

We believe that the future expansion of the University to the north would 
not be hindered by apportioning all or part of the Lamed property for the use 
of the Lutheran church* In this particular area* the University has the poss- 
ibility of freedom in expansion more than in any other area* 

Accordingly, the Amherst Lutheran Church on behalf of the Atlantic District 
of the Lutheran Church - Missouri Synod respectfully requests that the Board of 
Trustees of the University advise it in the matter of the Lamed property* In 
the name of the District we on our part pledge to erect a building whioh will en- 
hance the over-all appearanoe of the University and maintain such building as an 

asset to the University's appearanoe* 

February If, 1962 



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-' - 



UNimsm OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Student Fersonnel Administration January 22 „ 19&2 

Committee on Housing and Dining Facilities 

TO University Master Planning Committee 

SUBJECT Recommendations for Dining Facility 1963 

We are glad to learn that it is anticipated that this building will be 1 seated 
between French and Fernald Halls. It will be primarily a facility for meal 
preparation and meal service « with 1000 seats and capacity to serve approximately 
2500 students . 

At the risk of listing some obvious consideration©,, the Committee offers the 
following recommendations and requests the opportunity to discuss these matters 

with the architect from time to time as plans progress? 

The dining hall should be designed (1) to meet . the convenience of 
the students whom it serves , (2) to provide pleasant and attractive 
surroundings ^here the practice of social amenities and tao?.e con- 
versation can be fostered and* (3) of course „ to provide efficient 
food preparation and sendee* 

It is recommended that the building contain a main floor and a 
lower floor. One central kitchen with three serving counters for 
lines leading to dining rooms of varying sixes for flifli^W-ity- in. 
use (occasional group meetings at meals , etc.)* Host students 
prefer rooms which are not large. Recommended s 

2. lines lead to 2 large rooms e 300 seats ©aoh 6C 

X line lead to 3 - k room® 100 seats > ... 

^0 seats] wali between' 
100 seats 
160 seats &00 

foST TOT seats 

Tables should be designed to permit conversation and social xn&er- 

cours©-=each table to seat 6 or 8 persons • 

Wooden furniture is preferred* 

Th® building should be air conditioned for satisfactory use throughout ■ 
12 months of the year. 

Entrance should b© convenient for pedestrian traffic from residences at 
northeast and southeast and from academic areas at west-. 

At each lobby entrance there should be convenient and adequate coat 
rooms c and rest rooms for men and women „ 

Traffic flow to three serving lines should g© from a central or single 
area to permit flexibility in use of dining rooms. 

Main floor to includes 

Central, kitchen with supervisor's office adjoining with telephone 

~ ' " and public address system 

assi 

Preparation areas (Continued) 



t'oom divider 



ftecommendations for Dining Facility 1963-Page 2 January 12 19»2 



Preparation areas including walk-in refrigerator at same floor 

■»MI . 1l. . ». K. H II » I1. . II«II H ill 1. 1 <■■ ■■» _ 

xevelo 

All areas must have ample aisles for traffic flowo 

(1) In kitchen - ovens 

broilers 
steamers 

(2) Off kitchen - vegetable preparation 

salad preparation 

(3) Off kitchen - dessert preparation 

Adjoining pot«washing area 

Main floor - or - consider lower level? 

A single dishw ashing area , either on main level or on lower 
level'* ' ' ''wiiirconveyor" 1 elevator • Lower level would minimize 
noise and confusion » 

Refrigerated garbage storage and garbage can-washing area* 

Lower level to includes 

Bake Shop - area large enough for 500° persons and expandable t© 
serve 10,000. 

To includes Refrigeration* holding boxes 9 

Rotating ovens „ proof -boxes * mixers , doughnut 
equipment,, etc« fi and dumb-waiter lifts to 
dessert preparation room,, 

Receiving area - Govered and enclosed loading platforms . 

m n *m» ; **m *tH mm ^Mi a n fat Hn wi w i im i>» 

Dry storage - for 1 month* s supplies . 
Refrigerated storage - for 1 week's supply* 

Freight elevator to central kitchen* 

Hegular esroloyees u dressing rooms , showers „ lockers 9 for men and women • 

■iniwiii— ■miwiwiwimiiiii in t{Mmimui\tnimm\-m*[tt\n\mammmmmftm\mwn*mTmm\i\nmnmm 

Student e mployees 8 dressin g rooms e cost racks , rest rooms,, etc* 

Fallout shelter planning, if directed by Commonwealth. 

Appended is a tentative checklist of equipment requirements which building plans 
should incorporates 



J 



Committee i 

Helen Curtis p Dean of Women* Chairman 
William Field, Dean of Students 
William Burkhardt^ Assistant Dean of Men 
Richard Jennings , M» D«, 0niv„ Health Service 
John F, Martin ( ; Manager , Univ Dining Halls 



■; ;■-:-:,;:.., 



Hood overall 
Roast Ovens 2 



"X-- 



stainless steel 



(Oas-Steim-Sleetrlc-Alr) 
(Condlt ion«4tfater-E£haust ) 
(Tile Walls -Light ing~Quar« ) 
(Tile Floor «Rouah in front) 
(of Fx»yera«Vent Fans-Fire) 
(Sal- 1 hers ""Emergency) 
(lightiag~Clocks • ) 



Fire Exto - Safety 



Racks? above « shelves below drawers 



Bang® - Flat Top 
Range - Grill Top 
Fryers 
Thermotainsrs 

Steamers 

Kettles - Stock «• Steam 

Kettles ~ Tilting 

Cook Tables & Sinks 

.Mixer Floor I^pa 

Mixer Table ?yp$ 

Slicing Machine Auto u 

Tender iser 

Scales Portion 

Patty Former (Burgomaster) 

in Open@rs 
Broilers ' 
lee Machine 

Hand Washing Sinks Foot Operated 

(k) Walk~in 'Refrigerators ~"Gb&f w/Freezer Dalxy-Vega -Freeser OutsMe Charts 
Dry Storage 

Dietitian's Office Supervisor Qffloe 
Janitor 6 © Room 
Time Clocks Reg, St'nd£ . 



VBOETABLE ' PREPARATION ARIA 

Potato Peeler 

Potato Peeler Sinks double 

Double Sinks Other 

Work Table Shelf BeloM 

Food Cvfcter Chopper 

Food Cutter Quaib&iei 

Refrigerator Walk-in Wall Chart 



STAINLESS STEEL 



i im wwi mux vamam p 



(Tile Walls-Floor) 
'^-xt nation) 



POT AM) PAH SIOOM 






JSS STHE1 



-..= : 



Pot and Pan Rack Storage Clean 

Double Sink 

Tables both ends of sinks 

Auto Pot & Pan Washer 

n and washing sink (foot operated) 

DESSERT PREPARATION ROOK 

Dumb waiters from leaver floor baksry 

Walk-in Refrigerator 

Work tables ample amounts 

Hand washing sink (foot operated) 

Double sink (soaking) 

Space for carts rolling equipment 



STA2SLESS STEEL 



■,. ■■ . .- 



Tile floor- Walls) 
(Lighting-Vent ilat ics ) 



iTlle Floor»WaU9 
(Light; * -Ventilation) 






SALAD PREPARATION AREA STA23HUESS STEEL (Lighting) 

(Tile ELooi^Wauls) 

Preparation tables * enclosed below (refrigerated) (doable sink) 

enclosed shelves below 
Free standing tables movable 
Can Opener 

Area for rolling equipment 
Area for Pantry (Dish & Tray* etc, Storage) 
Hand washing sink (foot operated) 

QKFEmOk - Serving Area 3TAIHLESS STSEL (Tile Floor-flails) 

Enclosed away from, seating area* (Lighting-Ventilation) 

Tile Floor 

Serving counter longer than present - dividing wall from seating area* 

Solid tray rail 
Cashier station (where) 
Cash Register 

Bain Marie (6 pan or ? pan) (hot foods) 

Bain Marie cold foods 

Milk dispenser station 

Ice Cream Cabinet (stationary or portable) 

Bread & Butter dispensing station 

Coffee Station (tea - cocoa - juice) 

Bun Warners 

Toaster 

Counter equipped with (2«3) shelf & sneeze guard 

Storage under counters 

Back of lines Pass through boxes (hot and cold) 

Wash up side close to each line (wall hung - foot operated) 

Serving tray pick up station (lowerators) 

Lowaratora Dish - Sauoar - Salad dish - Dinner plates - Cups 

Movable storage trucks Saucer - Salad dish - Dinner plates - Cups 

DINBlG AREA (Air condition* ) 

(Lighting « Ventilation) 
3 Line© serving 300 each (Traffic flow) 
Wood tables and chairs 
Water Fountain station (glasses) 
Condiment Station 
Silver Station 
Straws Station 
Napkins Station 
Planters Window Dressing 

Access from Dining Area to rear of lines and kitchen 
Djush return (Conveyors location ) 
Janitor service room or rooms 
Lobby Coat rooms toilet fac (Hen - Women) Terrasso floor 

D1BB ROOMS 

1 Central Same level as service or lower level with conveyors 

g^j^HQg! Refrigerated Can washer 

mZEWim AMD STORAGE 

»9t. mn: ft#JBT~" 

IMW Clean Soiled . 



"W mmu ■■■- .-.,-.».- 



I 



:OMMITTEE 



J 



2335 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF COMMITTEE ON RECOGNIZED STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

March 2, 1962, 1:00 p.m., Student Union, Amherst 

Chairman Schuck presiding 

PRESENT ; Trustees Schuck, Furcolo, Haigis 

President Lederle. Also, Assistant 
Secretary Doolan, Dean Field, Dean 
Curtis, Dean Hopkins, Dr. Southworth, 
Mr. Morrissey, Dr. Gage, Mr. Scott, 
Mr. Buck, Reverend Power, Rabbi 
Ruchames, Reverend Seely 

An informal meeting was conducted in the Colonial Lounge 
of the Student Union at the University. Trustee Schuck welcomed 
the representatives of the University and opened the meeting for 
general discussion by the various individuals representing the 
functions of student personnel activities on campus. 

Each of the people associated with the Student Personnel 
Services outlined to the committee, not only his basic responsibili^ 
ties, but also gave specific references to the problems and 
accomplishments of his function. Because it was conducted on an in- 
formal basis, there was opportunity for questions to be raised as 
different areas were discussed. ' 

Because of the comprehensive range of activities repre- 
sented by the group meeting with the committee, every phase of stu- 
dent life, other than academic, was covered during the discussions. 
A summary of the Student Personnel Services is attached to these 
minutes listing the functions involved and the individuals 
responsible for the performance of those functions. 

The meeting closed with mutual expressions by both the 
committee and the staff personnel from the University on the benefits 
derived by meetings of this nature. The life and activities of the 



2336 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

student body at the University is of great interest to both groups 
and through such comprehensive discussions many mutual points of in- 
terest were raised and explored. 

The meeting was adjourned at 4:30 p.m. 




i 




,<^l#M 



Robert, J. Doolan 
Assistant Secretary 



wtvsasm est tittSAorosBm 

H&eting of Xsrasfc®© Coaai&t«o ©a Baeasaised Stadeaf, Acs fritted 
■ Friday, Marclt a, lHZ t U00 p<,®> 9 Student ©aioa, U o£ H 



Sls^ly stated, all of the Student Personnel Semises aro dedicated 
to aiding th€? i&dfridaal dta^eat ia ais e£f oxts to oehiava tfee gtmtmt de- 
valopReati intellaettsel , personal aad eeoral, of v&lea &e is capable daring hie 
Uefrersity earner. Hi® es^erloaaee sac! ©pportunifcia© ©v&tlabl© to &sd* student, 
outside tba elasereea, should b© gsmsisteat tfith the basla goals of too Uni- 
versity ©ad saoald toroe as a sispplesseat to those of fete fom&l earrleale. 
Ibe en&ire castas enviroaggat in abieh. tbo student lives ©nowld eaeonrase tea 
nesitfra devnloposnt of Ms best q^alittes sad fcb«& acaiaveneat of sound valaes 
«ad tte ©stag© aecep&ane© of responsibility. Ike Stads&afc P©rsoaa<&l Services 
provide the professional assisfe&acsi go develop tfeis eavireaaeat as wall us pro- 
viding aid fta sees las pK^l&m ia personals giaaeaial, social ®m& aealta areas. 



/ 



HSH S S A » UOMW'S. AFFAIES 8®«a of <mmm, mim CmtU 

deaa of fttea, Saber* $<> Hopkia© & Jr. 

The ©sans of itean and of tte feave a eaapas-wlan concern for all 

©gn c s and mssa*® affairs as gall ass $tmt&iwg c®ans®iitg for individual eta- 
dents ia Elating taa raspeaslbilltias of ifaiv&rsity life* Xfeay ar& especially 
responsible for developing good liviag conditions, scmad program for social 
living, nai the eacoarageftsat of raspenalble govenna^at vlsaia the University 
residence balls. 



2. 



COffi^SS&XKG AKD CUH^KCB Mraetor, Bar, J« Mfrad Saativsorth 

Individual *£t2<teBt0 ara eaaaaragad through parsonal asanaaliag to 
dewlop seuad adueationai sad par-sonaX pines and in ovareo&taig any barriars 

or handicaps involved is £h@ir realisation. Spagialisatt testing end a&?ifc©~ 
aenfc sarviaes ara offered ia a aonfcinwsis fashion fr©si &ha pre-eollsge stnaex 
orientation program through the st«dst&t s g career on saspis in cooperation with 
the ac&dfsala divisions and ehs ethsir personnel agencies? 

II^SMIffi^&S^ Mreetor, Eehert J. Sfenrtssey 

Etaroagli the administration of p tegmm of scholarship and fisauseial 
aid s and tha opportunities of part*tte eopleysaat, individeal ©tsitots are 
aided in davel©ping their aim programs for smtissg the cost© ©£ $aiver©itv 
education. Ceig&sallag ceaeeraiag the dft^elGpsent of sereer pirns and job 
opportunities and requlroffients proceeds fro© tha initial ceBslderat&ea of 
gaols la these a^a^a throiggs the f laal placement interview for seniors. 

EH JB - - Director, m> Bob-art W> Gaga 

Bospensibiiity for th® ssainten&ae© of student feeal&i, hath physical 

and e&et&efi&l, throughout tha ccagnse , is hasad on tha individual relationship 

of each student with a physician and e&feands through a hroad e#uaati©&sl 
approach to tha gositiva values of §oa4 health to all arena of atud©»t life. 

^^^^^^TOBS e^rdinatog s fttUtfis B. Saatt 

She coordination of all atuclei& activities organised hy groups is 
pjaaned with consideration for tha ralationship of fchas® activities to a 
balanead ea^ua life. Tha facilities ®nd resources of tha gtndant Eaten ara 
a&ginietezed t© aid in tha aceeaplieliaent of this broad goal. 



Rgec©gixgg& $m$®m (mmifimiam, v&tm&ui M®§Mt s s^ws-d & Buck 

Xa eerzyfeg out the policies ©s&sfelisSiei bj the Xfw&msatZy Coaolttee 
en tesgsigg«I feudent Orgei&leatlea*, £hi* e€£i«e eseie&e gseiipe esse" thai* 
li&lvi&Mftl ffisss&«rs is developing @o«*&4 ergeaisetional e&A £isaae£Al procedures c 

«EL10I<»|ai ACIiyCT^IS Havareisd BmU J. Power, Ck^iala to Catholic Sttsdex&it 

Kg&bi trn-U totaag, Cheplaisi to jm?ish Students 
fiftreiMNBtf Mf?®ri> I*. Scaly, <&splaia to Protestant gtsgdssnts 

a® universlt* giv©s support to the religi©^ lifft of its student© 

in varices vagrst f.£ affords ftho e@& of Haters ity feoU&ties fox student 

groups of all faiths. It cooperates with the official ngencles of the three 

falthe ssoss im^ly r®i>r@©©afc©$ at the University by r&cogni&iiBg the contributions 

of theft privately supported ehepleias m£ by giving thg© facilities and 

privileges for th®i% work. 







2337 




UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 




1 


MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS & GROUNDS 
April 3, 1962, 10:00 a.m., Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston 




rOMMITTEE 


Chairman Whitmore presiding 

PRESENT: Trustees Whitmore, Schuck, Pumphret, 
Cashin, Thompson, President Lederle. 
Also, Treasurer Johnson, Provost 
Woods ide, Assistant Secretary Doolan 
and Mr. Nelson Aldrich and Mr. Axel 
Kaufmann from the architectural firm 
of Campbell & Aldrich. 






The proposed capital outlay program for the first five- 
year period was distributed to the committee. It was suggested that 


Capital 

Outlay 

Program 




the committee review the program and act upon it at a later meeting. 






The question was raised as to the student population 






figures used as bases for the capital outlay program. Mr. Johnson 




1 


stated that the following figures are the estimates used. (The year 




1 


indicated is the fiscal year) 

1962 - 7,000 1966 - 10,000 

1963 - 7,450 1967 - 11,000 

1964 - 8,300 1968 - 12,000 

1965 - 9,150 




1 


Mr. Johnson reported on the activity of the Deans and the 
University Master Planning Committee in forming the report. He 
pointed out that some delay occurred due to studies by the committee 
in areas related to the program. For example, studies and 
recommendations are being made toward a higher utilization rate of 
existing facilities. This will reduce the amount of facilities 
needed over a period of years. 

The second five-year program (1969-1973) will be pre- 
sented at the next meeting of the committee. 




II 







2338 



COMMITTEE 

Final Plans 
School of 
Business 
Administration 
Building 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mr. Aldrich and Mr. Kaufmann joined the meeting and pre- 
sented the final plans for the new School of Business Administration 
Building. They also brought before the committee the architectural 
sketches of the completed building and samples of a proposed 
material for the stone work - called mosai. This material has the 
advantages over limestone not only of range of colors and texture 
but can be preformed prior to being brought to the site. 

The bids for the School of Business Administration Build- 
ing will be placed so that alternate bids can be made using either 
limestone or mosai. This has been requested by the State Division 
of Building Construction. 

After the specific discussion on the proposed building, a 
general discussion was held regarding the use of Pietro Belluschi 
as an architectural consultant for the administration building, 
which is to be planned in the next stage, and the remaining complex. 
Mr. Aldrich expressed his pleasure and willingness to work with 
Mr. Belluschi and the committee agreed that Mr. Belluschi should be 
brought into the planning as soon as his availability and financing 
will allow. As the preliminary design and drawings of the new 
School of Business Administration Building have been approved at 
prior meetings by the Board of Trustees, it was generally agreed 
that the final plans would not be delayed for a consultant's 
suggestions. 

Upon motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED: To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the final plans and specifications for the 
School of Business Administration Building 
be approved as presented. 

Trustee Schuck was recorded as voting against 
the motion. 



2339 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Treasurer Johnson reported that the recommendation of the 
architect for the renovation of the older buildings on campus by 
the Board of Trustees has not been followed. Instead, the Coramissio 
on Administration and Finance appointed the firm of Munson & Mallis 
of Springfield. The work is presently under a hold order pending 
clarification of the appointment of the architect. 

On motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : That the committee protest the appointment 
of the firm of Munson and Mallis of Spring- 
field as architects for the renovation of 
the older buildings at the University. 

The Treasurer was asked to explore the matter further with 
the Department of Building Construction before releasing the hold 
order to assure proper architectural coverage of the project. 

The Treasurer requested the approval of a third appraiser 
to be used in the appraisal of land areas under consideration for 
land acquisition. He recommended that John F. Tehan, Jr. of Spring- 
field, who was recommended by Judge Blassberg, be appointed as an 
appraiser. The committee was given resumes of his experience and 
background for their information. 

Upon motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 

that John F. Tehan, Jr. of Springfield, 
Massachusetts be appointed as an 
appraiser on properties under considera- 
tion by the University in the town of 
Amherst. 

Mr. Johnson briefly outlined the properties currently 

under option or those that appear favorable for option. These 

properties will be appraised by another appraiser prior to any 

final action. He reported that further eminent domain procedures 

may be brought before the committee for their consideration at the 

next meeting. 



Selection of 
Architect 



Land 
Acquisition 



2340 



COMMITTEE 



Farm 

Services 

Building 



Other 
Items 



Stone & 
Webster Study 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 
Mr. Johnson outlined to the committee the proposed two- 
story addition to connect the present Engineering Shop Building and 
the Engineering Annex. This addition would replace the wooden farm 
service buildings now located to the east of the Engineering Build- 
ing and north of Goessmann Laboratory. They will be removed during 
the construction of additional engineering facilities. 

The proposed addition would also unify the existing 
structures and would be more in scale with the new Natural Resources 
Building being constructed adjacent to them. 



After discussion and upon motion duly made and seconded, 



it was 



VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees the 
approval of the site and location for the 
farm services building. This building is 
to be a unit to connect the present Engineer- 
ing Shop Building and the Engineering Annex. 

Treasurer Johnson presented a proposed study of fuels and 

power generation on the campus. He explained that this could be 

accomplished through an expansion of the current Stone & Webster 

study of coal handling facilities by the Division of Building Con- 



struction. 



After discussion and upon motion duly made and seconded, 



it was 



VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
a further study be made of the types of 
fuels, distribution of heat, generation of 
electricity, and voltage distribution on 
the campus be requested from the Division 
of Building Construction. 

The Treasurer reported that further meetings by the Master 

Planning Committee and members of the committee have been held with 

the representatives of the Lutheran Church of Amherst. The church 

is still interested in the Larned property. The Master Planning 



COMMITTEE 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Committee has discussed other areas for the church to consider but 
no final decisions have been made. 

The committee recommended that the University Master 
Planning Committee continue to work with the church group and explore 
as broadly as possible with them. Sympathy was expressed for their 
problem and it was hoped that a mutually agreeable solution can be 



2341 



reached. 



The meeting was adjourned at 12:45 p.m. 




j/Q*^ 



Rober/t p. Doolan 
Assistant Secretary 



342 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON ATHLETICS 
April 18, 1962, 12:30 p.m., Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston 

Chairman Cashin presiding 

PRESENT ; Trustees Cashin, Crowley, Healey 
Pumphret, President Lederle. 
Also, Treasurer Johnson, Assistant 
Secretary Doolan, Dean McGuirk and, 
representing the University Athletic 
Council, E. Johnston, A. Levine, 
G. Richason, Dr. H. Winn 

The Chairman called upon Dean Warren McGuirk of the 
School of Physical Education to present the material for discussion 

Dean McGuirk distributed a memorandum outlining the need, 
work schedule, and recommendations for the new football and track 
facility (See Attachment A). He explained the details of the pro- 
posal and emphasized the need for immediate action in order to meet 
football scheduling plans. Such scheduling must be made four to 
six years in advance and, as a result of this, the University has 
commitments to play teams during the next few years who will not 
play in Amherst on the present facility. 

A suggested amortization table was shown to the committee 
to indicate that sufficient funds would be available over a 20-year 
period to cover a bond issue. The facility would be financed and 
constructed through the University of Massachusetts Building 
Authority. 

Trustee Pumphret, as Chairman of the Authority, presented 
a brief status report on the funds remaining in the Authority's 
first authorization by the General Court. He felt that it would 
be possible to meet the proposed financing out of the remaining 
funds and that the schedule, as outlined, was realistic. He 



University of Massachusetts 
Meaorandua 



A 



Fro as University Athletic Council Date April 17, 1962 
To: Athletic Coaaittee of the Beard of Trustees and 



Mil *■!■ HI II Wi 



Meabers of the University Building Authority 
Subjects Priority Consideration of Football and Track 



Facility by the University of Massachusetts 
Building Authority 



edition of the developaent of the football and track 
facility is of the utaost importance. The urgency results froas 

1. The need to replace Aluani Field which will be lost 
through scheduled caapus developaent prior to Septeaber, 1963. 

2. Projected scheduling pattern is contingent on the known 
fact that a football facility with adequate seating aceoaaodations 
is under developaent. {Scheduling patterns are planned for a 4 to 
6 year period.) Such excellent institutions as Harvard, Dartaouth, 
and Rutgers have refused to play us at hoae until we can offer ade~ 
quete accoaaodations. 

3. The necessity of maintaining an increasing anticipated 
gate Incoae, 

4. Facility under consideration should be consistent in appear^ 
ance and utility with the high standards set for other caapus con* 
st ruction. This is especially desirable when you consider the 
location- -the first facility on the approach to caapus via 

westerly access froa bypass V 



5. Fira coaaitaent with Harvard University as dedication 
opponent for 



So The University Athletic Council strongly recoaaends that 
the University of Massachusetts Building Authority give high 
priority to the construction of the subject facility . Aaortisa^ 
tlon payaents will be budgeted in future Athletic Trust Funds. 



WPMsl 



Signed 



fa**A. if^ sn *±&M&L 



Warren P. He®uir& 
Director of Athletics 



' 



Tentative Work Schedule to Complete 

Development of Site (Plot #1) » Con- 
struction of Track end Erection of 
a 20,000«Seat Football Facility Prior 
to September , 1! 



1. April '62 • Landscape architect contracted to develop 

topography report and begin exploratory 
borings in area (Plot #1), 750* x 1275' . 

2. June '62 - Let Phase L to develop sub~drainage , in- 

stall pilings, lay water mains and sprinkler 
system, sewer line and construct track. 

3. October '62 •» Let Phase II. for the construction o£ 

the vest and east stands (steel), 360 9 
long and 40 rows high (19,200 seats). 

4. April '63 o Let Phase III. for press bos, 60' long 

and 18 '8'* wide, west stand facilities, 
dressing rooms, heating system, public 

restrooms, concession stands, etc, Under 
east stands, identical facilities would 
be provided with the exception of the team 
rooms o Hate and ticket booths would be 
provided in each of the four corners of 
the facility . 

5. Hay '63 - Cover gridiron with sod developed by Depart •» 

meat of Agronomy. 

6. July '63 « Let street and parking area contracts. 

7. August '63 • Inclose gridiron and stands with appro*? 

priate link-wire. 

8. September '63 • Miscellaneous signs, railings, flag« 

pole, relocate scoreboard, etc. 

A summary of the cost, exclusive of site development follows; 

Phase I. » Construction of Track Surface $30,000 
Phase lie » Construction t£ steel stands 

on both sides of the field 430,000 

Phase III. - Press box and facilities under 

both stands^ including ticket 

booths, etc. 160,000 

Street and Parking areas 30,000 

Sound System 6,000 

Lighting System 20,000 

Sewer Lines 6,000 

Link«wlre Fence (2) 12,000 
Miscellaneous signs, railings, flagpoles, 

grass, relocate scoreboards etc. 6,000 

"$750,000 



Highlights of Football ind track Facility 



St ad iu« Sltft ■ Located in southwest corner of University 

Campus* Plot #1. 

Parking - Parking area of 20 acres with facilities for 
3000 cars. 

Platens ions - the football and track facility will cover 

a total of 35 acres), of which the playing 
field will constitute 3% acres; the structure, 
etc*, to occupy approximately 6% acres. 

° 19,200 for football, lacrosse, track and 
special events. 

•A " $?$0,000 • Construction to be financed through bonds 
issued under the University of Massachusetts Building 
authority. Amortisation payment© to be budgeted in 
Athletic Trust Fund. 



Recommendations of the Football Facility Subcommittee 



It is fortunate, iu many respect*, that campus planning requires 

the abandoning of our present football facility,. Neither the playing 

area, seating, nor accessory facilities (tees* dressing rooms, toilets,, 
etc.) are adequate. Such excellent institutions as Rarvard, Rutgers, 
Dartmouth and others have refused to play us at home until we can offer 
adequate accommodations » 



The University Athletic Council has devoted considerable atten- 
tion to the planning of a new football facility . Our thinking has 

been guided by the philosophy that the structure should be consistent 
in appearance and utility with the high standards set for other campus 
construction. 

Since cost is directly geared to seating capacity, every resource 
available to the Council has been utilised in sin attempt to arrive at 
a realistic figure One of our basic premises is that it would be 
short-sighted to plan for any seating requirements less than those 
anticipated for 1972 in view of the necessity to amortise over a fairly 
extended period Cyet to be determined),, 

Our projected enrollment for 1972 is 17,000 students (1976 • 
21,000 students). The average attendance of students at home football 
games this past fall was 58 » 7%, with a high of approximately 60% at 
the O.R.I, game CHomeeomingl « It is reasonable, then to build for 
60X of I 7, 000 ■ 10, 000 students . this is a conservative figure, as there 
is every re as on " t> @~H@ 1 le ve that the level of student interest will in- 
crease as the quality of our football program improves, 

faculty and service staff will number close to 3 ,000 . It is 
estimated that 331 will follow the athletic teams. fhu$7 l»000 seats 
should he alloted. 

An exponentially increasing alumni following must be accommodated . 
It is estimated that by 1972 there will be 20,000 alumni within reach 
of our campus. A schedule that is becoming mere attractive each year 
should attract 10*»15X of this group to the campus, thus requiring (if 
wives, children and friends are included) t another 5,000 seats. 



A fourth group which we must accommodate includes friends of our 
opponent; residents of the Commonwealth who are interested in. the 
athletic teams of their University; high school visitors {we have an 
obligation as a State University to issue an invitation to home games 
to Massachusetts groups such as High School aeniors, miscellaneous 
service groups, scouting groups, school patrols, hospital patients, 
bands, etc. To provide less than 4^000 seats for such guests would 
be unrealistic. 



!a@&d on the above considerations, our firm minimum recommenda- 
tiea on seating is as summarised on the following pa$m% 



»2» li£««e.o<i^tMf of the Foot bail Facility $ub~Comml ttee - 2/12/62 



@r@*ip total Nuabcc lumber in Attendance 

Student Body 17 9 00® 10,000 

Faculty and Staff 3,000 1,000 

Alumni 20,000 5,000 

Other Groups «o.. — » 4 y 000 

20,000 

After investigation of the ©pacifications of football facilities 
at similar educational institutions, we are recommending unitized, 
solid-deck steal .stands* All seating will be placed on the 360 f t ■ 
sidelines, with the and*»sones reserved for future expansion . 



I 



COMMITTEE 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

indicated that the Authority would need an official request from 
the Board of Trustees before it could act on the project. 

During the discussion, it was decided that the pro- 
posal should be considered by the Trustee Committee on Buildings 
and Grounds at their meeting on May 4th and recommendations made to 
the full Board of Trustees at the regular meeting of May 17th. 

Treasurer Johnson reported that the University Master 
Planning Committee had reviewed the proposal and had approved the 
location of the facility. 

Therefore, upon motion duly made and seconded, it 



was 



VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees the 

approval of the football and track facility 
to be located in the southwest sector of 
the University campus and to further recommend 
that the Board of Trustees authorize the 
University of Massachusetts Building Authority 
to proceed with the construction and financing 
of this project. 

The meeting was adjourned at 3:30 p.m. 



_ 



~ 










i 



~oC 



__ 



Robert J. Doolan 
Assistant Secretary 



&0~TtJ 



2344 



COMMITTEE 



Land 
Acquisition 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS & GROUNDS 
May 4, 1962, 10:30 a.m., President's Office, U of M 
Chairman Whitmore presiding 



PRESENT : Trustees Whitmore, Schuck, Pumphret, 
Cashin, President Lederle. Also, 
Treasurer Johnson, Assistant Secretary 
Doolan, Judge Samuel Blassberg, and 
T. Bacon, P. Norton, L. Blundell, and 
H. Hugill of the University of Massa- 
chusetts Master Planning Committee 

Judge Blassberg reported that he had a letter from 
Mr. Julius Grandonico requesting consideration of partial payment 
if the University should take his property. Judge Blassberg stated 
that this "pro tanto" proceeding is normal and recommended that up 
to 60% of the offer for the property be paid at the time of land 
taking. 

Action on properties in the North Pleasant Street area 

was discussed and upon motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
land taking procedures be initiated for the 
following North Pleasant Street area 
properties : 

1. Grandonico property (The Little Store) - 

lot #57 in the town atlas. 

2. Barselotti property (St. Regis Diner) - 

lot #55 in the town atlas. 

3. Paresky property - lot #56 in the town 

atlas. 

4. Wright property, Willard 0. Seibert, 

trustee - lot #28 in the town atlas. 

5. The right of way between the Barselotti 

and Paresky properties. 

The above action will resolve all property action on the 
east side of North Pleasant Street with the exception of the Webb 
property. Due to the age and physical condition of the present 
owners, a discussion was held relative to the length of tenancy 
that could be allowed following any settlement. Upon motion duly 



: l 



COMMITTEE 



2345 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the date of June 1, 1963 be established as 
the terminal extension date for all 
properties acquired in the North Pleasant 
Street area. 

And, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
Judge Samuel Blassberg be authorized to act 
for the Board and initiate land taking 
action for the Webb property if present 
negotiations should break down. 

On other properties peripheral to the campus, a discussior 

was held on present options and those properties under negotiation. 



On motion duly made and seconded, it was 



VOTED: 



To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the following properties currently under 
option be purchased by the University of 
Massachusetts : 



1. Fenton property - 

area - lot #24 
under option at 

2. Donohue property 

area - lot #25 
under option at 

3. Doleva property - 

3 acres - under 

4. Bigelow property 

under option at 



North Pleasant Street 
in the town atlas - 
$16,400. 

- North Pleasant Street 
in the town atlas - 

$17,500. 

southwest of campus - 

option at $1,500. 

- north of campus - 
$17,500. 



I 



In addition to the above properties, appraisals and offer4 
are being made on the following properties: 

1. The Woynar property - 3 acres and possibly 

a house - south of North Hadley Road. 

2. Brown property - 20 acres - south of North 

Hadley Road. 

3. Lamed property - approximately 10 acres - 

north of the School of Education. 

Upon motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : That the committee authorize continued 

action on these and the Webb properties 
and that any options obtained between 
May 4 and May 17, 1962 may be presented 
to the Board of Trustees without further 
committee action. 



2346 



COMMITTEE 



Design 
Coordinator 



Extension of 
Sasaki, 
Walker & 
Associates 
Agreement 



Lutheran 
Church - 
Land Needs 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

A discussion was held on the proposal for design coordi- 
nation of University buildings from Dean Pietro Belluschi of M. I.T. 

The committee was unanimous in recognizing the need for 

the service and the excellence of the individual and upon motion 

duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
Pietro Belluschi be retained as design 
coordinator for all campus building programs 
to assure the appropriateness of solutions and 
their general architectural expression at the 
rate of $30.00 per hour ($15.00 per hour for 
travel time) plus expenses and mileage at 
$.08 per mile. 

The committee was asked to approve a study of present and 
future land usage by Sasaki, Walker & Associates to establish the 
bases for the future land acquisition program for the University. 
A preliminary report is to be due on May 15, 1962. 

Upon motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 

the agreement with Sasaki, Walker & Associates 
of Water town, Massachusetts be extended to 
include a land usage study of present and 
future University needs at the rate of $15.00 
an hour for Mr. Sasaki and the Executive 
Director, $12.50 per hour for project managers 
and designers and $8.00 per hour for drafts- 
men plus expenses and mileage at $.08 per mile. 

A brief discussion was held on possible solutions to the 
needs of the Lutheran Church of Amherst for church property near 
the campus. The church group has been trying to locate land in 
many areas adjacent to the campus but have been unsuccessful to 
date. Although the committee was sympathetic with the problem and 
the church needs, no further suggestions could be made beyond what 
has been proposed in prior meetings of the committee and in meet- 
ings of the University Master Planning Committee. 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Trustee Cashin, chairman of the Trustee Committee on 
Athletics, reported on the football and track facility and 
recommended to the committee that it approve the action of the 
Athletic Committee at their meeting of April 18, 1962. 

Following discussion and upon motion duly made and 

seconded, it was 

VOTED : To approve the football and track facility 
to be located in the southwest sector of 
the University property and to recommend to 
the Board of Trustees that the facility be 
approved as presented by the Committee on 
Athletics. 

1963 Dormitories - University of Massachusetts 
Building Authority, Project #2 

Trustee Pumphret, as chairman of the University of Massa- 
chusetts Building Authority, presented the final plans and specifi- 
cations of the 1963 dormitories, project #2, for the approval of 
the committee. 

Mr. Pumphret presented the following timetable: 

1. Approval by the University Master Planning 

Committee at their meeting of 
April 12, 1962. 

2. Presentation to the Board of Trustees 

Committee on Buildings and Grounds - 
May 4, 1962. 

If approved, the following schedule will be established: 



1. Bids to be issued - May 7, 1962. 

2. Bids for special contractors opened 

3. Bids for general contractors opened 

4. Award of contracts - June 6, 1962. 



May 25, 1962. 
June 4, 1962. 



Upon motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To accept and approve on behalf of the Board of 
Trustees of the University of Massachusetts the 
final plans and specifications for the dormitory 
project #2 as presented by the University of 
Massachusetts Building Authority - such project 
scheduled to house approximately 1300 students 
for September 1963 occupancy. 



2347 



Proposed 
Football 
and Track 
Facility 



Dormitories 



2348 



COMMITTEE 



Capital 

Outlay 

Program 



Sasaki, 
Walker & 
Associates 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Trustee Pumphret asked that the committee consider a 
name for Dormitory B of project #1 which is scheduled for comple- 
tion this year. A discussion was held and the committee was 
unanimous in selecting one person who should be recommended to the 
Board of Trustees at the May 17th meeting. 

The committee invited representatives of the University 
Master Planning Committee to participate in the discussion of the 
remaining agenda items. 
Ten- Year Capital Outlay Program 

A discussion was held on the proposed ten-year capital 
outlay program. Treasurer Johnson reported that the first five- 
year program will be submitted to the Division of Building Con- 
struction, then to the Governor, and the Legislature. The second 
five-year program is presented to the Governor to assist in his 
long-range capital outlay program. 

Upon motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees the 
approval of the ten-year capital outlay 
program as prepared and presented by the 
administration of the University. 

Sasaki, Walker Proposal 

A discussion was held by both committees on the short and 
long-range study of campus physical planning. There was unanimous 
agreement that an over-all planning coordinator will be needed to 
guide and assist in a development of a program of this size. 

Upon motion duly made and seconded, it was 



I 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
Sasaki, Walker & Associates of Watertown, 
Massachusetts be continued as planning coordi- 
nators for a progressive development of the 
University campus. The planning coordinator 
will undertake a continuing study of the 
University's needs and develop specific 
studies as required during the development 
program at the rate of $15.00 per hour for 
Mr. Sasaki and the Executive Director, $12.50 
for project managers and designers, $8.00 per 
hour for draftsmen, plus expenses and mileage 
at $.08 per mile. 

Inspection of Completed Projects 

The committee inspected the new Engineering Shop Build- 
ing and upon motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees the 

acceptance of the Engineering Shop Building, 
state project #U58-5 as completed in 
accordance with the plans and specifications 
for the project. 

The committee inspected the third section of the Morrill 

Science Center and upon motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees the 
acceptance of the third section of the 
Morrill Science Center, state project #U57-1, 
as completed in accordance with the plans 
and specifications for the project subject 
to the correction of items contained on the 
exception list on file with the Construction 
Engineer. 

The meeting was adjourned at 5:00 p.m. 



2349 



Engineering 
Shop Building 

Acceptance 




L^t^Ufyf 



Doolan 
ant Secretary 



Morrill 

Science 

Center - 

3rd section - 

Acceptance 



2350 



COMMITTEE 



Report of 

Investment 

Counsel 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FINANCE 
May 11, 1962, 12 Noon, Parker House, Boston 
Chairman Healey presiding 

PRESENT : Trustees Healey, Cashin, Brett, 
Hoftyzer, Pumphret , President 
Lederle. Also, Treasurer Johnson, 
Assistant Secretary Doolan, 
Assistant Treasurer Thaler and 
Mr. Herman Pike, representing 
Standish, Ayer & McKay, Inc. of 
Boston. 

The Chairman called upon Mr. Herman Pike of Standish, Ayer 

& McKay, Inc. who outlined the major points of his report on the 



University of Massachusetts endowment funds and operating funds 



in- 



vestment account. 



He reported that the endowment fund seemed to be well 
distributed at the present time and did not recommend any significant 
changes. He did point out that a cash balance of approximately 
$8,100 has been accumulated and recommended that it be invested. 

Upon motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED ; To authorize the Treasurer, Kenneth W. 
Johnson, to invest $8,000 of the cash 
balance accumulated in the endowment 
fund in U.S. Treasury notes 3\ of 
2/15/63. 

Mr. Pike then discussed with the committee the investment 
program for the Operating Fund Account. He suggested that the 
committee consider such investments as time certificates in 
commercial banks or the program established for charitable and non- 
profit institutions by the Morgan Guaranty Company. 

A discussion was held on the amount and spread of funds 
in savings banks at the present time. An amount of $474,919 is 
currently on deposit in four banks as follows: 



COMMITTEE 



J 



ted 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Easthampton - $70,000 
Ware - $115,411.16 
Woronoco - $99,837.57 
Amherst - $188,799.24 

The rest of the funds are invested in U.S. treasuries. 

A redistribution of the savings bank funds was suggested 
with a possible $50,000 limit per bank. It was further sugges 
that Boston and other city banks be considered for investment. The 
committee felt that the accounts should remain with Massachusetts 
banks. A gradual program of reduction would be instituted with the 
present banks to bring them down to the $50,000 limit. 

As a result of the discussion, it was agreed that a new 
schedule would be formulated subject to the Finance Committee and 
Board of Trustees' approval. This would assure some flexibility 
with Massachusetts banks with approximately $500,000 to be on 
deposit in savings banks. Other funds could be established on time 
deposits in commercial banks and in U.S. treasuries. The schedule 
would incorporate a reasonable time schedule to reduce the present 
savings bank deposits to the $50,000 amount. This schedule will be 
presented at the next committee meeting on Finance. 

Treasurer Johnson pointed out that a contract should be 
drawn up for Mr. Pike. The committee agreed that such a contract 
should be made and presented for committee and board approvals. 

Treasurer Johnson reported that the Fruit Growers Associa- 
tion has raised the funds needed to purchase the Belchertown property 
and that the proposed trust agreement has been approved by the 
Attorney General's Office. 

A discussion was held regarding whether the deed should 
be drawn up by the Fruit Growers Association giving the property to 



2351 



Proposed Trust 
Agreement with 
Massachusetts 
Fruit Growers 
Association 



2352 



COMMITTEE 



State 

Auditor's 

Report 



Use of Un- 
restricted In- 
terest Income 
on Trust Funds 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 
the Commonwealth or to the Board of Trustees of the University. 

It was agreed that in order to carry out the trust agree- 
ment and to insure more flexibility in the future, and as other 
properties have been so deeded, that the deed be drawn to the 
Board of Trustees. The Fruit Growers Association should draw up 
the deed in this way and accompany it with a letter outlining the 
gift of the property to the Board of Trustees of the University of 
Massachusetts . 

Upon motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees the 
acceptance of the trust agreement with the 
Massachusetts Fruit Growers Association as 
presented in Attachment A to these minutes. 

The Treasurer presented a report to the committee 
(Attachment B) outlining the actions that have been taken since the 
report of the State Auditor for the period July 1, 1960 to June 30, 
1961 had been received. 

Treasurer Johnson presented a request for expenditures to 
be authorized from unrestricted interest income on trust funds. 

Following discussion and upon motion duly made and 

seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 

expenditures be authorized from Unrestricted 
Interest Income on Trust Funds as follows: 

1. For scholarships to students as determined 
by the faculty committee on scholarships 
and financial aid - $11,000. 

2. For the printing and distribution of the 
President's Report and other reports, 
brochures and studies authorized by the 
President - $6,000. 

3. For the use of the President in the 
furtherance of the University's program - 
$2,000. 



! 



COMMITTEE 



J 



J 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

A proposal was presented to the committee for a change in 
the deposit accounts currently in operation by the University. The 
change will affect those accounts operated for the safe-guarding of 
student cash. It was suggested that such student accounts be dis- 
continued due to the extra staffing and equipment needed and that 
the local banks be utilized for this service. 

After discussion, the committee felt that such accounts 
are needed for a number of students for whom checking accounts woul< 
not be feasible and that the student accounts be continued as an 
aid and assistance for the relatively large number of students 
using the service. 
Other Business 

1. Insurance - Alumni Memorial Building 

Treasurer Johnson read a letter from Blair and 
Cutting Insurance Agency of Amherst proposing that the 
University convert the insurance on the Alumni Memorial 
Building to the form of the public and institutional 
property insurance. This program provides a larger 
limit of coverage and includes fire, lightning, 
vandalism and extended coverage for a relatively 
small increase in premium. A quarterly inspection 
of the property would be required which could be 
accomplished by current University personnel. 

Members of the committee familiar with this form 
of coverage recommended its adoption as it does pro- 
vide better protection at a reasonable rate. 

Upon motion duly made and seconded, it was 



2353 



Student 
Deposits 



Alumni 

Memorial 

Building 



«dt)T 



COMMITTEE 



ROTC 

Military 
Property 
Bonds 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED ; To recommend to the Board of Trustees 

that the Treasurer, Kenneth W. Johnson, 
be authorized to obtain the public and 
institutional property form of insurance 
for the Alumni Memorial Building. 

2. Army - Air Force ROTC Military Property Bonds 

The Treasurer read a request to the Board to in- 
crease the military property bonds for ROTC from the 
present $11,000 to $23,000 to cover Air Force ROTC 
property. 

Upon motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED: To recommend to the Board of Trustees 

that the Treasurer, Kenneth W. Johnson, 
be authorized to execute the Army - 
Air Force ROTC Military Bonds for 
$23,000. 

The meeting was adjourned at 3:15 p.m. 








1&^s 



J. Doolan 
ant Secretary 



] 



COMMITTEE 



] 



J 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON 
FACULTY AND PROGRAM OF STUDY 

June 1, 1962, 11:00 a.m., Student Union, Amherst 

Chairman Haigis presiding 

PRESENT: Trustees Haigis, Crowley, Schuck 
and President Lederle. Also, 
Provost Woods ide, Assistant 
Secretary Doolan, and Dean Albert 
Purvis, School of Education. 

Provost Woods ide presented the prospectus for an Institute 
of Environmental Psychophysiology and the function of the Institute 
and its organization. The committee discussed the purpose and 
philosophy of the proposed Institute and the other institutes 
already established at the University and recommended a change in 
Section II entitled Organization to assure Board approval of the 
Director of the Institute. 

Upon motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 

an Institute of Environmental Psychophysiology 
be established at the University of Massachu- 
setts as proposed in Attachment A to these 
minutes. 

The recommendations of the University Course of Study 
Committee were considered by the Trustee committee. Provost Wood- 
side reported that one section in the report regarding the classi- 
fication of Geography was rescinded by vote of the University 
committee. 

In the discussion of the recommendations, the committee 
agreed that a specification for television courses should be tabled 
until such future time when it may be applicable. 

In a discussion on the proposed POLICIES AND PROCEDURES 
CONCERNING CHANGES IN UNDERGRADUATE CURRICULA AT THE UNIVERSITY OF 



2355 



Institute of 
Environmental 
Psycho- 
physiology 



University 
Course of 
Study 
Committee 



2356 



COMMITTEE 



Recommendat ions 
of the Univer- 
sity Graduate 
Council 



Certificate 
of Advanced 
Graduate 
Study 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MASSACHUSETTS, the committee agreed that the words "if recommended" 

in the last sentence of paragraph I-B-a be deleted. 

With these changes and upon motion duly made and 

seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
to approve the additions, changes and 
deletions to the undergraduate program 
of study and the policies and procedures 
concerning changes in undergraduate 
curricula at the University of Massachu- 
setts as outlined in Attachment B to 
these minutes and made a part of these 
minutes. 

The Provost presented the recommendations of the Univer- 
sity Graduate Council. 

Following discussion and upon motion duly made and 

seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 

to approve the graduate courses as out- 
lined in Attachment C to these minutes 
and made a part of these minutes. 

Dean Purvis discussed the proposed Certificate of 
Advanced Graduate Study for the School of Education with the 
committee. He said that the certificate will meet a definite need 
for advanced study programs in specific areas and that similar 
programs can be found throughout the country. 

Dean Purvis pointed out that such programs will replace 
the haphazard approach to further study that occurs when formal 
programs are not available. 

There was a general discussion of advanced degree pro- 
grams and the advanced study certificate program regarding their 
philosophy and purposes. 



COMMITTEE 



2357 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Upon motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 

the approval of the proposed program for 
the Certificate of Advanced Graduate Study 
within the School of Education in 
accordance with Attachment D to these 
minutes . 

The committee held an informal discussion of future 
academic goals, programs of study, disciplines, and similar areas 
in which a broad range of ideas were explored. 

The meeting was adjourned at 3:00 p.m. 





iU^o 



J. Doolan 
nt Secretary 



OO 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



A 



Prospectus far an institute of Environmental Psycho-physiology 



I. Purpose j Within the Department of Psychology there is being carried out 
an extended program of research on the psychophysiological effects of 
environmental and operational stresses • This research is currently being 
supported by grants from the fSatienal Science Foundation, l&tional in- 
stitute of Health, Air Force Office of Scientific Research and a contract 
with the Electronic Systems Division of the Mr Fos-c© Research and De- 
velopment Cosasand. The nature of the work is such as to have broad i«apli« 
cations to a variety of applied ^refrtsms #ud h^s led te- expressions of in- 
terest from the aero-space and communications industries as wall as fro© 
non-profit ageneies concerned with the public health end tsalfare. A 
number of informal inquiries have been made concerning problems of mutual 
interest and the possibility of axpanding th<a program to include related 
problems of both general and specific concern to these agencies and 
industries . 

The University has been limited in its ability to carry out such vork be- 
cause of the lack of research and service personnel with time assignable 
for it* In addition, because the research has important interdisciplinary 
aspects, it would be desirable to have assistance from specialists both 
within and outside of psychology* To overcome these limitations, technicians 
and research associates could be hired who would pxw?i$& the desired 
assistance and contribute to a taasb&s o£ projects . It is proposed that this 
be accomplished through' an "Institute of Environmental fgychophysiology" as 
a Tgrnst Fund of the University. 

II. Organisation; The "Institute'* will be responsible to the Head of the 
Department of Psychology, and in turn to the Dean of the College of arts 
and Sciences and the Provost.* A Director of the Institute who should be 

a msmber of the faculty of the University #111 be nominated by the President 
for recommendation to the Beard ©I Trustees of the university. An advisory 
coffl&ifctee will be appointed by the President consisting ef members of the 
University administration, faculty and representatives from appropriate 
industries and non-profit agencies. This committee shoald meet periodically 
with the Director, Head of the department of Psychology f Bean of the 
College of Arts and Sciences, University Treasurer and Provost to review 
policies of the Institute and make recommendations* 

All grants and contracts entered into by the Institute will be approved 
by the Treasurer and Provost of the University* All actions of the In- 
stitute will be subject to review by the University Eeseareh Council which 
may make recommendations to the University Administration* 



* When a new Bean of the Graduate School and Coordinator of Research is 
appointed, it may be desirable- to reconsider and modify this line of 



! 

kscmtrs In support oi i resea 

t,iviiies of the J««i t be such aa tc emphasise ' 

3 rath©] ;han applied reseat ; ohlema Am 
pi 

m :- que fi r ■ and i i i not 

at ' i tried 

Lvat* :.■....:. . Lei In the Cocunoj'sweait 

be oi suoh s e 

iture, 

. . ■ ■ . • Lti i i I 

id from paying erhead 

.. il r-i ts, ; ' ' ' b 1 s <h« Tj - ■ 

' ! i r<e d 

* 

.- 

s te 

. ow 

d 

to i ' si t-ji 

- 

dtlees* - rosea 

,ariee of all personrM the 

v .: ;w the Institute 

alary wfe 
i at a rate consistent v . versity pc 

ed at a 

... a - ..s- fe3 '--*<> 

Trie pc 

, d expansion in 

s-f 30 • with I ors en?:. 

' i g and 

; , , . the fundamental res* ■■ the 

j« rsseftf'. tentlsts to " 
do 3 sistanoe to graduate st ; . 

baneewnt of the research reputation of the 
will aid traeting high quality g ate students and sUi 



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it tm» e&# apf>»sppvis£« fa!Mtm&@ Mm * ^m> will f@t@^ 

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fg^)@@a^ £<»« ^^ ©®ysrs^« ^^*1^ iselie^s 



€®^g®@ (Si«eripti®B Halted to 25 ^«^a)o 



2. 

<2) Baserrlpfcivo ©aterisl including ck© isajosr topics to bo con- 
sidered .in the course* the type of published is&terials 
available to support tfee course* tfce c«&£££eash&$ ©£ the 
proposed course tee tee progress of tls© sghoSl ©r deparfc&eafc 

and the peograsa of other schools or depattsasnts, sad to 
courses offered t&rougn €&e £©ur~eelleg© plan. 

0) la subsisting new curriesiusj. aS new course proposals to tfce 
Provost, the Acadeeric Beans snail forward 25 colics ©& (he 
proposal to the Provost *«t$o will ifcr^ard one copy to each 
Academic Bean. At the discretion of the Bean, such proposals 
ssay be discussed with the Curriculum CosiB&bfsee ef the 
respective College ©r Safes©! • In any ©vgat a tee fieee is to 
have three ^ecks la ss&ich to ^©£nt out to the Provost any 
evidence of possible duplication of e©um© content or t© 
register any other Objection so the proposals* 

c» Proposed cUfioges of a ©inor eat«ee 9 such as tbe nes&ering ©£ 
courses or the semester in $aien the coarse is of £©£©d 9 shall 
be determined by the Been c£ the College or School in consultation 
uith Che Scheduling and Bscosds offices. A tsas05?aifcdu& of the 
action shall fee seat to tae Provost* 

d* The Provost shall tsaintain a file of proposed eussieulun casnges 

sfoich shall fee available tor inspection. 

XI, Undergraduate Course of Study CoooittQa 

A, Qegbessfiip of the Coisaittee 

Tim coiaa&ttee sbell consist of esse rep resentative £re© the Curriculum 
Coisaittc© of eacli College or Sefo0©l» {istclttdftag tbe Division of Military 
end Air Science) except tfeafc tkera shall be t&sree representatives from 
ta© College eg Arts and Sciences. 

B» Prsse of Befereese o£ tbo €oaBlt£es 

e* 35ae function of ttm !?nd8rg$aduate Cta&se o£ Study CosEsitfce© shall 
be to advise the President ©a tSte University Cfsre Curriculum and 

to reecssaend criteria and preee-teea £or adopting or deleting 
individual courses £©r rzajssr sequences ©£ study. 2£ts recesseada- 

tioas snail bo referred to felse President via £h& Provost (wlie 
shall serve as Chslsataa ©£ tke Concaittee) £or transmittal to the 
Trustee Cesmlffcee en Fs-^ulty ass'i Pssegren o£ SSasdy, 

fe a Altaeugli tit© Acades&e Saans ami toe Frovost ore caarged «>ith 
seeing tliat 3Jniwrs!£^ poliey uitn respect to the curriculum 
is carried out s t&e CoEs^ttce snail revlewj, on request, pwsblesas 

related t© the curriculusi, 



3. 



c. praccifcires 

c» She Cossaifctee shall fietfe responsibility for jsQ9$jom$s% the 

tfoiverelty Cora Stt2Ticalusa r ^c3ifioS£€aIty &ce& ssek&ag cceonsEottda- 
tSone for aecdedl revisions ♦ £>ttcb EecossKmdfatieass saist bo 
sttelt&ecS to the Heart a£ each College an£ School for submission 
to «aapeefcin»a Cug££celara Cosffiitteeo before* being EceofflKca&eti 
co t&e prcsidecfc. 

b. Sac PEcvoafc aay re£er aunvicular matters to tit© Sftcgorgsraduate 
Course of study CoEslttee Seas advice tot sasll have the 
responsibility £ov fifee acceptance or rejectees o£ cay proposal 
for seba£sslen to the President and Xees&ae Goas&fcfcee ee Fealty 
ciul Drograsi of StadSy for approval, 

c. Acr? faculty seizes oay call to tec atteafcicii of the Undergraduate 

Coarse or" gtedy Committee, through the Pwnrosu, aay catfcer 
concerning the curriculum i&&ea he feels atsoeld fee eoaaide£ee , « 

d. £n order to pvottide mi e£££c£al centralised record of curriculum 

actions by the AaadeaSs Scene and by the Provost?, all each 
changes are to be read lege tit© record ang &&clttdgd as? part of the 
iplnutee of the meetings of; the Coasgittee* 

XIX. Beard <o£ l&ustccs 

All- tsajor casricular ©attcrs %&£cSi £ne been approved by tae Ssovoat and 




Sfcasteee w&esa approval £9 accessary ror any staler modification e£ the 
corricnlusa* 



Approved by vote ©£ University Ccssr&a o£ Stagy Ctosssifrtee, A$r£l 13 9 1962. 
Approved by university Faculty Senate 5, Hey 24, 1982, 



<L 



UNIVERSITY OP MASSACHUSETTS 

MEMORANDUM 

From: Graduate Office Date* May 17 > 1962 

To: Mr* Robert Doolan, Acting Secretary of the University 

The Graduate Council recommends to the President and Trustees the approval 
of a new graduate program in Education leading to the Certificate of Advanced 
Study. (See attachment) 

The Graduate Council has voted approval of the following new courses subject 
to approval by the University of Massachusetts Board of Trustees: 

CHEMISTRY 

Chemistry 238, BIOCHEMISTRY OF PROTEINS. -A discussion of the chemical, 
physical, and biological properties of . proteins. Credit, 3. 

Prerequisite, Chemistry 19li and 166. Mr. Little. 

GOVERNMENT 

Government 200, SPECIAL PROBLEMS, Credit, 1-6 

The Staff 

Government 293, SEMINAR ON THE GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS OF SOUTH ASIA.- 
Intensive study of selected problems relating to the government and politics 
of India, Pakistan, and Ceylon. Credit, 3. 

Mr. Sayeed. 

HISTORY 

History 209, CONTEMPORARY LATIN AMERICAN HISTORY.-A study of major movements 
since about 1930 with attet&ion directed to the political, economic, social, 
and ideological forces contributing to change. Reading knowledge of Spanish 
or Portuguese is desirable but not required. 
Three class hours. Credit, 3. 

History 210, EARLY MEDIEVAL HISTORY. -Continuity between ancient and 
medieval civilization,. 

Prerequisites, working knowledge of Latin and one modern language (German, 
French, Italian) or by special permission of the instructor. 
Three class hours. Credit, 3. 

History 211, THE AGE OF THE RENAISSANCE AND REFORMATION. -A study of 
European culture between lUOO and 1600. A reading knowledge of a modern 
European language is generally required. 
Three class hours. 

Credit, 3. 

History 212, TOPICS IN THE AGE OF THE ENLIGHTENMENT, -The movement of 
ideas in Atlantic Civilization during the 18th century. Study of the 
mind and writings of representative European and American thinkers with 
emphasis upon politics, religion, science, literature and the arts. 
Three class hours. Credit, 3. 

PHILOSOPHY 

Philosophy 2Ul, ETHICAL THEORY. -Analysis of selected problems of normative 
and meta-ethics involved in contemporary development of ethical theory. 
Prerequisite, permission of instructor. Credit, 3. 



I 



- 2 - 

Philosophy 2£L, 2£2, SELECTED PHILOSOPHERS .-Each semester a leading 
philosopher will be chosen for intensive reading. 

Prerequisite, permission of instructor. Credit, 3* 

each semester ■ 

Philosophy 258, KANT.-THE CRITIQUE OF PURE REASON will be read in its 
relation to Kant's philosophy as a whole. Credit, 3« 

Prerequisite, permission of instructor. 

Philosophy 261, 262, PROBLEMS IN THE HISTORY OF IDEAS. -An inquiry into 
a distinct major philosophical problem or group of related problems. 
Prerequisite, permission of instructor. Credit, 3« 

The Staff, 

Philosophy 28l, PHILOSOPHY OF LANGUAGE. -An inquiry into the nature of 
language, meaning, reference, communication and translation. Topics 
include the later Wittgenstein, Quine T s contextualism, the Whorf-Sapir 
hypothesis, problems in psycholinguistics. 

Prerequisite, permission of instructor. Credit, 3# 

Mr, Swanson, 

Philosophy 28£, METAPHYSICS, -The leading issues in contemporary debate 
on the nature and limits of metaphysical theory; examination of meta- 
physical concepts in relation to their use and treatment by other disci- 
plines , 

Prerequisite, permission of instructor. Credit, 3, 

Mr, Swanson, 

Philosophy 286, THEORY OF KNOWLEDGE, -A study of perception, subject- 
object relation, origins of knowledge, concept formation and language, 
the analytic-synthetic distinction, limits of empiricism and rationalism, 
relation of epistomology to metaphysics. Credit, 3. 

Prerequisite, permission of instructor. Mr* Swanson, 

WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT 

Wildlife Management 201, SEMINAR IN WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT. -Review and dis- 
cussion of the literature in Wildlife Management, including such subjects 
as population dynamics and manipulation, law and administration, Afro- 
Eurasion wildlife problems, influence of land-use, Arctic wildlife and 
others. Credit, 2, 

Two class hours. By arrangement, Mr, Greeley 



Cv . 7~~ t^?/2t/ 



y 



Gilbert L, Woodside, Provost 
Acting Dean, Graduate School 



J> 



CERTIFICATE OF ADVANCED GRADUATE STUDY 
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 



Most of the stronger Schools of Education offer a "sixth year" program 
of graduate study variously called a Certificate of Advanced Graduate Study 
or a Certificate of Educational Specialization, The need for such programs 
arises from two factors, namely, that new information, new practices and new 
resources in almost every field are multiplying with bewildering rapidity and 
secondly that programs to prepare educational personnel can no longer be con- 
fined to courses in professional education but must include many courses in 
allied fields. A few years ago the Masters Degree was quite adequate for 
these programs but this is no longer true. 

The Certificate of Advanced Graduate Study is earned through a program 
of specialization whose major objective is preparing school personnel to do 
a better job in a specific position. It is not to be thought of as merely the 
acquisition of some thirty graduate credits beyond the Masters Degree. It is 
true that it has turned out to be this in some institutions but our School of 
Education has always adhered closely to the idea that all graduate work, even 
for the Masters Degree, should be in planned programs leading to a definite 
competence in some area of school work. This planning is continued in our 
present proposal. Each program has been carefully considered by the staff of 
the School in terms of required courses and related courses. Each student 
will have an Advisory Committee to see that the objectives of his chosen pro- 
gram have been met. 

No attempt is made to indicate part of each program as being for the 
Masters Degree with the Certificate sitting like a cap on the top. On the 
contrary, the Certificate programs are prepared in terms of what we expect 
the student to have achieved when his program is completed. If the student 
has already achieved a Masters Degree his work will be evaluated in terms of the 
total program. If the student wishes to obtain a Masters Degree along the way 
he then must arrange his schedule and courses so as to meet the requirements 
for that degree. 

General Procedures 

(1) The student must apply for entrance to the Graduate School and to the 
School of Education for the Certificate. He must present transcripts of all 



- 2 - 



previous collegiate work. His scholastic record must show evidence of ability 
to do advanced graduate work. He must present four recommendations, two relat- 
ing to his scholastic aptitudes and two relating to his professional competence. 
He must fulfill admission requirements for his specific program. 

(2) If accepted, the student will enroll in a specific program and two 
faculty advisors will be named who will work out with the student a planned 
sequence of courses leading to the Certificate. This sequence will be reviewed 
and evaluated by the Committee on Graudate Studies. If accepted, the two 
faculty advisors will advise the student until the program is completed and 
then recommend the granting of the Certificate to the Committee on Graduate 
Studies of the School of Education. The faculty of the School of Education 
will then vote on the recommendation. If accepted, the School will present the 
Certificate. Since this is not a degree, the recipient will not be recognized 
during the regular University Commencement Program. 



GRADUATE CATALOGUE DESCRIPTION 

CERTIFICATE OF ADVANCED GRADUATE STUDY 

The School of Education conducts several programs leading to the Certi- 
ficate of Advanced Graduate Sr.udy. These are not degree programs. These 
programs call for a minimum of sixty semester hours of graduate work beyond 
the Bachelors degree, of which at least thirty must be taken at the University 
of Massachusetts and of these at least fifteen must be taken in the School of 
Education. Of all the course work leading to the Certificate at least eighteen 
credits must be in 200 courses. No credit is valid after ten years and the 
last 30 credits must be taken within a four year period. 

All Fees and expenses must be paid before the Certificate will be conferred. 

Four programs leading to the Certificate are offered. Each program re- 
quires a minimum of sixty credits beyond the Bachelors degree and the specific 
program of each candidate must be approved by the candidate*s Advisory Committee. 

(1) Reading Specialist. Prerequisites, teacher certification and two years 
of approved teaching. Recommended program: Education 120,149,153,177,201 or 
216,215,263,264,265,291 and electives; 21-30 hours in such related graduate 
courses as abnormal psychology, exceptional child, phonetics, audiology, psy- 



I 



- 3 - 



etiological tests, diagnosis and treatment of behavior problems. 

(2) School Guidance Specialist. Prerequisites, teacher certification and 
one year of approved teaching. Recommended program: Education 149,177,201,215, 
216,240,241,242,243,291 and electives; 21-30 hours in such related graduate 
courses as psychological and individual testing, exceptional child, abnormal 
psychology, theories of personality, sociology, and counseling techniques. 

(3) School Principals and Supervisors. Prerequisites, teacher certifica- 
tion and three years of approved teaching and/or administrative experience. 
Recommended program: Education 110, *49, 153, 177,200 or 201,209 or 213,211,214, 
220,283 or 284,289,291 and electives; 21-30 hours in related graduate courses 
in such fields as government, business administration, economics, sociology 
and psychology. 

(4) Specialist in Audio-Visual Education. Prerequisites, teacher certi- 
fication and two years of approved teaching, including one year»s experience 

in the audio-visual field. Recommended program: Education 120,121,122,123,160, 
166,188,200 or 201,211,214,267,268,291 and electives; 21-30 hours in related 
graduate courses in such fields as engineering, psychology, physics, and . 
statistics. 



CERTIFICATE OF ADVANCED GRADUATE STUDY 

FOR 
READING SPECIALIST 



Prerequisites 

(1) Certificate to teach 

(2) At least two years of approved teaching 

Recommended Program (A minimum of 60 credits beyond the Bachelors degree, 
approved by the candidate's Advisory Committee) 

1, Required Courses 

Ed. 120 Construction of Audiovisual Aids 

Ed. 149 Data Processing for Schools 

Ed, 153 Educational Tests and Measurement 

Ed. 177 Principles of School Guidance 

Ed, 201 Practicum in Education 

or 
5 Ed. 216 Seminar in Education 

Ed. 215 Workshop in Remedial Reading 

Ed. 263 Group Diagnosis of Reading Problems 

Ed. 264 Individual Case Studies of Reading Problems 

Ed. 265 Techniques in Remedial Reading 

Ed. 291 Educational Research 

Education Electives 

2, Related Graduate Courses (21-30 hours) 

Courses in Abnormal Psychology, Exceptional Child, Phonetics, 
Audiology, Psychological Tests, Diagnosis and Treatment of Behavior Disorders 
approved by the candidate's Advisory Committee. 



CERTIFICATE OF ADVANCED GRADUATE STUDY 

FOR 
SCHOOL GUIDANCE SPECIALISTS 



Prerequisites 

(1) Certificate to teach 

(2) At least one year of approved teaching 

Recommended Program (A minimum of 60 credits beyond the Bachelors degree, 
approved by the candidate's Advisory Committee) 

1, Required Courses 

Ed. 149 Data Processing for Schools 

Ed. 177 Principles of School Guidance 

Ed. 201 Practicum in Education 

Ed. 215 Workshop in Guidance 

Ed. 216 Seminar in Guidance 

Ed. 240 Occupations and Placement in School Guidance 

Ed. 241 Administration of School Guidance Services 

Ed. 242 Elementary School Guidance 

Ed. 243 Group Activities in Guidance 

Ed. 291 Educational Research 

Education Elect ives 

2. Related Graduate Courses (21-30 hours) 

Courses in Psychology and Individual Testing, Exceptional Child, 
Theories of Personality, Abnormal Psychology, Sociology, Counseling Techniques 
approved by the candidate's Advisory Committee. 



CERTIFICATE OF ADVANCED GRADUATE STUDY 

FOR 
SCHOOL PRINCIPALS AND SUPERVISORS 

Prerequisites 

(1) Certificate to teach 

(2) At least three years of approved teaching and/or administrative 
experience. 

Recommended Program (A minimum of 60 credits beyond the Bachelors degree, 
approved by the candidate's Advisory Committee) 

1. Required Courses 

Ed. 110 Evaluation of Elementary School 

or 
Ed. 153 Educational Tests and Measurement 

Ed. 149 Data Processing for Schools 

Ed. 177 Principles of School Guidance 

Ed. 200 Problem in Education 

or 
Ed. 201 Practicum in Education 

Ed. 209 Administration of Secondary School 

or 

Ed, 213 Administration of Elementary School 

Ed. 211 Community Relations for School Personnel 

Ed. 214 Principles of Supervision 

Ed. 220 Massachusetts School Law 

Ed. 233 Comprehensive High School 

and/or 
Ed. 284 Junior High School 

Ed. 289 Cooperative Curriculum Planning 

Ed. 291 Educational Research 

** School Finance 

**....... School Building Construction 

Education Electives 

2, Related Graduate Courses (21-30 hours) 

Appropriate courses in such fields as Government, Business Adminis- 
tration, Economics, Sociology and Psychology approved by the candidate's 
Advisory Committee. 

**Course to be given by New England Council for the Advancement of School 
Administration* 



CERTIFICATE OF ADVANCED GRADUATE STUDY 

FOR 
SPECIALIST IN AUDIOVISUAL EDUCATION 

Prerequisites 

(1) Certificate to teach 

(2) At least two years of approved teaching including one year of 
experience in the audiovisual field. 

Recommended Program (A minimum of 60 credits beyond the Bachelors degree, 
approved by the candidate's Advisory Committee) 

1. Required Courses 

Ed« 120 Construction of Audiovisual Materials 

Ed. 121 Teaching with Television and Radio 

Ed, 122 Photography in Education 

Ed. 123 Audiovisual Technology 

Ed. 160 Elementary School Curriculum 

Ed. 166 Preparation and Use of Audiovisual Materials 

Ed. 188 Secondary School Curriculum 

Ed. 200 Problem in Education 

or 
Ed. 201 Practicum in Education 

Ed. 211 Community Relations for School Personnel 

Ed. 214 Principles of Supervision 

Ed. 267 Auto-instructional Devices and Programed Learning 

Ed. 268 Administration of Audiovisual Services 

Ed, 291 Educational Research 

Education Electives 

2. Related Graduate Courses (21-30 hours) 

Appropriate courses in such fields as engineering, psychology, physic; 
and statistics approved by the candidate's Advisory Committee. 



Education 122. PHOTOGRAPHY IN EDUCATION. Theory and practice of taking and 

processing photographs for use in educational activities. 

Prerequisite: Ed. 120 and Ed. 166 Credit, 3. 

Education 123. AUDIOVISUAL TECHNOLOGY. Applications of acoustics, electri- 
city, magnetism, mechanics and optics to audiovisual equipment and techniques. 
Prerequisite: Ed, 166 Credit, 3. 

Education 149. DATA PROCESSING FOR SCHOOLS. Theory and practice in the use 

of simple types of data processing equipment in scheduling, record keeping, 
attendance, and registers. 

Prerequisites: Ed. 153 or Ed, 291 Credit, 3. 

Education 242. ELEMENTARY SCHOOL GUIDANCE. A study of skills, techniques, 

and objectives of guidance in the elementary school, emphasizing those aspects 

of guidance of particular interest to the elementary school teacher or 

guidance person. 

Prerequisite: Ed. 177, Psychology 188, and background in Psychology 

Credit, 3. 

Education 243. GROUP ACTIVITIES IN GUIDANCE. A guidance study of school 

groups. Attention will be given to group dynamics, discussion techniques, 

group counseling, sociometric methods, and other school group activities. 

Prerequisite: Ed. 177, Psychology 188, and background in Psychology 

Credit, 3, 

Education 263. DIAGNOSIS OF READING DIFFICULTIES. Theory and interpretation 
of diagnostic procedures to develop a background of information in the 
diagnosis and treatment of reading difficulties. 
Prerequisite: Ed. 161 Credit, 3. 

Education 264. INDIVIDUAL CASE STUDIES OF READING PROBLEMS. Practical 

experience in the gathering and summation of information to form a case study 

of a child in order to determine the seriousness of the reading problem and 

the underlying causes and to make recommendations for their correction or 

remediation. 

Prerequisite: Ed. 263 Credit, 3. 



Education 267. AUTO- INSTRUCTIONAL DEVICES AND PROGRAMED LEARNING. Theory and 
practice of programed learning for typical school subjects. Each student will 
set up objectives and construct a program for a unit of work. Implications 
for future use in education will be considered. 
Prerequisite: Ed. 166 Credit, 3. 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON 
FACULTY AND PROGRAM OF STUDY 

June 27, 1962, 2:00 p.m., Waltham, Mass. 



PRESENT : Trustees Haigis, Brown, Crowley, 
Furcolo, Kiernan, Schuck; Presi- 
dent Lederle and Provost Woods ide 

Chairman Haigis called the meeting to order and appointed 

Gerald J. Grady, University Business Manager, as Secretary pro tern. 

After motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED: That the curricular changes as presented 

in Attachment A be approved with the under- 
standing that the course titled "Special 
English Composition", English 3 (I) be 
given tentative approval pending further 
information to be presented by Provost 
Woods ide. 

After motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : That the recommendation of the Graduate 
Council for a Master of Science degree 
in Industrial Engineering be approved. 

After motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : That the recommendation of the Graduate 
Council for a Four-College Ph.D. program 
in Germanic Languages and Literature be 
approved. 

Chairman Haigis reported that a summary of current re- 
search at the University will be distributed, as well as a draft 
study by the University Office of Institutional Studies concerning 
service and research facilities available to assist in community and 
area development, and that a report of the Technical Institute Study 
Committee will be on the agenda at a fall meeting. 

The meeting was adjourned at 5:15 p.m. 



■+^d?. 




GeraLd J. Grady 
Secretary pro tern 



2359 



Undergraduate 
Courses 



Master of Science 
in Industrial 
Engineering 



Four-College 
Ph.D. in 
Germanic 
Languages and 
Literature 



2360 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



A 



University of Massachusetts 
MEMORANDUM 
From: Provost Date: June 19, 1962 

To: Trustee Committee on Faculty and Program of Study 
Subject: Curricular Changes 

The following curricular changes are recommended for approval: 
A. In the Department of English: 

1) Special designations for the courses which parallel English 2, 25, and 
26 for students who achieve advancement placement 

3* (I) Special Freshman Composition 

Structure and style in expository writing, library research and the 
documented paper, basic literary forms and critical terms* Open only 
to freshmen who have been exempted from English 1* 

2 class hours Credit, 2* 

28* (XI) 29* (I) Special Course in Masterpieces of Western Literature 
A study of the texts read in English 25-26 with additional outside 
readings* Freshmen who have achieved grades of A in English 2 or B 
in English 3 may substitute English 28*29 for English 25-26; a grade 
of B in English 28 is required for admission to English 29* English 25 
or 28 is prerequisite to elective courses in the Department* An 
elective course may, however, be taken concurrently with English 26 
or 28; for prospective majors, this elective should be English 61* 

3 class hours Credit, 3* 

2) Modifying English 68 to include six (6) plays instead of five (5)* 

68* (II) Shakespeare 

An intensive study of six plays, directed toward a scholarly appreci- 
ation of Shakespeare as a dramatic artist* Prerequisite, English 67* 
3 class hours Credit, 3* 

3) Clarifying prerequisites by amending three course descriptions to read: 

25* (I) (II) 26* (I) (II) Masterpieces of Western Literature 
A study of selected masterpieces* The course aims to enrich the 
student* s appreciation of literary values and develop his under- 
standing of abiding human issues* Prerequisite, English 2 or 3 ; 
IKgglish 25-6r:28 is prerequisite to English 26 and to elective courses 
in the Department* An elective course may, however, be taken con- 
currently with English 26 or 29: for prospective majors, this elective 
should be English 61 . 
3 class hours Credit, 3* 



_.i. 



• I; 



2. 

61. (I) (II) History of English Literature 

A study of the major phases of English literary history. Representa- 
tive writers from Chaucer to Dry den will be examined. English majors 
are expected to include English 61 among their first Departmental 
electives; it may be taken concurrently with English 26 or 29 . 
3 class hours Credit, 3 

and adding "Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor" to the description of: 



lis 


h 51. 


Advanced Expository Writing 


it 


52. 


Advanced Technical Writing 


it 


53. 


Creative Writing 


it 


54. 


Creative Writing 


it 


95. 


Seminar 


it 


96. 


Seminar 



B. In the Department of Speech: 

1) Discontinuation of Speech 65 and 66. 

2) Renumbering of five courses: 

51 to 50. Oral Interpretation 

91 to 51. Extemporaneous Speaking 

92 to 52. Discussion 

93 to 53. Argumentation and Debate 

94 to 54. Persuasion 

3) Introduction of six new courses: 

Speech 55 (I) History of Rhetorical Theory 

A study of rhetorical theory from Plato and Aristotle to the present 

with particular emphasis on the Greeks and Romans. Prerequisite, 

Speech 51, or permission of instructor. 

3 class hours Credit, 3 

Speech 57 (I) American Public Address 

Reading and analysis of speeches taken from the American political 
platform, academic platform, pulpit, courtroom, and ceremonial plat- 
form. Lectures, discussions, written reports, and listening to con- 
temporary addresses over the radio or on tape. Prerequisite, Junior 
standing or permission of instructor. 
3 class hours Credit, 3 

Speech 58 (II) Advanced Rhetorical Composition 

An intensive study of the departments of invention, disposition, and 
style* Practice in the application of principles studied in classi- 
cal and modern treatises by the preparation and revision of outlines 
and manuscripts for speeches. Prerequisite, Speech 51. 
3 class hours Credit, 3 



3. 

Speech 73 Introduction to Theatre 

An Introduction to the Art of the Theatre: A survey of its aesthetics, 

elements, forms and contributing artists; its influences and place in 

the culture of our society (the number will be changed after pre* 

registration). 

3 class hours and 10 laboratory hours per semester by arrangement. 

Credit, 3 

Speech 70 Fundamentals of Play Production 

A Study of the Methodology and Techniques of Play Production through 
lectures, demonstrations and practical laboratory work. The responsi- 
bilities and contributions of all participating artists will be 
examined in detail through an intensive study of every aspect of pro- 
duction from script to stage* (The number will be changed after pre- 
registration. ) 
3 class hours, 1 2-hour laboratory period. Credit, 3 

Speech 97 (I) 98 (II) Independent Study and Research 

For qualified seniors, independent study and research on selected 

problems in the various major areas of study. Credit, 1-3 

C. In the Department of Zoology: 

1) Discontinuation of Zoology 55 and 56. 

2) Changing the name of Zoology 78 to Population Genetics. 

3) Changing Zoology 37, 38, Anatomy and Physiology 

From: 2 lee. 1 three-hour laboratory per week, 3 credits 
To: 3 lee. 1 three-hour laboratory per week, 4 credits. 

4) Revise Zoology 69, Animal Parasitology (3 credits), to 

Zoology 69 (I) General Parasitology 

Morphology, life cycles, and physiology of primarily protozoan and 

helminth parasites, with emphasis on braod aspects of parasitism. 

Prerequisites, Zoology 1 and Chemistry 2 or 4. 

2 class hours, 2 2 -hour laboratory periods. Credit, 4 

D. In the Department of Mathematics: 

1) Discontinuation of Math 51, Modern Euclidean Geometry; Math 56, 
Synthetic Projective Geometry; and Math 66, Analytic Projective Geometry, 
and replacement by two new courses: 

Mathematics 61 Projective Geometry 

A study, from both the synthetic and analytic viewpoints, of properties 
invariant under projection, with emphasis on the real plane. Equivalence 
of Desarguesian and coordinate projective geometries. 
Prerequisite, Math 53. 
13 class hours Credit 3 



4. 

Mathematics 62 Higher Geometry 

A study along the lines of Klein's Erlang er Pro^ramm of various 
geometries and their groups of transformations, emphasizing Pro- 
jective, Affine, and Euclidean. Prerequisite, Hath 54 and Math 61 
or permission of instructor. 
3 class hours Credit, 3 

2) Discontinuation of Math 94, Theoretical Advanced Calculus, and replace- 
ment by: 

Mathematics 85 Introductory Modern Analysis I 

Real and Complex Numbers. Basic Topology of the Real Number System. 
Limit Concept and Continuity. Differentiation. Partial Differentia- 
tion. Prerequisite, Mathematics 91. 
3 class hours Credit, 3 

Mathematics 86 Introductory Modern Analysis II 

Bounded Variation. Riemann-Stieltjes Integration. Multiple Integrals* 

Line Integrals. Infinite Series. Sequences of Functions. Improper 

Riemann-Stieltjes Integrals. Prerequisite, Mathematics 85. 

3 class hours Credit, 3 

3) A new course: 

Mathematics 88 Sets and Ordered Structures 

Basic properties of sets. Ordered sets. Complete ordered sets. Well- 
ordered sets. Cardinal and ordinal numbers. Axiom of choice, well- 
ordering theorem, Zorn's Lemma and other forms of the axiom of choice. 
Cardinal arithmetic. Prerequisite, Mathematics 85 or permission. 
3 class hours. Credit, 3 

4) A semester by semester replacement of courses 4, 29, 30, 91 by: 

9 Analytic Geometry and Calculus I 

Logic, sets, topics from algebra, introduction to analytic geometry, 

functions, limits and derivatives, differentiation of algebraic 

functions, tangent and normal lines. Prerequisite, proficiency in 

trigonometry. 

3 class hours Credit, 3 

10 Analytic Geometry and Calculus II 

Applications of the derivative, conic sections and other algebraic 
curves, the definite integral and some of its applications, differ- 
entiation of transcendental functions. Prerequisite, Mathematics 9. 
3 class hours Credit, 3 

25 Analytic Geometry and Calculus III 

Techniques of integration, further applications of calculus, basic 
properties of continuous and differentiable functions, parametric 
equations, polar coordinates, infinite series. Prerequisite, Mathe- 
t ■* "ratics 10. 

3 class hours Credit, 3 



5. 

26 Analytic Geometry and Calculus IV 

Solid analytic geometry, partial differentiation, multiple integrals 

with applications, introduction to differential equations. Prerequisite, 

Mathematics 25. 

3 class hours Credit, 3 

And addition of a new no credit course which some students may need: 

07 Essentials of Analytic Trigonometry 

General definitions of trigonometric functions. Use of Tables, Graphs, 
Identities, Equations, Inverse Functions. For students who are de- 
ficient in Analytic Trigonometry. Prerequisite, Placement Scoring. 
One hour per week. Credit, None 

These course changes represent three important procedural changes: (1) 
during the summer counseling period, the student will have to choose from 
Hath 1, 7, or 9 with the placement examination and high school to guide 
him; (2) Math 1 and 2 will be a separate terminal course for students who 
do not need a working knowledge of calculus; and (3) teeth are put into the 
catalogue statement on admissions, page 19, "Students planning to major 
in the physical sciences and mathematics should, if possible, offer two 
years of algebra, one of plane geometry, and one-half year of trigonometry" • 
The big advantage of the revised program is that it will get the students 
who are planning to major in mathematics or a physical science into, and 
through, calculus more rapidly. It will also eliminate advanced placement 
credit for some of these students. 

E. In the Department of Chemistry, adding an optional two credits for six hours 
a week of laboratory work in connection with Chemistry 87, Inorganic Chemistry of 
the Common Elements. The course will then be available for 3 credits (without 
laboratory), or 5 credits (with laboratory). 

F. In the Department of History, modification and enlargement of History 57 and 
58, Hispanic American History, to the three courses below: 

History 57 (I) Colonial Latin America 

A study of Spanish and Portuguese expansion into the New World, the 
Indian cultures, the development of political, social, and economic insti- 
tutions, and the growth of the independence movement to 1810. 
3 class hours Credit, 3 

History 58 (II) Brazil and Argentina in the Nineteenth and Twentieth 

Centuries 
The emergence of the major South American states. Particular attention 
will be paid to the themes of political organization and economic change; 
and in the contemporary period to the growth of nationalism and mass-based 
political movements. 
3 class hours Credit, 3 

History 59 (I) The History of Mexico 

A study of Mexico from the end of the eighteenth century to the present. 
Emphasis will be given to political, economic, and social developments. 
3 class hours Credit, 3 



■iv;. 



6. 

G. Year courses with limited enrollments in two Asiatic languages: 

Elementary Japanese 1* (I) 2, (IX) 

For those who have had no previous creditable training in Japanese. 

Intensive practice in the language skills* 

3 class hours Credit, 3 

Elementary Hindi 1. (I) 2* (II) 

For those who have had no previous creditable training in Hindi* Intensive 

practice in the language skills* 

3 class hours Credit, 3 

H* Department of Forestry and Wildlife Management, a new course 

Forestry 95 (I) 96 (II) Seminar 

Specialized study in a selected area of forestry or wood technology* 

For seniors only* Credit 1-3 

Also, delete Forestry 81. Regional Silviculture 






Gilbert L. Woods ide 
Provost 



?: ' ■ «* 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 
MEMORANDUM 

From: Graduate Office Datet June 15, 1962 

To j Mr. Robert Doolan, Acting Secretary of the University 

The Graduate Council recommends to the President and Trustees the 
approval of a new Master of Science degree in Industrial Engineering(see 
attachment) 

The Graduate Council also recommends approval of a Four-College Ph.D. 
program in Germanic Languages and Literatures, Copies of the proposal as 
approved by the Graduate Council are enclosed. 

The Graduate Council has voted approval of the following new courses 
subject to approval by the University of Massachusetts Board of Trustees: 

AGRICULTURAL AND FOOD ECONOMICS 

275, ADVANCED AGRICULTURAL AND FOOD ECONOMICS. -An intensive study of the 
theory of the firm applied to agricultural and food production, including: 
production functions, cost functions, programming, and decision making 
principles; aggregate supply functions in agriculture; applications of 
principles to the agricultural firm, and to the distribution of income to 
and within agriculture. 
Prerequisite, AFE 175 or equivalent. Credit, 3. 

ECONOMICS 

2lU, FISCAL POLICY. -The theory and practices of government finance with 
special reference to the United States. Credit, 3# 

Mr. Gamble. 

252, ECONOMETRICS .-The application of modern statistical methods to macro 
and micro economic theory that has been formulated in mathematical terms. 
Prerequisites, Economics 25, 26, 175* Mathematics 1, 2, or U or consent of 
the instructor. Credit, 3- 

v Mr. Chaudhry, 

261, 262, GENERAL ECONOMIC HISTORY, -Evaluation of the major sectors of 
economic activity in the western world. Credit, 3. 

Mr, Blackman, 
FORESTRY 

20U, ADVANCED SILVICULTURE. -Growth and reproductive characteristics and 
requirements of trees and forest stands as they affect silvicultural 
management, particularly in relation to thinning and the establishment of 
forest regeneration. Credit, 3* 

Prerequisites, Forestry 153, V?k> and 156 or equivalents. Mr. Rhodes. 

205, RESEARCH CONCEPTS IN FOREST BIOLOGY.-A study of the development of 
biological knowledge relating to forestry from both the historical and 
philosophical points of view with special emphasis on contributions of 
contemporaneous scientific research. Given in alternate years. Credit, 3» 

Mr. Abbott. 



I 



MEMORANDUM 
From: William H. Weaver 
To: Dr. Gilbert L. Woodside 
Subject: Graduate Program in Industrial Engineering 



Date: February 21, 1962 



• coca 



e o • 



o o o c 



e«e«o*oo 



o c t> 9 • o c 



At the time of the last Engineering Committee for Professional Development ac- 
creditation examination 9 the examiner for the Industrial Engineering curriculum made a 
strong recommendation that the program be discontinued as an option in Mechanical Engi- 
neering, and that it be established as a separate undergraduate curriculum awarding a 
Bachelor of Science degree in Industrial Engineering. The Board of Trustees has approved 
this recommendation and the first such degrees will be awarded in June 19^3 • 

With this step in progress accomplished, we wish to request approval for the 
offering of a graduate program and the privilege to grant a Master of Science degree in 
Industrial Engineeringo 

In requesting permission to grant the Master of Science degree, it is not planned 
to require a formal planned program of courses, nor will a foreign language be required . 



The student will be obliged to meet the requirements as listed under the section 
Degrees, in the catalog of the Graduate School. 



Master' s 



I 



For those students who will not offer a thesis, a minimum of three additional 
? credit hours of work will be required covering an approved project and report involving 
[an application of Industrial Engineering principles. While a formal program of courses 
will not be required, it is expected that one course in each of the following fields will 
be included in the student's program: statistics and probability, analytical techniques 
in solving industrial problems, methods of measuring human work, computers and their ap- 
plication in industry. A program of study will be planned so that the student will be 
able, with the approval of his advisor, to select a combination of subjects which will 
best fit his needs. The student's program may include study and research in the areas of 
manufacturing planning and control, work measurement, plant layout and design, tradition- 
ally associated with Industrial Engineering.. It will be preferred that the student de- 
vote himself to the newer topics in the field such as: applied industrial statistics, 
data processing, operations research, and work study. 

It will be assumed that the student working in these areas will have, or will 
obtain, the necessary background of basic Industrial Engineering and mathematics to pur- 
sue the required advanced work. All individual graduate programs will include courses 
in related work offered by other departments. 

It is requested that approval be granted to offer the following courses: 

Industrial Engineering 

COURSES OPEN TO GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY 
(For either major or minor credit) 

i253« Methods of Measurement of Human Work.-— A critical study of the assumptions in 
IJmeasuring human effort in industry including the problems present in rating, predeter- 
mined data systems, the use of the high speed camera in securing data. 

Three class hours. Credit, 3. 

Prerequisites, I.E. 53 and 72 or comparable courses The Staff. 



I 



INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING 

54-. Advanced Topics in Engineering Economy.— A more intensive study of the basic sub- 
ject field of engineering economy as stated in I.E. $k, 

'hree class hours. Credit, 3« 

Prerequisite, I.E. $k or a similar basic course in Engineering Economy. The Staff. 

256. Advanced Topics in Data Processing. — Probability theory and information theory, 
components and operation of analog and digital computers, the analysis of large scale 
data processing systems as applied to the functioning of industrial control systems. 
Three class hours. Credit, 3- 

Prerequisite, I.E. 56 or a similar basic course in data processing principles 
and applications. The Staff. 

277. Manufacturing Control. — A quantitative approach to decision making in production 

management. Incremental analysis, linear programming, waiting line theory, statistics 

as applied to problems of economic quantity planning, production programming, statistical 

control and equipment purchase, 

Three class hours. Credit, 3« 

Prerequisite, A basic knowledge of statistics and the principles of 

operations research. The Staff. 

279 • Quantitative Methods in Industrial Engineering. — The application of mathematical 
concepts and the principles of operations research and probability to various Industrial 
Engineering problems. The theoretical background will be presented, demonstrated by 
example and applied by exercises and case problems. 

Three class hours. Credit, 3« 

^prerequisite, A basic knowledge of statistics and the principles of 
Iperations research. The Staff. 

300. Thesis.— Master's Degree. Credit, 3-10. 

COURSES OPEN TO BOTH GRADUATE AND UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 
(For either major or minor credit) 

I56. Analysis of Data Processing Systems.— Principles and applications of data process- 
ing and electronic computer systems for use by Industrial Engineers as a management tool 
for control and decision making. 

Three class hours. Credit, 3- 

Prerequisite, I.E. 51 or similar course or approval of the instructor. The Staff. 

172. Principles of Engineering Statistics. — A study of statistical principles as applied 
to engineering problems including: analysis of variances, design of experiments, sampling 
plans, statistical quality control. 

Three class hours. Credit, 3» 

Prerequisite, A basic course in statistics comparable to Statistics 77 '• The Staff. 




William H. Weaver, Head 
Mechanical Engineering Department 



A Petition to the Graduate Council for Permission to Institute a 
Cooperative Ph.D. Program in the Field of Germanic Languages and Literatures, 



I. General Remarks 

1) After discussions ranging over a period of more than three years, and 
in consideration of the increasing demand for a complete program of 
advanced studies in the field, the German Departments at Amherst, Mount 
Holyoke, and Smith College, and the Department of German-Russian at the 
University of Massachusetts have voted to petition the Graduate School 
Council for permission to offer a cooperative Ph.D. in the field of 
German language and literature, 

2) Our combined resources in terms both of faculty and of facilities (see 
below under II and III) are adequate to such a program. Moreover, the 
presence of Hennann J. Weigand, Visiting Professor at the University 
of Massachusetts and formerly Director of Graduate Studies in Germanics 
at Yale, offers a unique opportunity to establish and initiate at this 
time a Ph.D. program under the guidance of a leading international 
authority in the field. (Professor Weigand will be associated with 
our Department as a full time teacher for one more year. Upon his 
retirement we hope to replace him with someone approximating his scholar* 
ly stature.) 

3) In evaluating this application and, particularly, the proposed curricu- 
lum (see below under IV), the Council should bear in mind that although 
the M.A. degree in Germanics may constitute sufficient training for 
secondary school teaching, it is of course no longer considered adequate 
preparation for individuals intending to pursue a successful academic 
career in the field on the college and university level; that many of 
the leading institutions are by-passing this degree; and that, conse- 
quently, superior candidates will not, as a rule, pursue their advanced 
studies at institutions which do not offer a complete program. 

k) The following proposals are offered as supplement to the general rules 
governing the Ph.D. 



II. Faculty 



Note : Participation in this program requires that each participating 
member complete the necessary formal application for membership on the 
Graduate Faculty. The following is a list of names of faculty members 
at the four institutions who are qualified to apply for membership on 
the Graduate Faculty, together with an indication of their special 
fields of interest. 



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(Petition) -g- 

CASSIRER, Sidonie (Mount Holyoke College) 

B.A. ( Hunter College) 

M.A. (Yale University) 

Ph.D. (Yale University, 1957) 

(20th Century Literature) 

ELLERT, Frederick C. (University of Massachusetts) 

B.A, (University of Massachusetts) 

M.A, (Amherst College) 

Ph.D. (Stanford University, 1956) 

(l8th and 20th Century Literature) 

GITTEIMAN, Saul (Mount Holyoke College) 

B.A. (Drew University) 

M.A. (Columbia University) 

Ph.D. (University of Michigan, 1959) 

(l9th Century Literature) 

GRAHAM, Paul (Smith College) 
B.S. (Northwestern University) 
M.A. (Wesleyan University) 
Ph.D. (Yale University, 1932) 
(l8th and 19th Century Literature) 

HAUSER, Ronald (University of Massachusetts) 
B.S. (University of California, Berkeley) 
M.A. (University of California, Berkeley) 
Ph.D. (University of California, Berkeley, 1957) 
(19th Century Literature) 

HELLER, Peter (University of Massachusetts) 

B.A. (McGill University) 

M.A. (Columbia University) 

Ph.D. (Columbia University, 195l) 

(l8th and 20th Century Literature) 

LETTAU, Reinhard (Smith College) 
Ph.D. (Harvard University, i960) 
(20th Century Literature) 

PEPPARD, Murray (Amherst College) 

B.A. (Amherst College) 

M.A. {Yale University) 

Ph.D. (Yale University, 19^6) 

(19th and 20th Century Literature) 

RUKGE, Edith (Mount Holyoke College) 
A.B. (Swarthmore College) 
Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins University, 19^2) 
(l8th, 19th and 20th Century Literature) 

SCEKNA, Anthony (Amherst College) 
B.A. (Amherst College) 
M.A. (Columbia University) 
Ph.D. (Columbia University, 1937) 
(l8th Century Literature) 



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(Petition) -3- 

SCHIFFER, Eva (University of Massachusetts) 

B.S. (University of Massachusetts) 

M.A. (Radcliffe College) 

Ph.D. (Radcliffe College, I962) 

(l8th and 20th Century Literature) 

SCHNIEEERS, Marie (Smith College) 

B. A. (Barnard College) 

M.A. (Bryn Mawr College) 

Ph.D. (Bryn Mawr College, 1935) 

(Medieval Literature and Linguistics) 

SCHUMANN, Willy (Smith College) 
B.A. (Southern Methodist University) 
M.A. (Southern Methodist University) 
Ph.D. (Columbia University, 1959) 
(19th Century Literature) 

WEIGAND, Hermann J. (University of Massachusetts) 

A.B. (University of Michigan) 

M.A. (University of Michigan) 

Ph.D. (University of Michigan, 1916) 

(Medieval, l8th, 19th, 20th Century Literature) 

WEISE, Horst (Smith College) 
M.A, (University of Minnesota) 
Ph.D. (Harvard University, 1962) 
(20th Century Literature) 

III. Facilities 

The combined library resources of the four colleges and of HILC com- 
pare favorably to all but the leading collections. Other facilities, such 
as language laboratories, are available for practice teaching. 

IV. Curriculum 

l) Graduate Courses : 

Note : Credit may be allowed for all courses offered at the four institutions 
which are open either to graduate students only, or to both graduate and 
undergraduate students. There are at present, 33 such courses. In prac- 
tice course elections will be determined l) by the general Ph.D. require- 
ments as stated in the catalogue of the University of Massachusetts Gradu - 
ate School (1961-63; pp. Ik, 15); 2) by the Special Requirements for the 
Ph.D. in German (see below under item 2)); and 3) by the specific program 
of studies in the major and in the minor fields to be planned in accordance 
with the individaul needs of each candidate by his Guidance Committee . 






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(Petition) -4- 

Graduate Courses now Offered at : 

A) AMHERST COLLEGE: 

♦German kk, - Problems in German Literature* 

B) MOUNT HOLYOKE COLLEGE: 
*307f . - Goethe. 
*308s. - Goethe. 

*310s. - Romantic Movement in Germany. 

*311f - 312s. - Nineteenth Century Literature. 

*3l8s. - Teaching of German. 

*319f - 320s. - Modern Literature, 

*321f. - History of the German Language. 

lK)l«*K)2. - Studies in the Twentieth Century Novel. 
(Graduate Students only). 

1+03-W. - Studies in German Classicism, 
(Graduate Students only). 

C) SMITH COLLEGE 

50, 50a, 50b. - Research and Thesis. 

(Graduate Students only). 

51, 51a, 51b. - Special studies in the fields of literature and 

linguistics. 

(Graduate Students only). 

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♦Courses marked with an asterisk are open to both graduate and under- 
graduate students, Graduate students are expected to do additional 
reading and papers. 

D) UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS: 

Note : The following courses will be given in a succession of years 
depending on the needs of students. 

Courses Open to Graduate Students Only : 

200. - Problems Course. 

201. - Middle High German. 

202. - German Literature of the Middle Ages. 

20^. - Germanic Philology. - Gothic, Old High German. 



(Petition) -5- 

206. - The Age of Humanism and the Reformation, German Literature 

between 1^00 and 1600; Dsr Ackermann aus Boehmen , Brant, Murner, 
. Hutten, Luther, Hans Sachs. 

208, - The Baroque Age. Opitz, Gryphius, Grimmelshausen; The Second 
Silesian School. 

211. - The Age of Enlightenment with special reference to Lessing. 

213. - Young Goethe. A close survey of Goethe's work prior to the Weimar 

period. 

214. - The classical Goethe. 

221. - Schiller. A study of his life and works. 

225. - The German Bildungsroman , Goethe, Novalis, Keller, Stifter, Mann, 
Hesse. 

230. - Heine and his age. 

235 • - The Drama of the Romantic Period. Comprehensive treatment of 
the works of Tieck, Kleist, and Grillparzer. 

236. - The Realistic Drama. Comprehensive treatment of the works of 
Hebbel, Buchner, and Hauptmann. 

2^0. - Lyrical Poetry of the XXth Century. Intensive study of the works 
of George, Hofmannsthal, and Rilke. 

2^5. - Nihilism and affirmation in contemporary literature. A study 

of drama, fiction and essays reflecting the crisis of the modern 
age, with special emphasis on the period of Expressionism. 

255. - Stylistics. 

270. - Proseminar. 

260. - Seminar. 

300. - Thesis, Master's Degree. 

1*00. - Thesis, Ph.D. Degree. 

Courses Open to Both Graduate and Undergraduate Students : 

151. - Nineteenth Century Prose. 

152. - Poetry and Drama of the Nineteenth Century. 
153« - Twentieth Century Prose. 

154. - Poetry and Drama of the Twentieth Century. 
155* - Storm and Stress. 



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(Petition) -6- 

156. - Romanticism. 

157. - Goethe's Faust. 

159* - The Germanic Languages. 

160. - The Classical Period. 

Comparative Literature 
191* - Anglo-German Literary Relationships since 1750. 

Linguistics 
197. - Linguistics. 



2) Special Requirements for the Ph.D. in German ; 

In addition to general requirements governing the cooperative Ph.D., the 
Ph.D. in German should he administered in accordance with the following 
requirements and directives: 

A. Prerequisites : 

a) Prior to admission to the program prospective candidates must 
present evidence of fluency in German and of a general knowledge 

of German culture and literature at a level corresponding to under- 
graduate major requirements at an accredited College or University, 
as well as of special aptitude for independent research. This must 
be written evidence. Otherwise a screening committee will be appoin- 
ted from the staff of the German Departments at the four colleges 
to determine by means of a written and oral examination the f itnees 
of prospective candidates in terms of these requirements. 

b) Prior to admission to the comprehensive preliminary examination, 
candidates must demonstrate in writing l) a good reading knowledge 
of French and 2) a working knowledge of Latin or of any major lan- 
guage other than German or English, or one deemed pertinent to the 
candidate's field of specialization by the Guidance Committee. This 
requirement must be fulfilled by the end of the candidate's second 
semester. 

c) Prior to admission to the comprehensive preliminary examination, 
candidates must also demonstrate by written examination a reading 
knowledge of both Old High German or Gothic and Middle High German. 
This requirement will normally be fulfilled by satisfactory com- 
pletion of courses in these subjects. 

E. With respect to the preliminary comprehensive examination (which 
must include an oral examination, part of which is to be conduc- 
ted in German), the following general requirements shall apply: 



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(Petition) -7- 

a) All candidates shall demonstrate by written examination a general 
knowledge of the history of the Germanic language as well as of 
the linguistic development of German from the Old High German 
period to the present. 

b) In literature, the preliminary written comprehensive examination 
shall cover all of the major phases of German literature (l. Medieval, 
2, Humanism, Reformation, Baroque, 3» Enlightenment and Classicism, 

k. Romanticism and XlXth Century, 5« The Moderns). 

c) In addition to this general examination, candidates will offer one 
of the above-mentioned areas as their field of concentration, 

C) A minor will be selected by each candidate subject to approval by 
the Guidance Committee* 



COMMITTEE 



2361 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON 
BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

September 10, 1962, 10:30 a.m., Office of the President, U of M 

Chairman Haigis presiding 

PRESENT : Trustees Haigis, Cashin, Pumphret, 

Schuck, and President Lederle. Also 
present, Treasurer Johnson, Secretary 
Ryan, Provost Woods ide. Present for 
part of the meeting: Mr. Gordon 
Ainsworth, Judge Blassberg, Mr. Russell 
Barnes and Mr. Corwin H. Rose and 
Mr. & Mrs. Grandonico 

Chairman Haigis opened the meeting with the request for 
the ideas of the members of the committee with respect to proce- 
sures for conducting committee business and particularly for ideas 
regarding the kinds of information necessarily to be provided the 
Chairman with respect to buildings and grounds projects on the Uni- 
versity campus. Trustee Pumphret agreed to provide the Chairman 
with a copy of the monthly progress reports submitted by architects 
on projects to the Building Authority. 

Treasurer Johnson introduced the question under land 
acquisition of policy considerations arising out of discoveries in 
land subsoil analysis. Mr. Russell Barnes, for Gordon Ainsworth & 
Associates, reported to the committee that subsoil analysis tests 
had revealed existence of a serious soft clay problem in the area 
west of the campus where the football field and a future field 
house are planned. A layer of soft clay of up to 100 feet in depth 
underlies much of the land otherwise thought to be available for 
building on the campus running from the southern to the northern 
limits of the campus. The problem gets more acute as one moves 
from the east to the west of the campus, as the upper crust over 



£o\yZ 



COMMITTEE 



Brown 
Property 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

the soft clay layer gets thinner. The existence of this problem 

means that construction costs are higher for building on land with 

the soft clay layer underneath it. The additional construction costjs 

vary from zero to twelve dollars per square foot (square footage of 

the ground area covered, not total square footage of multi-story 

buildings). For low buildings, Mr. Barnes thought that added 

costs would aggregate approximately one to two percent of square 

foot costs. This additional cost was principally in the form of 

modifying the footings used in construction of the buildings. For 

higher buildings, it would be necessary to sink steel piling through 

the clay layer and this would occasion the higher building cost of 

up to $18.00 per square foot of ground area covered. The Chairman 

pointed out that these facts were extremely important to making 

decisions on the location of the athletic facilities and other 

buildings which had tentatively been planned for the areas 

generally affected by this problem. These revelations also have 

important bearing on decisions with respect to land to be acquired 

for University purposes. 

Action with regard to several properties under process of 

acquisition by the University was discussed. Appraisals were 

examined and upon motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To authorize Judge Blassberg to prepare votes 
that the committee hereby recommend for 
passage to the Board of Trustees with respect 
to the following properties: 

1. The Brown property - land which is being 
purchased by the University but title to 
which is affected by certain easements 
held by the town for drainage purposes. 



:OMMITTEE 



rn 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

2. The Doleva property - to change purchase 
previously voted to a friendly taking by 
eminent domain to clear a title defect 

and easement held by the town for drainage. 

3. The Tokasz property - to obtain a third 
appraisal on this property in order to 
facilitate a settlement. 

4. The Holmes Property - to obtain additional 
appraisal on this property for which the 
University has a 90-day option of $50,000. 

5. The Wysocki property - to recommend purchase 
for which the University has an option at 
$60,000. 

6. The Britt property - to recognize the per- 
mission of the owner of the house on the 
Britt property to move that house with the 
understanding that the price paid for the 
property was net of the value of the house - 
the net price being $15,000. 

Action on the Adams property which lies in the northe 

extremity of the campus was discussed. It was pointed out that 



approximately 19 acres of the Adams property lying to the east of 

North Pleasant Street on the North end of the campus lies within 

the area generally intended that the University acquire, but that 

Adams also has approximately 30 acres on the west side and slightly 

northerly of the other property which may well be available if the 

east plat is to be taken. It was 

VOTED : To recommend acquisition on this additional 
Adams property in view of the fact that it 
can be used for future University expansion 
provided it can be obtained at approximately 
the appraisal price of $58,000 for the entire 
farm of about 50 acres. 

After discussion, it was duly moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To obtain a fourth appraisal on the Szyrakowicz 
property to prepare for a settlement on this 
property taken earlier by eminent domain. 



2363 



Doleva 
Property 



Tokasz 
Property 

Holmes 
Property 



Wysocki 
Property 



Britt 
Property 



Adams 
Property 



Szymkowicz 
Property 



2364 



COMMITTEE 



Grandonico 
Property 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 
Appeal by Mr. & Mrs. Grandonico 

The committee received Mr. & Mrs. Grandonico, proprietors 
of the business on land which has been taken by eminent domain by 
the University, but over which negotiations are still unresolved 
with regard to the price to be paid. Mr. Grandonico told the 
committee that there was apparent difficulty in resolving the 
differences he had with the Treasurer in coming to an acceptable 
price for his property. He described the income he earned from his 
property and the investment he had made since acquring it in 1946. 
On the basis of these factors, he indicated that he desired 
$50,000 for the property. Impartial appraisers of his property 
made at the request of the University had come to less than $28,000. 
In discussing the problem with the Grandonicos, the Trustees pointed 
out that their responsibility for public funds and the requirement 
that they work within the restrictions of the law placed on them 
seemed to indicate that the great disparity between the appraisals 
received by the University and the price desired by the Grandonicos 
made it impossible to come to terms. It may be necessary for him 
to refer the matter to the jurisdiction of the courts. Furthermore, 
the Grandonicos requested that whether the matter of the price was 
settled or not, would it be possible for them to remain on the 
property in business until June of 1963? It was indicated that the 
entire matter would be referred to the Trustees. 

After discussion of the implications of the tentative and 
preliminary report on subsoil conditions, the committee upon motion 
being duly made and seconded 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To authorize Treasurer Johnson to obtain 

appraisals on land lying south of the Uni- 
versity campus from the Brown property to 
as far as Amity Street in the area west of 
the houses on Sunset Avenue to Route 116 
by-pass. 

On the recommendation of architects - old projects, the 

committee discussed at length and upon motion being duly made and 

seconded 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees the 
following with respect to projects already 
under study or design: 

1. U59-6 Engineering Building and Service 

Building for the Experiment Station - 
William W. Drummey, Boston. 

2. U63-7 Improvements and additions to the 

Power Plant and utility distribution 
system: 

a. Steam and Electric - Merrill 
Associates, Boston. 

b. Water, Drainage & Sewer - Whitman 
& Howard, Boston. 

c. Study of Power Plant, electric 
generation, fuel, and utility 
distribution - Stone & Webster, 
Inc. , Boston. 

3. U63-3 Coal Storage Facilities - Stone & 

Webster, Boston. 

4. U63-1 Administration Building - Campbell & 

Aldrich, Boston with Pietro Belluschi 
of Cambridge as design consultant. 

On the recommendation of architects - new projects, the 
committee took up the matter of recommending an architect for the 
new Fine Arts Building. Upon a review of the recommendations of 
design coordinator, Pietro Belluschi and in examination of the work 
of a number of architects, the committee upon motion being duly 
made and seconded 



2365 



Land 
Appraisals 



Engineering 
Building 



Power 
Plant 



Coal 
Facilities 

Adminis t r at ion 
Building 



2366 



Classroom & 

Laboratory 

Building 



COMMITTEE 



Machmer Hall 
addition 



Poultry 
Plant 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees 

recommend to the Commission on Administration 
and Finance for project U63-5 Classroom and 
Laboratory Building (Fine Arts) for the College 
of Arts & Sciences (plans), in order of preference: 

1. Minoru Yamasaki, Detroit, Michigan 

2. I. M. Pei & Associates, New York City 

3. Harry Weese, Chicago, Illinois 

The committee considered the requirement for making a 

recommendation for an architect for the addition to Machmer Hall. 

After general consideration and upon motion being duly made and 

seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees 

recommend to the Commission on Administra- 
tion and Finance the selection as architect 
for U63-4 - Addition to Machmer Hall (plans), 
in order of preference, the following: 

1. James A. Britton, Greenfield, Mass. 

2. The Architects Collaborative, Cambridge, Mass. 

3. William W. Drummey, Boston, Mass. 

The committee considered the problem of selecting an 

architect for the new Poultry Plant. In the course of discussion, 

the members indicated that it would be extremely helpful to have 

recommendations from their design coordinator (Belluschi) before 

making a decision. Accordingly, upon motion being duly made and 

seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 

they defer the recommendation of an architect 
for the U63-6, New Poultry Plant (plans), to 
permit further consideration of the matter, 
and to request that an extension of time for 
submitting recommendations be granted by the 
Commission on Administration and Finance. 

In connection with the question of the renovation of cer- 
tain older classroom buildings, the committee considered the 

problem in some detail, and upon motion being duly made and 
seconded 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees the 

selection of Louis W. Ross as the architect 
for the renovation of the Large Animal Build- 
ing - Federal Funds, $9,500; Gift, $1,000; 
Estimated State Funds, $8,500 with the 
architect's fee to be charged to the gift 
not to exceed $1,000. 

And 

VOTED : To defer consideration of architects for 
the renovation of other buildings under 
project U63-2. 

Acceptance of Buildings 

After inspection by the University of Massachusetts Build 

ing Authority, the committee 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees the 
acceptance of Dormitory A - Gorman House. 

Conditional Acceptance of Buildings 

After inspection, the committee 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees the 
acceptance of Dormitory B - Brett House - 
conditional on the completion of remaining 
work according to plans and specifications. 

The committee took up the question of recommending a name 

for the new School of Business Administration Building and after 

general discussion and upon motion being duly made and seconded, 

it was 

VOTED : To table the question of the recommendation 
of a name for the new School of Business 
Administration Building pending further 
investigation and development of a policy 
for naming buildings. 



2367 



Procedures 

The committee considered the question of conditional 
acceptance of buildings and projects by the Board of Trustees. It 
was felt that the problems involved in inspecting the projects ex- 
peditiously and coming to a recommendation for acceptance to be 



Large 

Animal 

Building 



Gorman House 
acceptance 



Brett House 



Business 
Adminis t rat ion 
Building 



2368 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 
presented to the Board could best be handled by having monthly 
meetings of the Buildings and Grounds Committee. It is the intent io^i 
of the chairman, therefore, to arrange for monthly meetings at the 
convenience of the committee members in so far as possible. 
The meeting was adjourned at 5:30 p.m. 





John W. Ryan^ 
Secretary, Board of Trustees 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

September 27, 1962, 10:45 a.m., Office of Dean Pietro Belluschi, 

M. I.T., Cambridge, Mass. 

Chairman Haigis presiding 



PRESENT: Trustees Cashin, Haigis, Pumphret, 
Schuck, and President Lederle. 
Also Treasurer Johnson and Secretary 
Ryan 

The purpose of the meeting was to focus on overall plans 

I 
for campus environment and to discuss with Dean Belluschi specific 

recommendations of architects for several projects now authorized. 
By way of introduction, Dean Belluschi discussed the importance of 
architecture and environmental planning to an institution of higher 
learning. He said that the total campus layout must provide an 
environment in which ideas can exist. If it be possible, the stu- 
dents should be exposed to ideas and concepts which they may acquire; 
by "osmosis" if by no other way. Students come to a university in 
their most sensitive period of life and are able to acquire more 
understanding of culture from such things as architectural environ- 
ment than, perhaps, books. On a campus each building should be 
related to the rest. Space is also architecture - that is layout 
and landscaping are important and their planning is inseparable 
from sound campus planning. For a public institution of higher 
learning, the overall goal should be to design buildings that blend 
together, which are properly placed, being neither excessively 
modernistic nor old fashioned. Some buildings are examples of what 
not to do. Architecture should be "an understatement", giving 
careful attention to detail. A public institution should not be 
ostentatious because it cannot afford it either from the financial 



2370 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



or from the public relations point of view. 

Selection of architects for public buildings involves 
critical decisions because not only is it necessary to select an 
architect with fine ideas and great talent, it is also important to 
recognize that one cannot "hold his hand". What is needed in an 
architect is more than a talented designer; he must also have a 
sound organization behind him that understands building budgets and 
the organization involved in carrying through a project. One must 
also consider that architects are very busy. One cannot select a 
big name and be certain that that person will actually do the work. 
Selecting an architect whose home base is at some distance is no 
longer a substantial technical problem. 

It was pointed out to Dean Belluschi that the University 
of Massachusetts has different kinds of construction jobs. Because 
the kind of job varies, the kind of architect required may vary. 
The University building program, for example, includes original con- 
struction projects, additions to existing structures, renovation and 
other kinds of work. The overall theme on the University of Massa- 
chusetts campus is unity, which stresses simplicity of design and 
careful attention to details. This means that even if the greatest 
architects in the world were available, selecting each to build a 
monument of his own would result in a campus hodgepodge. The re- 
sult would be disunity, and the Board of Trustees has no desire to 
see this happen. Dean Belluschi said that Massachusetts has as many 
good architects as any other state. Given the work load, however, 
and the fact that different kinds of projects require different 
kinds of architects, the local supply of architectural services for 
the jobs that are needed at the moment may prove to be inadequate 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



at a given time. 

It was further pointed out that the Board of Trustees it- 
self brings to this problem a wide variety of experiences and back- 
ground with respect to campus organization and architecture. The 
Trustees themselves are familiar with institutions which vary widely 
in design. The result of this is to bring to bear on any given 
question of architect selection a broad range of experience and 
aesthetic preference. 

An immediate problem facing the Board discussed by the 
committee is the question of conflicting preferences with respect 
to architects between the Board and the Commission on Administration 
and Finance. The question may be stated in this way: will the 
Commission on Administration and Finance accept one of the three 
firms recommended for each campus project thus justifying the time 
expended by the Board members in arriving at the recommendations? 
The position of the Board, it was felt, is strengthened now that 
its recommendations are arrived at through a process which includes 
participation of expert advisers such as Dean Belluschi. With 
respect to additions and renovations on existing structures, the 
question was raised whether Dean Belluschi was prepared to make 
recommendations for architects or whether the original architect 
of the building should be used if available. Belluschi 1 s reply was 
that generally it is best to use the original architect. Sometimes 
he said conditions call for exercising extreme caution so as not to 
ruin a good old building by an ill-conceived change in the original 
structure. 

The Engineering Building was reported to have been com- 
pletely reviewed as to plans and specifications and ready to go to 



2371 



2372 



COMMITTEE 



Engineering 
Building 



Administration 
Building 



Food 

Technology 

Building 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

bid. Dean Belluschi reported that even though planning had 

virtually been completed prior to his having been retained by the 

Board as an adviser, he reviewed the Engineering Building plans. 

He said that he thinks it is sensitively done (the architect is 

William W. Drummey) and if the work proceeds well and good brick is 

selected, it should be a good building. After general discussion 

and upon motion being duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To accept the plans for the Engineering 
Building for recommendation to the Board 
of Trustees for acceptance. 

The Administration Building (Campbell & Aldrich) was 
discussed. Dean Belluschi reported that the architects had sub- 
mitted the preliminary sketches of elevations showing three alterna- 
tives. The committee and the Dean reviewed the three preliminary 
sketches and agreed that the one identified as scheme C is the 
preferable. Dean Belluschi said that he is satisfied with the be- 
ginnings and that the architects are moving ahead. 

The additional structure for Food Technology was discussed 
It was pointed out that this project has been under design for four 
years. The plans and specifications are now ready for final approva 
Some problems both with the site planning and the elevation of the 
structure were pointed out, but it was understood that to make 
major changes in either would begin the process all over again. 
The result would be not only loss of time but loss of a considerable 
portion of the financial investment represented by the plan which 
may total as much as a hundred thousand dollars. It was generally 
felt that the plans for the building would be greatly improved by 
the introduction of certain changes. Dean Belluschi agreed to talk 
to the architect and to recommend to him the necessary changes. 



OMMITTEE 



2 3 73 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



PAGE NOT USED 



2 3 74 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



PAGE NOT USED 



COMMITTEE 



2375 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Discussion of the alternative of beginning all over again to plan 
the building should be deferred until after an attempt to make the 
changes that would improve the present design. 

It was reported to Dean Belluschi that the Board of 
Trustees had recommended three architects in order of preference: 
Minoru Yamasaki, I. M. Pei & Associates, and Harry Weese. Dean 
Belluschi commented that Yamasaki is registered in Massachusetts 
and is the architect of a building currently under construction at 
Harvard University. It was reported that Sasaki, Walker & Associat4s 
are at present preparing a report on the location of the building 
on campus. Some alterations in original intentions may be necessary 
due to topographical conditions. 

It was reported that the Board of Trustees had recommende< 
as architects for the addition to Machmer Hall the following archi- 
tects in order of preference: James A. Britton, The Architects 
Collaborative and William W. Drummey. 

This construction was reported to consist of many small 
buildings with one to be larger size and to contain laboratory 
facilities. No recommendation had been settled by the Board of 
Trustees, but discussion had centered on recommending Northeast 
Agricultural Engineering Service of Hampden, Massachusetts. Dean 
Belluschi said that the Board should insist that architects should 



be considered with great care. It may be that this firm should be 
recommended for the job and that they would retain an architect as 
a consultant to design the laboratory building. If so, then it 
should be asked to suggest an architect for consultation purposes. 
Normally an architect recommends engineers, but there is no reason 



Fine Arts 
Building 



Machmer 

Hall 

Addition 



Poultry 
Plant 



2376 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

for the reverse to be true if circumstances warrant. It was re- 
ported to the committee that the Division of Building Construction 
had requested recommendations for architects for studies of build- 
ing projects. These studies are financed not out of funds belonging 
to the University but out of funds of the Division. The projects 
for which studies are requested are: 

1. The Graduate Research Facility - a three million 
dollar project. The emphasis on this facility 
is to provide an internal plan for the building 
which will permit extreme flexibility, with 
movable partitions and other movable features. 

2. A Classroom Building (Arts and Sciences) a two 
and a half million project. 

3. Agricultural Research, Instruction and Farm Service 
Facility (South Deerfield) this is a one and a half 
million dollar project which involves the con- 
struction of a modern set of farm buildings and 
laboratories which again must stress flexibility 
and adaptability for use. 

Question was raised whether decision had been made or was 

still open with respect to expansion of Arts and Sciences Building 

(Bartlett Hall) by an addition to the original structure or by a new 

building. It was reported that Sasaki, Walker & Associates are 



studying the question of building location and included in this 



is 



the question of whether to expand Bartlett Hall or to construct a 
new building. In the course of general discussion, it was pointed 
out that the campus of a great university should show some of the 
finest artistic creations of the times. Dean Belluschi agreed but 
he said that a state institution is limited in its ability to do 
this. Nevertheless, a beautiful and inspiring aesthetic effect can 
be created by careful attention to detail, careful selection of 
material, and by paying respect to scale and to space utilization. 
The Chairman suggested that the question of architects for project 



I 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

studies be taken up by the committee at its meeting on October 16th 

The question was raised whether plans had proceeded with 
respect to the elimination of vehicular traffic from some of the 
streets on campus and limiting them to pedestrian use. It was re- 
ported that Sasaki, Walker & Associates in their general locational 
plans include recommendations for a traffic circulation plan as 
well as recommendations for the location of the football facility. 
The meeting adjourned at 12:30 p.m. to be reconvened at 
2:30 p.m. in the office of the Honorable Charles Gibbons, 
Commissioner of Administration and Finance. 



The Trustee Committee on Buildings and Grounds reconvened 
at 2:30 p.m. in the office of the Honorable Charles Gibbons, 
Commissioner of Administration and Finance. Chairman Haigis pre- 
sided over the meeting which was attended also by Trustees Pumphret 
Cashin, Schuck and President Lederle, and Treasurer Johnson and 
Secretary Ryan were also present. 

The Chairman said that the main purpose of the meeting 
was to enable the Board of Trustees to reach a basis of understand- 
ing with the Commission with respect to the submission of recommenda- 
tions on architects and the subsequent selection of architects for 
buildings for the campus of the University of Massachusetts. As a 
focus for coming to this understanding, the recommendations were 
presented for architects for the Fine Arts Classroom Building in 



J 



order of preference : 



1. Minoru Yamasaki 

2. I. M. Pei & Associates 

3. Harry Weese 



2377 



Fine Arts 
Building 



2378 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Commissioner Gibbons stated the general policy of the 
Governor, the Commissioner and the Division of Building Construction 
was that the best architects available within the state should be 
selected for a project. There had been a departure from this policy 
with respect to the State Office Building, and a good deal of 
trouble and difficulty had been experienced. The Trustee Committee 
agreed that wherever possible Massachusetts architects should be se- 
lected for construction of buildings on the University of Massachu- 
setts campus. This is certainly the feeling of the Board of 
Trustees, and it was endorsed by its consultant, Dean Pietro 
Belluschi. In some cases, however, the construction of a building 
on a university campus may call for a spirit or theme that is 
different from that which could be obtained from among those Massa- 
chusetts architects available. Therefore, in keeping with the idea 
that buildings on the University campus ought to reflect some of the 
finest architectural expression of the time and ought to be inspira- 
tions and educational media in aesthetics for students, the occasion 
may arise from time to time when an out-of-state architect will be 
recommended by the Board for selection. The occasions are governed 
not merely by unavailability of local architects, but also by the 
desire to include among the edifices on campus examples of some of 
the finest in the architectural field. 

Overall, the general theme of planning and construction 
at the University influences recommendations for architects, in 
order that simplicity, careful attention to detail, and sensitive 
selection of building materials be preserved. Mr. Gibbons said the 
Governor does oppose as a general matter the use of out-of-state 
architects. 



COMMITTEE 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



The Trustee Committee referred to the addition planned 
for Machmer Hall and presented the recommendation of the Board of 

Trustees in order of preference : 

1. James A. Britton 

2. The Architects Collaborative 

3. William W. Drummey 

Commissioner Gibbons replied that the Division of Building Con- 
struction had already recommended the architect which appeared at 
the top of the list of recommendations from the Board of Trustees. 
The Board pointed out to the Commissioner that there was great hope 
that an understanding could be reached on the procedures by which 
architects could be recommended and selected. It is important to 
know the extent to which recommendations from the Board of Trustees 
will be honored in the selection of architects. For one reason, 
the Board could be highly embarrassed if its recommendations are 
ignored and architects whom it has contacted to determine their 
availability are ultimately rejected. Furthermore, members of the 
Board of Trustees and the Trustee Committee on Buildings and Grounds 
invest much time and effort in participating in the formulation of 
recommendations for architects. 

The consultant to the Board, Dean Pietro Belluschi, is a 
nationally recognized consultant in the field of architecture. He 
has advised the Board that it must think in terms of getting the 
most value for the construction dollar and he is concerned both witl 
economy of construction and the preservation of aesthetic values. 
The Board of Trustees and their consultant, Dean Belluschi, realize 
that uniqueness of design is not suited to the campus. Recommenda- 
tions for architects from the Board will reflect the aim to achieve 
unity of architectural expression on campus, rather than a 



2379 



Machmer 

Hall 

Addition 



2380 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

hodgepodge of monuments to a number of outstanding and talented 
architects. The University administration and the Board of Trustees 
want to achieve an expression of art and architecture and to create 
an environment that will be conducive to the complete education of 
the student in the appreciation of beauty, design, and aesthetic 



value. 



Finally, it was pointed out that fine architecture is not 



necessarily expensive architecture. Perhaps the most expensive 
architecture is that which is provided by careless and incompetent 
architects whose services result in unacceptable or inadequate plans 
At the present, the administration is faced with the problem of 
accepting unsatisfactory designs for buildings thus threatening the 
unity, harmony and beauty of design of that portion of the campus 
in which the building will be located, or of beginning over again th^ 
preparation of designs and specifications with the consequent dis- 
carding of the work already done despite the financial investment 
in that work. 

Commissioner Gibbons suggested that he welcomed the 
recommendation of the Trustees and that before any selections are 
made by his agency, he will contact the University of Massachusetts 
to determine the reaction of the administration and the Board of 



Trustees to the architect desired by the Commission. 

It was decided by the committee to submit the recommenda- 
tions of the Board to the Commissioner by letter, with the under- 
standing that before an architect should be assigned, the 
Commissioner will check with the University administration and in- 
form them of the preferred choice. The Commissioner said that an 



OMM1TTEE 



2381 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



architect will not be assigned over the strenuous objection of the 
Board of Trustees of the University. 

The meeting adjourned at 3:45 p.m. 




Secretary, Board of Trustees 



2382 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE 
FACULTY AIT) PROGRAM OF STUDY 

October 18, 1962, 10:15 a.m., Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston 

Chairman, Trustee Crowley 

PRESENT : Trustees Crowley, Haigis, Brown, 

Furcolo, Kiernan, Schuck, President 
Lederle, Secretary Ryan, Treasurer 
Johnson and Director of Institutional 
Studies Redfern 

The meeting was called to order by the Chairman, Trustee 
Crowley. The Chairman asked President Lederle to set the informal 
agenda for the meeting. President Lederle said that this was to be 
a working meeting and probably the members would prefer not to make 
any final decisions. Background statistical and comparative data 
was prepared for presentation which would indicate the framework 
within which administrative plans for the University would have to 
be determined. Among these administrative plans is the plan for 
salary actions under autonomy legislation. At this point the Presi- 
dent requested Dr. R.edfern to proceed with the presentation of the 



data. 



Dr. Redfern, with the aid of charts and bar graphs, 



discussed at length the framework within which salary policy had 

been recommended. Among the items covered were: 

1. An indication of the situation from 1955-1975 with 
respect to the number of Massachusetts college-age 
youth in the population, the number expected to de- 
mand admission to institutions of higher learning, 
the number of which could be accommodated according 
to present plans by private institutions of higher 
learning within the state, institutions outside the 
state, public institutions other than the Univer- 
sity, and, finally, the University of Massachusetts. 
By 1975, Dr. Redfern indicated, the conservative 
estimate of college-age youth in Massachusetts ex- 
pecting public higher education beyond the planned 
capacity of private schools and admission at out- 
of-state institutions - approximates 97,000 of 
whom approximately 50,000 can be accommodated in 
terms of present facilities and projected expension. 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



2. Data relative to the sources of financial support 
for the University of Massachusetts. Among other 
things these data indicate relative decrease in the 
amount of public tax support from the state from 
54% to 48% of the total cost of the University program. 

3. The rank of Massachusetts with respect to the rest of 
the states in the Union for certain selected 
characteristics including per capita income, per 
capita property tax payments, per capita expenditures 
for education and others. 

4. The ratio of public expenditures for public higher 
education in Massachusetts as compared with other 
New England states. 

5. The ratio of public expenditures for public higher 
education in Massachusetts with respect to other 
comparable states in the Union, outside of New England, 
whose universities have achieved a level of excellence. 

6. Comparison of the salaries of related professional 
groups and the improvements in them over recent years 
compared with faculty salaries over the same period. 

7. Comparison of the salaries of professors at public 
institutions of higher education in New England. 

8. Comparison of University of Massachusetts salary 
maxima with selected institutions of higher education 
across the country. 

Data relative to the proposed salary adjustments at 
the University of Massachusetts. 

With respect to the comparative position of the Univer- 
sity in terms of faculty salaries, Dr. Redfern indicated that the 
use of the AAUP averages as a basis of comparison was subject to 
misinterpretation. The major reason for this is that the averages 
are derived by comparing institutions of widely divergent 
objectives, size, and quality. The administration and Board of 
Trustees must be prepared to deal with the comparison of the Uni- 
versity with AAUP averages because various public groups will employ 
this comparative device. Even though the Board of Trustees will 
not necessarily be influenced by the comparison, the comparison 



2383 



:384 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

itself and analyses of its shortcomings must be available. 

The question was raised whether the University of Massa- 
chusetts should expect to compare itself with universities of much 
greater size conducting some functions not presently carried on by 
the University of Massachusetts; for example, the Universities of 
Michigan or Illinois. President Lederle responded in the affirmativ^ 
if it is understood that such a comparison is in terms of an 
objective. The most meaningful comparison of data regarding faculty 
salaries or other matters is in terms of the gap which must be 
closed to bring the University of Massachusetts up to the level to 
which it aspires, which is more that of the leading institutions of 
the country than that of regional institutions in Mew England. The 
salaries at the University, for example, should be correlated with 
other universities not on the basis of comparability of enrollments 
or geography but rather on the basis of quality. 

The administration of the University and the Board of 
Trustees must be concerned with relationships x^ith the public and 
with the Legislature. The history of legislation dealing with the 
public service in Massachusetts indicates a preference for equal, 
across-the-board treatment for all public servants in terms of salary 
increases or other benefits voted from time to time. Even though 
the autonomy legislation establishes a basis for separate and unique 
actions by the University, with respect to its personnel, undoubtedly 
it will be necessary to be prepared to justify and rejustify the 
propriety and necessity of these actions to various public groups 
and the Legislature. 



COMMITTEE 



2385 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



In the course of general discussion on the recognition of 
the need for salary action by the Board of Trustees, committee 
members asked by what procedures were decisions made with respect 
to recommending faculty members for salary adjustments. The Presi- 
dent responded by outlining the general framework for action. He 
pointed out that the recommendation which is presented to the Board 
of Trustees represents the ultimate result of a democratic process 
of institutional decision-making. The process begins in the De- 
partment with a personnel committee and the Head of the Department 
determing departmental recommendations for salary actions'. These 
determinations and recommendations are sent to the dean of the college 



or school involved who was responsible for reviewing them, making 
his own determinations, usually in consultation with an executive 
committee, and making recommendations to the Provost. At the 
Provost's level, there is general review for policy and budget 
purposes as well as to maintain a balance among the schools and 
colleges. At this point, recommendations are made to the President 
who then determines the recommendations to be made to the Board. 
Discussion turned to the question of the role expected of the 
Trustee; that is, what is the extent of the Trustee's responsibility 
to go into the matter of the recommendations. The President in- 
dicated that in his acquaintance with Trustee responsibility at the 
University and comparable institutions around the country, the 
Trustee responsibility is one of policy determination and review, 
with reliance on the administration for the application of policy 
to the schools and colleges, the departments and to the faculty 

members. 



2386 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Under autonomy, the University administration and the 
Board of Trustees have an obligation and an opportunity to review 
many practices and policies of the University. The committee agreed 
that review and action in all of these policy matters should come 
slowly under autonomy in order to move sound] In the near future, 
the Board of Trustees would be asked to consider policies relating 
not only to salary matters but also with respect to faculty tenure, 
the nature and tenure of department headships, sabbatical leaves, 
and other matters. 

The committee members suggested that it would be advisable 
to have an informational release on the actions of the Board pre- 
pared for review by the Board prior to actual release after the meet 
ing is over and the action has been taken. This statement should 
clearly indicate that these salary actions are a first step, and 
necessary subsequent actions will be taken by the Board of Trustees 
to preserve and advance the quality of the University of Massachusetts. 

The committee agreed that in bringing this matter before 
the full Board at the next meeting, it would be desirable to have 
documentation of the legal requirements of the University in taking 
actions such as these under autonomy legislation as well as advice 
and counsel received from the Attorney General, if any. It was 
further suggested that a presentation much like the one made by 
Dr. Redfern to the committee at this meeting would be helpful if 
repeated at the full Board meeting. Furthermore, the full Board 
should have a written policy statement for approval dealing with 
the procedure for personnel review at the department, college, 
Provost and Presidential levels in the University; as well as all 



:OMMITTEE 



2387 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

of the documentation which had been prepared for this present meet- 
ing — which are attached to these minutes and numbered Documents 
FPS 63-01, 63-02, 63-03, 63-04, 63-05, 63-06. 

The meeting was adjourned at 3:30 p.m. 





John W. Ryan 
Secretary of the Board of Trustees 



2,388 



COMMITTEE 



Comprehensive 

Circulation 

Study 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND 

GROUNDS 

October 23, 1962, 12:30 p.m., Student Union, U of M 

Chairman Haigis presiding 



PRESENT : Trustees Haigis, Lederle, Cashin, 
Pumphret, Schuck. Also present, 
Secretary Ryan and Treasurer Johnson. 
Through part of the meeting were 
Professor Theodore Bacon, Mr. Galehouse, 
Mr. Yost and Mr. Gardes cu. 

The Chairman opened the meeting and invited the attention 
of the members to the Comprehensive Circulation Study - #1 which had 
been prepared by Sasaki, Walker & Associates, Inc., as design and 
planning consultants to the University of Massachusetts. The Chair- 
man introduced Mr. Richard Galehouse, representative of Sasaki, 
Walker & Associates, who discussed the report. Mr. Galehouse said 
that the Comprehensive Circulation Study was intended to provide 
guidance on development in the Amherst region, in the town and on 
the campus. Study #1 was intended to provide a decision-making 
framework which would indicate the volume of traffic and its circu- 
lation with consequent effect on the location of principal facili- 
ties on campus. It is not intended to be a detailed site plan. 

The committee heard statements from Mr. Galehouse, 

Mr. Yost and Professor Bacon. These statements produced the 

following information for the committee: 

1. Amherst is located only 20 miles from the #2 popula- 
tion center in the state. The Benjamin plan (the 
Sasaki, Walker & Associates team worked very closely 
with Mr. Allen Benjamin who is the town planning 
consultant) which contemplates the construction of 
"loop routes", offers the prospect of alternative 
high capacity, high speed traffic routes around the 
campus area of the University. 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



2. This Comprehensive Circulation study has been carried 
far enough to arrive at regional and town planning 
proposals and new campus traffic pattern studies are 
necessary and are underway. 

3. Costs of the program for providing circulatory high 
capacity, high speed routes will undoubtedly require 
participation by the state, the University and, to 
some extent, the town. 

4. At the next Amherst town meeting there will be an 
attempt to establish the exterior street lines for 
that portion of the circulatory route in the plan 
which is to be done by the town. Reports are made 
every two weeks by the Town Planning Board to the 
Town Selectmen so that the town is kept abreast of 
the intentions of the Town Planning Board. The 
plan growing out of the Comprehensive Circulation 
Study takes into account more growth than the near 
future promises and reflects an estimate of the 
total population growth of the region. 

Consultants indicated that several factors influenced the 

recommendation of the site for the Sports Facility (football 

stadium). These included: 

1. The amount of land required for the structures 
and ancillary parking. 

2. Placement of the facility so that it was convenient 
to the campus but not interrupt ive of other campus 
activities. 

3* To take into account the desirability of future 
placement of a field house in proximity to the 
stadium and its parking facilities. 

4. To place in proper relationship with respect to new 
dormitory construction and to commuter parking 
facilities. 

5. The movement of traffic. 

6. Existing soil conditions. 

It was reported that funds are available for the purchase 
of land needed for locating the Sports Facility on the proposed sit4» 
Appraisals are already being made and by January, 1963 it is hoped 
that recommendations will be ready to request Board action to 



2389 



Sports 
Facility 



2390 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

acquire all of the land needed. In the opinion of Gordon Ainsworth 
& Associates, Registered Land Surveyors and Civil Engineers, the 
site is ideal for the Sports Facility. The parking facilities de- 
signed for the Sports Facility include a commuter student parking 
lot that will accommodate initially 1500 vehicles. As the Univer- 
sity enrollment approaches 20,000, the University can expect 
pressure to provide parking for 6,000 faculty, staff and commuter 
automobiles. While parking lots take up substantial land expanse, 
parking ramp facilities are prohibitively expensive unless land costs 
are very high. The present parking facilities illustrated on the 
Circulation Study and preliminary location plans are diagrammatic 
only. Even when constructed, parking lots remain available for use 
as future construction sites. 

Traffic circulation routes and the Sports Facility are in 
conformity with town development plans and University expansion 
plans. The high cost of construction of the circulatory routes does 
create financing difficulties. Part of the solution to this problem 
lies in staging the development to fit annual town actions into the 
overall plan. It may be necessary to make special requests to the 
Legislature for state support of part of the program. After genera 
discussion and upon motion being duly made and seconded, it was 
unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees the 
acquisition of land required for the pro- 
posed site of the Sports Facility. 

To recommend to the Board of Trustees to 
approve the proposed site for the Sports 
Facility with the exact location of the 
structure itself to be determined in con- 
sultation with the architect appointed by 
the University of Massachusetts Building 
Authority, the University Design Coordinator, 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Mr. Belluschi, Mr. Sasaki, and Gordon E. 
Ainsworth & Associates. 

Trustee Pumphret, Chairman of the Massachusetts Building 
Authority, informed the committee of the status of the various 
projects which have been approved by the Board of Trustees. The 
Authority had experienced some problems in determining alternative 
methods of finance, but was moving ahead on the projects. 

The committee received a project status statement 
(BG 63-01) which indicated the schedule of construction and present 
stage of completion for various University projects. The Chairman 
reported that visual presentations showing the status of projects 
under construction or approved for construction are being prepared 
to improve communications with the Board and to save time at the 
Board meetings in making the report of the Buildings and Grounds 
Committee. 
Recommendations to the Board 

1. The Poultry Plant - it was 

VOTED: To recommend to the Board of Trustees the 
approval of the Northeast Agricultural 
Engineering Service, Ludlow, Massachusetts 
with the provision that an architect be re- 
tained for consulting purposes by Northeast 
Agricultural Engineering Service with the 
choice of the architect subject to the 
approval of the Board of Trustees; and further 
communication of the recommendation if 
approved by the Board of Trustees to the 
Commission on Administration & Finance shall 
include documentation supporting the choice 
and recommendation by the Board. 

2. Research, Instruction and Service Building - College 
of Agriculture (study). The Dean of the College of 
Agriculture hopes that the architect for this 
facility gets agricultural engineering advice in 
the work. The project involves many buildings in- 
cluding barns, an arena, research laboratories and 
others. It is a multi-purpose facility. There may 



2391 



Project 
Status 






Poultry 
Plant 



Research, 
Instruction & 
Service 
Building 






COMMITTEE 



Arts & Sciences 

Classroom 

Building 



Graduate 
Research 
Facility 



Recondit ioning 
of Older 
Buildings 
(study) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

be some desirability in emphasizing experi- 
mentation in the designing itself in an effort 
to improve architecture and construction for 
agricultural purposes. After general discussion, 
it was agreed by the committee that the matter 
of an architect for Research, Instruction and 
Service Buildings should be discussed again with 
architectural consultant Dean Belluschi. 

3. The Arts & Sciences Classroom Building - Upon motion 
being duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
the approval of the following archi- 
tects in order of preference for se- 
lection for the design of the Classroom, 
Laboratory, and Office Building for 
College of Arts & Sciences (study). 

1. Horacio Caminos, Cambridge 

2. Carl Koch, Cambridge 

3. William H. Brown, Boston 

If approved by the Board of Trustees, 
this recommendation is to be communicated 
to the Commission on Administration & 
Finance including a letter of documenta- 
tion supporting the choice recommended by 
the Board. 

After general discussion and upon motion being duly made 

and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees the 
approval for work on the Graduate Research 
Facilities (study) the following architects 
in order of preference: 

1. The Architects Collaborative, Cambridge 

2. Frederick A. Stahl, Cambridge 

3. Pierce and Pierce, Boston 

If approved by the Board of Trustees, this 
recommendation is to be communicated to the 
Commission on Administration & Finance in- 
cluding the letter of documentation support- 
ing the choice recommended by the Board. 

Reconditioning of older buildings - an architect had been 

appointed to make a study which includes many projects on the campus 

The study has never been made. It is possible that the study should 

be deferred or cancelled. It was decided to consider the matter 



I 



COMMITTEE 



I 



2393 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



further before making any recommendations. 

Medical School - After general discussion and upon motion 

being duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED ; To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
a letter be sent to the Commission on Ad- 
ministration & Finance explaining that 
recommendations for architects for the con- 
struction of a Medical School should not 
precede selection of a Dean for that School, 
the determination of the policies and pro- 
grams of that School, and the selection of 
a site. 

Judge Blassberg requested the committee to recommend to 

the Board of Trustees that they approve by unanimous vote the 

acquisition by eminent domain of the Doleva property. After genera], 

discussion and upon motion being duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED ; To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
a unanimous vote from the Board of Trustees 
authorize the acquiring of the John S. 
Doleva property by eminent domain in fee. 

In accordance with Chapter 544 of the Acts of 
1961, Item 8262-12 authorizing the Trustees 
of the University to purchase certain land 
with the buildings thereon for the development 
of the University and the authority granted 
therein, an independent appraisal of the value 
of the land and buildings having been made by 
qualified, dis- interested appraisers and filed 
with Kenneth W. Johnson, Treasurer, on motion 
duly made and seconded it was unanimously 

VOTED: To recommend that the Trustees of 
the University take by eminent domain in fee 
the property of John S. Doleva consisting of 
Three (3) acres of land, more or less, in 
Amherst, Hampshire County, Massachusetts, 
lying westerly of Sunset Avenue and at the 
westerly end of a right-of-way known as Fearing 
Street Extension, more particularly bounded and 
described as follows: 

Being the same premises described in a deed to 
the said John S. Doleva and Margaret Doleva re- 
corded in the Hampshire County Registry of Deeds, 
Book 925, Page 216, the said Margaret Doleva 
having died full title is vested in the said John 
S. Doleva. 



Medical 
School 



Land 
Acquisition 



Doleva 
Property 



• 9 p 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



It was reported to the committee that by November 9, 1962 
meeting there may be other recommendations for land acquisition if 
appraisals now underway are completed. All the parcels that could 
be involved have already been discussed before the committee and it 
was the general feeling of the committee that there will be no 
objection to bringing such recommendations to the Board for action 
at that meeting if appraisals are completed. 



There being no further business, the meeting adjourned at 



4:30 p.m. 




John W. Ryan 
Secretary, Board of Trustees 



COMMITTEE 



2395 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF CONMITTEE ON RECOGNIZED STUDENT 

ACTIVITIES 

November 15, 1962, 1:00 p.m., Student Union, Amherst 

Chairman Schuck presiding 



PRESENT : Trustees Furcolo, Haigis, Pumphret, 
Schuck, President Lederle. Also 
present were Secretary Ryan, Dean 
Field, Mr. Scott, Director of 
Student Union, Dean Curtis, Dean 
Hopkins & seventeen students (names 
and offices on attached list). 

Trustee Schuck suggested four general areas in which 

discussion between the Trustees and the students could be fruitful 

1. The role of extra-curricular activities in the life of 
a student and the relationship of such activities to 
academic achievement. 

2. Student -faculty relationships at the University of 
Massachusetts. 

3. The contribution students can make to a great state 
university. 

4. The role of Trustees of the University of Massachusetts 
in making student activities meaningful. 

The first topic was selected for discussion. 

Students 

Students made the following points: 

1. The extra-curricular activity often forms an im- 
portant dimension in the life of a student not 
simply as a release for energy or social activity 
but as activity having important vocational and 
even intellectual implications to the student. 

2. Student activities imply the assumption of leader- 
ship responsibilities by the students themselves. 
These leadership activities take time and attention. 

3. A proposal was made that some kind of academic 
credit be offered for certain extra-curricular 
work such as participation in band, journalism 
and drama activities. 



2396 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

In some institutions such credit is possible. 

For some students, student activities represent a 
substantial investment of time and activity. From 
12 to 60 hours a week may be spent in an activity. 
This results in more time being spent on a particular 
activity than for some of the courses the student is 
taking. Giving credit for some of the student activity 
work would result in bolstering the reputation of the 
activity with both the faculty and administration of 
the University. 

Trustees 

Against this general background of student interest in 
reviewing the reputation and recognition of student activities by 
faculty, administration and trustees of the University, the trustee 
members of the committee evaluated the points raised by the students 
and discussed with them some of the implications. To place the 
issue of student activities in the proper perspective, the question 
was raised, "Why do students come to the University?" 

Both students and trustees agreed that the availability of 
extra-curricular activities provided the student with an obligation 
as well as an opportunity to make choices in the apportioning of 
his limited time and to gain experience in scheduling it carefully 
and effectively. Student activities, it was agreed, also prepare 
the student psychologically and philosophically for accepting 
obligations of public service and community activity as a supplement 
to his life work rather than a substitute. 

Since there was no time to explore the other three 
subjects, the chairman expressed the hope that the group could meet 
again. 

The meeting adjourned at 3:00 p.m.; trustees attended the 
meeting of the University Committee on Recognized Student 
Organizations. 




^^^^^^^^^^^te 




John W. Ryan 
Secretary, Board of Trustees 



Student attending s&eting 



AB3EE3&S, nml 
msm£m 9 Oexsld 

£$m , £&Mf a Sheila 
$®&$MM 9 Joseph 

BSHSB, Jean 
BOSSES, Ba$id 
CQBSS02SR, BonaXd 
CHSKg&K, Steal 
SSL VBGE2®, Joseph 
BEHEST* Sfcesrs- 

2£SM6£i 9 Stephen 
U&SBSim&G, David 

H8StSXB@3, Rone 
SlOBIGHB&Hs BSESy 
SfiSHSE, Audrey 

3REIS&SE* Jeanes 



Editorial Editor, €0£ISGXfi5 S&Kspeper 

SSJ&2? {Student Workshop on Activities geebleas) 

Hen's Judiciary 

Sec&etssy* Women's Iteterdosm Council 

¥cung Ge&ocEafcs 

1EBSSS (Senior Yesxboafc) 

S&esideat, Mostes? Bosrd <ta2en*s Honor Society) 

President, Fhi Eta S&g?sa {Fresftsian Ken's Scholastic) 

President Student Senate 

Operetta guild 

SfiHs House Counselor 

Senate Services Ctiaaai&tee 

Recognised Student ©rganiss&tions Coissittee 

Student ¥alon Governing Board 

Eadlo Station WBJk 

€>Xsss President S&ce&bridge School *63~ 

Senate Vice President 

Editor* GQmMBXM Wem&a&es 

C£E&E8I£13 tiex&spaper 
Eadio Station $£SIk 



VA5&2Q&, Patricia 



Fine Arts Council 



I 



COMMITTEE 



I 



] 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

November 23, 1962, 12:30 p.m., Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston 

Dr. Frank L. Boyden, Chairman of the Board, presiding 



PRESENT: Trustees Boyden, Brett, Healey, 

Cashin, Crowley, President Lederle 
and Secretary Ryan 

Members of the Executive Committee considered the need 
for legal counsel in view of the growth and responsibilities of the 
Board. It was agreed that the committee would report to the full 
Board at the next meeting on the committee's general feeling that 
legal counsel should be available to the University. 

In general discussion, the members of the committee 
discussed the increase in demand on the Board members growing out 
of both the increase in size of the University and increase in the 
responsibilities of the Board due to recent legislation on autonomy 
The committee agreed that careful attention should be paid to the 
organization of the Board for carrying out its responsibilities, 
and the possibility that some adjustments should be made in the 
committee structure and procedure. It was agreed by the committee 
that a report should be made to the full Board calling for Board 
approval of a study of the organization of the Board. 

The committee took up the matter of making recommendations 
for honorary degrees for 1963. After general discussion and upon 
motion being duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To present list of candidates approved 
by the committee to the Board. 

The committee received a report from the President on the 
negotiations with outstanding leaders of business, labor and public 
affairs with participation in the 1963 Charter Day program. The 
committee approved the negotiations and 

VOTED : To recommend approval of honorary degrees 
by the Board of Trustees to be conferred 
upon the participants in the Charter Day 
program. 

The committee approved making a recommendation to the 
full Board to consider convening some special convocations, 
particularly in the field of education and business, at which out- 
standing accomplishments in these fields could be recognized 
through the conferring of degrees and in other appropriate ways. 
If possible, these convocations should be held during the Centennial 
Year, 



The meeting adjourned at 3:30 p.m. 



2397 




John W. Ryan 
Secretary, Board of Trustees 



2398 



COMMITTEE 



Under- 
graduate 
Curriculum 
Changes 



Population 

Research 

Institute 



Graduate 

Curriculum 

Changes 



Master of 
Science Degree 
in Physical 
Education 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FACULTY 

AND PROGRAM OF STUDY 

December 4, 1962, 11:00 a.m., Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston, Mass. 

PRESENT : Trustees Crowley, Brown, Schuck, 

Kiernan, Haigis, Lederle, Secretary 
Ryan, Provost Woods ide and Treasurer 
Johnson 

The meeting was called to order by Chairman Crowley. 

Provost Woods ide informed the committee that the 
curricular change recommendations were intended to streamline the 
Agriculture curriculum. Many deletions of courses had been made in 
order to bring the curriculum more up to date. The recommendations 
represent two years of work at the departmental and college level in 
Agriculture. The committee discussed the relationship of the 
College of Agriculture curriculum to its role in an urban society. 
After general discussion and upon motion being duly made and 
seconded, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend approval by the Board of 
Trustees of the curricular changes as 
set forth in document 63-061. 

The committee considered the proposal to establish the 
Massachusetts Population Research Institute. In response to 
questions, it was reported that the Institute is an integral part of 
the Department of Sociology; features intraschool cooperation in 
curriculum and research. The Institute would be the fourth such 
entity on the campus. After general discussion and upon motion 
being made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
approval of the establishment of the 
Massachusetts Population Research In- 
stitute as set forth in document 63-058. 

Provost Woodside presented to the committee the recommenda- 
tions from the Graduate Council that certain changes be made in the 
graduate curriculum. After general discussion and upon motion being 
duly made and seconded, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 

approval of the changes in the graduate 
curriculum as set forth in document 
63-059. 

The committee considered the request from the Graduate 
School Council for approval of the graduate program in Physical 
Education leading to the Master of Science degree in Physical Educa- 
tion. After general discussion and upon motion being duly made and 



I 



COMMITTEE 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



seconded, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 

approval of graduate program in Physical 
Education leading to the Master of 
Science degree in Physical Education as 
set forth in document 63-060. 

The committee received and considered a request from 
Warren P. McGuirk, Dean of the School of Physical Education, that 
the name of the Department of Recreation Leadership be changed to 
the Department of Recreation. After general discussion and upon 
motion being duly made and seconded, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
approval of the change of the name of 
the Department of Recreation Leadership 
to the Department of Recreation. 

Members of the committee agreed to meet again at 
10:30 a.m., Saturday, January 5, 1963 in Amherst on the campus of 
the University of Massachusetts. There being no further business, 
the meeting was adjourned at 12 o'clock noon. 




John W. Ryan 
Secretary, Board of Trustees 



2399 



Department of 
Recreation 



COMMITTEE 



Warren 
Farm 



Billings 
Property 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 
December 18, 1962, 12:30 p.m., Student Union, U of M, Amherst 

Chairman Haigis presiding 



PRESENT : Trustees Haigis, Schuck, Pumphret, 
Cashin and President Lederle. Also 
present: Treasurer Johnson, Provost 
Woods ide, Secretary 

The Chairman opened the meeting with the first item on 

the agenda. 

Proposed Gifts of Land to the University 

The Chairman reported to the committee that representa- 
tives of the Buildings and Grounds Committee and of the University 
visited the H. E. Warren Farm of Ashland on Tuesday, October 30. 
A careful inspection was made of the Farm and its buildings. 
General conclusions are that: 

1. The Warren Farm, as a farm, offers no advantage 
to the University program. 

2. Acceptance of the Warren Farm as a gift with the 
intention of holding it for future use would 
cause a financial drain on the University. 

3. Acceptance of the Warren Farm in order to convert 
it into fluid capital for general University use 
would be of great assistance to the University. 

After general discussion and upon motion being duly made and 
seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board that the Board 
not approve acceptance of the Warren Farm 
except under terms which permit its con- 
version into fluid capital for general 
University use; 

And that the administration of the Univer- 
sity be authorized to continue negotiations 
on this basis. 

At the request of the Chairman, Treasurer Johnson re- 
ported on an offer of the Billings property to the University. 
Billings property includes a box factory, a saw mill, water rights 
on Lake Wyola, ten houses and approximately 1300 acres of timber 
land representing 4% million board feet of lumber. The acreage, 



I 



COMMITTEE 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



however, is scattered in some 40 parcels lying in six different 
towns. At the present stage of negotiation, Mr. Billings asks the 
University to pay $30,000 plus $6,500 per year for ten years or for 
life whichever is the shorter period for the timber land only. 
The Forestry Department at the University is not greatly interested 
in the property on these terms. The Department is anxious to ac- 
quire access to mature timber for research purposes, and the 
Billings property offers this opportunity. However, the cost of 
the property if it is to be recovered by exploitation of the re- 
sources, and the scattered nature of the property would present 
substantial problems to a Forestry Department because they are not 
set up to manage a commercial enterprise of that magnitude. After 
general discussion it was the consensus of the members of the 
committee that the committee recommend to the Board of Trustees 
that they reject the present terms of the offer of the Billings 
property but indicate willingness on the part of the University to 
accept an outright gift of some of the prime parcels of mature 
timber in order to preserve the timber which is standing and to 
contribute to the research program of the University. It was 
further agreed that the University administration should continue 
negotiations with Mr. Billings. 

At the request of the Chairman, Provost Woodside reported 
on the Peabody estate on Nantucket Island as a potential gift to 
the University. The property consists of some 70 upland acres and 
25 acres of marshland on Nantucket Island including the main 
residence, a beach house and two garages each able to accommodate 
three cars, with one of the garages having an apartment in it. The 
property also includes three vehicles, furnishings and equipment. 
The property may be of interest to the University because of its 
great potential usefulness to the marine biology program. At 
present, what is involved in the negotiation is the 7/8 interest in 
the property which is now held by the Nina Haven Foundation, plus 
a possible contribution from the Foundation towards the maintenance 
of the property for the first year or so after transfer to the 
University. The remaining 1/8 of the property is in the possession 
of the American Humane Education Society of Boston which received 
it from Mr. Peabody prior to his death. 

In response to question, the Provost discussed the number 
of possible uses to which the property could be put should it come 
under the control of the University. The Provost said that it was 
an excellent location for biological research because it is in a 
unique location where both northern and southern flora and fauna 
overlap. It would be an ideal site for ecological studies. The 
Recreation Department would be interested in having access to the 
property for its program purposes. The Food Science and Technology 
research programs could make good use of this property. The 
Nantucket property would provide a site away from the campus for 
seminars and study groups which is not at present available to the 
University. There is a possible use of the property in the Fine 
Arts program. Finally, the Provost indicated that the Maria 
Mitchell Foundation would be delighted to have some access to the 
property in connection with its responsibilities for instruction 



2401 



Nantucket 
Property 



2402 



COMMITTEE 



Architects 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



of Nantucket residents in natural history. 

Mr. Iseman, the attorney of the Nina Haven Foundation, 
who discussed the Nantucket property and the conditions of the gift 
with the representatives of the University administration and of 
the Buildings and Grounds Committee, also explained some of the 
scholarship activities of the Foundation. It is possible that, in 
the future, some of the scholarship funds available to the Founda- 
tion which are not needed for students in the Stuart, Florida area 
could be allocated to support students engaged in research at the 
Nantucket facility. The Provost also indicated that financial 
support is quite possible from both private foundations and the 
Federal Government in support of marine biological research. 

The Provost showed several colored slides of the property 
pointing out that some erosion is indicated on the bluffs of the 
property. It was reported that this erosion is at a slow rate but 
can be arrested by construction of a barrier which would cost 
approximately $15,000. It does not, and would not, threaten the 
main house for many years. After general discussion and upon motion 
being duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 

acceptance of the Nantucket property of 
the late Stephen Peabody subject to 
acquiring the 1/8 interest in that 
property now possessed by the American 
Humane Education Society. 

Report on Architects 

At the request of the Chairman, Treasurer Johnson 
distributed a summary report of the status of recommendations and 
appointments of architects. The Chairman reported that in the 
company of the Chairman of the Board, he had met with the Commission 
on Administration and Finance on December 12, 1962 at the request 
of the Commissioner. Prior to the meeting, the Chairman informed 
the entire Commission of the reaffirmation by the Board of Trustees 
of its previous recommendations with respect to architects. At the 
meeting, the Commissioner on Administration and Finance indicated 
that there was a strong desire to appoint an architect for the 
Medical School despite the Board recommendation that no architect 
be appointed until a Dean is selected, but that the question of se- 
lection of an architect for that school would be removed from the 
immediate agenda of the meeting. The Chairman reported that he and 
Dr. Boyden had been requested by the Commissioner to meet with the 
Commissioner and the Governor on December 19, 1962. After general 
discussion, there was a consensus among the members of the 
committee that the position of the Board should be fully reconfirmed 
especially with respect to delaying the selection of architects for 
the Medical School until such time as a Dean of that School has 
been appointed. 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Report on the Master Plan - southwest area - 

dormitory and dining facilities 

The Chairman introduced Dean William Field, Dean of 
Students, for the purpose of presenting to the committee the 
attached proposal for residence and dining facilities in the south- 
west area of the campus which had been taken up by the Master 
Planning Committee. Dean Field indicated that review of the under- 
graduate enrollment projection prepared by the Office of Institu- 
tional Studies of the University shows a need for 5,000 beds and 
2,550 dining seats to meet the ~ requirements by September 1969. 
This follows the capital outlay program adopted by, the Trustees 
last April. Dean Field suggested that the request for these 
facilities can be made most logically in terms of three project 
groups each of which may be developed as an integrated dining and 
residence unit. Tq supplement his remarks, Dean Field distributed 
documents showing the dormitory and dining facilities requested, 
date required, and estimated cost. After general discussion and 
upon motion being duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board that it accept 
in principle the projects and schedule 
as outlined in Document 63-068 and to 
notify the Massachusetts Building 
Authority of the decision of the Board. 

Trustee Pumphret, Chairman of the University of Massachu- 
setts Building Authority, commended Dean Field on the preparation 
of the data papers on dormitory and dining commons needs. He re- 
ported to the committee that a meeting would be set up with the 
architect, Hugh Stubbins & Associates, representative of the Build- 
ing Authority, the Chairman of the Buildings & Grounds Committee 
and representatives of the University administration. Mr. Stubbins 
is working on the design of this dormitory area for the Authority. 

The Chairman reported to the committee that he has re- 
quested the designation of the Office of Planning Engineer as the 
central point for the collection of data and deposit of reports 
and official documents relevant to the master plan, construction 
on campus, land acquisition and all other relevant matters. 

The Treasurer reported to the committee that the comple- 
tion of the acquisition of land desired to establish the northeast 
corner of the University boundary requires the acquisition of the 
property of a Mr. Peter French. This property includes approxi- 
mately 1 acre on which is located a house with two apartments. It 
is north of the University and lies next to the Adams Farm. The 
Treasurer reported that he has two appraisals of the property - 
one for $10,300 and the other for $11,500. The University holds 
an option to purchase the French property in the amount of $11,500. 
After general discussion and upon motion being duly made and 
seconded, it was 



2403 



Dormitories 



Office of 

Planning 

Engineer 



French 
Property 



2 



COMMITTEE 



Faculty 
Hous ing 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
authorization to purchase the French 
property for $11,500 providing that 
the University will honor the rental 
leases on the apartments in the property 
for twelve months from the date of deed 
with the rent for the promises being 
paid to the University and on the further 
condition that real estate taxes on the 
property will be pro-rated as of the 
date of deed. 

Reactions to the University Faculty Housing Policy 

The committee acknowledged receipt of information from 
faculty members regarding the new faculty housing policy adopted 
by the Board at the meeting of October 4, 1962. After general 
discussion, the consensus of the members of the committee was 
satisfaction with the new policy and with the position of the 
University administration pursuant thereto. 



4:30 p.m. 



There being no further business, the meeting adjourned at 



C 





John W. Ryan' 
ecretary, Board of Trustees 



63 ~d£f 
hwest Residence A 

X a 

An analysis of the graduate and undergraduate er, iei pro lections 

prepared by the Office of Institutional Studies indicates a need for 
5>JU; beds and 2550 dining seats to be provided' by September of 1969, 

The requests for these facilities can be made most logically in terms 
01 three project groups, each to foe developed as an integrated dining 
ana residence unit Q & 



if P ro ^f sts outlined in Groups I and II are clearly designated for 
the southwest area The inclusion of the Group III projects would 
raise the occupancy of the area to 5000 and may exceed the desirable 
capacity lor the area* In this event relocation in another area 
would be necessary for all or part of this group, 



_,_ DATE ESTIMATED 

GE2ML1 REQUIRED COST 

Dormitory G Sept, 1964 

1000 Beds 
{Already requested] 



800 Bed/ SSPt= 1965 *3.500,000 



Dining Commons III Sept. 1965 2,000,000 
85Q Seats 



350 seat decrease j 
$600 9 00 cost decrease) 



The ^ preceding three projects should be designed and constructed as 
an integrated unite • The functional relationships required for 
coordinated dining and residence, facilities are such that the entire 
complex should be operative hj September, 1965 



uthwest Residence A 






P fR0 „ P TT „„ DATE ESTmAMQ 

REQUIRED 



-•Of ■«*:;'»(i{t^.» fc * M .p^ w . 



Do 2¥; L 1 S.pt. 1966 ♦ 3 ,6ao,ooo 






Dormitory J Sent ^*? i ,nn A™ 

900 .Beds ^ ~" 96 '' 4,100,000 

1100 bed increas 
h>420 9 000 cost crease) 



"sKa™ IV SSPt 2,100,000 

(Date required advanced f 

Sept. 1969 to Sept 

Unseat decree 

$6?> j, 000 cost decrease) 



from 



2 



The preceding three projects should be designed and cons^rn^n 
entire Comp i ex should b , ^^ ope^Syf^ ^X^l* 



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11 BEACON STREET 
BOSTON 8, MASS. 




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